Georgia Tech, land of passing opportunity

Here’s something I don’t understand.  Follow me through this:

  • Henry County wide receiver Chris Jackson commits to Chan Gailey.
  • Gailey gets axed and is replaced with Paul Johnson.
  • Johnson is honest with the recruit and Jackson, realizing that the new offense being deployed at Tech isn’t receiver-friendly, retracts his commitment.
  • Jackson commits to Alabama.
  • Jackson plays as a freshman, largely as a special teamer.
  • Distressed about his lack of playing time, Jackson decides to transfer, and is given permission to do so by Saban.

So far, I get the logic to all that.  Except now, he’s considering a transfer to… Georgia Tech.  I dunno, maybe the kid feels like he needs to polish his blocking skills.

But you’ve got to love the spin the AJ-C puts on the decision.

… Tech ran 79 percent of the time in Year 1 of Johnson’s option-based offense. It didn’t stop wideout Demaryius Thomas from catching 39 balls for 627 yards. And the Jackets surprised everyone by going 9-4 and winning a share of the ACC Coastal Division.

Tech aims to expand its passing game in Year 2.

Uh huh.  Tech’s second leading receiver last year was Jonathan Dwyer.  He caught eight passes.

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6 Comments

Filed under Georgia Tech Football, Media Punditry/Foibles

6 responses to “Georgia Tech, land of passing opportunity

  1. HVL Dawg

    Off point, but…

    Looks like Saban wants a spot on his roster for someone new.

    What???? Alabama uses reserve skill players on special teams???

  2. Joe

    I think the kid figured out he is not NFL talented and wants to be closer to home and get a degree from Gtu. Pretty sound reasoning to me. Another rankings flub by the services.

  3. John

    A few thoughts…

    Year one in any system is teaching the basics. For Johnson’s offense, the core of the offense – the thing that keeps defenses in a base, balanced formation – is the triple option. So a major focus in year one was teaching the players how to run the core of the offense.

    If you follow Navy blogs or communicate with anyone who seriously follows Navy football, you will see that Georgia Tech’s execution of Paul Johnson’s offense seriously sucked. Even at the end of the season – in the Miami and Georgia games – the execution of the offense was in no way comparable to Navy’s execution, even under Johnson’s successor.

    Georgia Tech was successful solely because of the athleticism of its skill players and their ability to take advantage of the opportunities when they got free in open space.

    In year two, Georgia Tech should have a better understanding of Johnson’s core offense, and should be able to “open the playbook”. You scoff at the idea of a star receiver going to Georgia Tech, but imagine being a defensive coordinator facing Paul Johnson’s offense with Calvin Johnson at wide receiver. Double cover Calvin? That just opens the door for the option. So you’re going to go one-on-one against Calvin? Good luck…

    • You scoff at the idea of a star receiver going to Georgia Tech, but imagine being a defensive coordinator facing Paul Johnson’s offense with Calvin Johnson at wide receiver. Double cover Calvin? That just opens the door for the option. So you’re going to go one-on-one against Calvin? Good luck…

      The idea that five star WR recruits will soon be flocking to Tech to take advantage of single coverage because of the triple option is… creative. But it’s not realistic. There isn’t enough passing in that offense to make those kids happy. Besides that, why does Johnson need that kind of player to run his offense successfully, anyway?

  4. Sweeper

    Paul Johnson does not NEED that kind of player to run his offense. But this offense can showcase an individual’s talent at a position like WR. Given, BeBe Thomas was essentially the only guy to catch passes in the Tech offensive scheme. But consider this, the other teams knew he was the #1 pass option, and he still caught his share of balls because of the system. If you are Tech’s best receiver, you will get your throws, your name will be in the papers, and people will know who you are. Do you think Thomas gets the pub he has now as the third option after Massoqui (sp?) and Green? Hell no. Big fish in a little pond analogy.

  5. Trey

    A few other things on this story:

    1. I believe in addition to playing time, Jackson was switched to D at Bama and he wants to play offense.

    2. He’ll be playing A-Back at GT, so if he wins playing time he will get his touches. Tech will throw a little more in 2009 as well, bringing the position’s role a little closer to that of a slot receiver.

    True, Jackson still probably won’t make the NFL as a WR — but as Joe mentions, he’s likely figured out that’s unlikely anyway.

    3. Jackson was already committed to GT as a sophomore and has deep ties at Tech.