It’s the broadcast time, stupid.

You can find all the information required about why the NCAA feels a constant need to tinker with the clock rules in this post at cfbstats.com.

Exhibit “A”:  The average time of a CBS-broadcasted game in 2007 was 3:47:04.  The average time of a game with no TV broadcast in 2007 was 3:14:16.

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4 Comments

Filed under College Football, It's Just Bidness, The NCAA

4 responses to “It’s the broadcast time, stupid.

  1. dean

    How about reducing the length of TV timeouts. Pay the bills at halftime. Honestly the halftime shows are a waste of time anyway. It’s same old crap every game;
    Commentator 1: How does So-n-So get back into the game?
    Commentator 2: They’ve got to score more points and stop the other team from scoring.
    BRILLIANT!!!
    While they’re at it they need to stop the sideline reporters from asking the Coaches stupid questions when they’re headed to the locker rooms.

  2. While they’re at it they need to stop the sideline reporters from asking the Coaches stupid questions when they’re headed to the locker rooms.

    C’mon – sometimes that stuff is great, especially when the coaches are so upset about something that they let their guard down. Like John L. Smith’s notable meltdown a few years ago. That was a classic.

  3. dean

    I’ll agree there are moments like the one you mentioned and there are some coaches who I enjoy hearing answer a ridiculous question, Bobby Bowden and Steve Spurrier are usually entertaining.
    For example; Spurrier was asked what he was going to do about the interceptions thrown in the first half. His answer “stop throwing the ball to the other team”. Good stuff.
    And just to count how many times BB will say “dad’gum” is entertaining but as a whole you’ve got to admit the questions they ask are redundant and rather insulting to a coach sometimes. I mean if a coach knew what would stop the other team from doing something they would do it.

  4. hambone44

    Isn’t the whole point of this for the fans at home to watch more commercials? Excuse me if I sound crazy, but why don’t they shorten TV time outs instead. Any one who goes to a college football game on a regular basis should notice that all the TV time outs can disrupt the momentum of the game. I’ve never complained about the length of the actual game. That’s what I look forward to all week. Couldn’t continous “tinkering” with the game year after year have a great affect on the bigger picture?