Georgia-ASU: a bullet point preview

I can’t claim to have some coherent overview about how tomorrow’s going to play out – with what we’ve seen in the first three games, how could I? – so you’ll just have to settle for a bunch of bullet points, I’m afraid.

  • Given the relative national rankings of both schools, the minimalist in me wants to say it’s about the turnover margin, stupid.  Except that hasn’t mattered too much so far for Georgia, which is surprising.  The Dawgs have won the two games when they were -2 and lost the one in which they were -3.  But I’ve said all along I don’t see how that’s sustainable – either that pace, or winning in spite of it.  You’d figure something’s gotta give tomorrow night.
  • From what I can tell, Arizona State sounds like it’s going to come in running a game plan fairly similar to what South Carolina wanted to do:  run a ball control offense and leave it up to the defense to do enough to hold Georgia’s score down.  That didn’t work out too great for the ‘Cocks, thanks to special teams play.
  • On the other hand, if you’re ASU and your quarterback has any sort of an arm at all, aren’t you going to be the least bit tempted to take some shots throwing the ball well down field, based on what you saw from Georgia’s defense last week?
  • One thing I’ll be curious to watch is ASU’s defensive scheming.  At this point, it’s fair to say that Georgia’s passing game has established itself as a credible threat.  If the Sun Devils safeties respect the pass, that in turn should open up the Dawgs rushing attack.
  • For Georgia on defense, I’m interested in personnel.  I’m guessing that Martinez is going to keep throwing different combinations of guys out there in the hopes that he can find some consistent playmakers on pass defense.
  • As if the Georgia secondary doesn’t already have enough problems, a wet turf that affects their footing is bound to add to those.
  • I see a lot of people are calling this game a trap game, too.  How many trap games can you play in a row?
  • It really wouldn’t surprise me if Caleb King takes over the starting tailback job sooner rather than later, especially if he continues to pass block as ferociously as he did against Arkansas.
  • Can Drew Butler keep up the ridiculous pace he’s on?
  • Gee, I wonder what the Georgia kickoff team has up its sleeve this week.  I can’t wait to see what Coach Fabris pulls out of his bag of tricks.
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15 Comments

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15 responses to “Georgia-ASU: a bullet point preview

  1. RedCrake

    I spoke with someone at Butts-Mehre this week and they told me Fabris is planning to have the coverage team line up on the goal line and have Walsh kick the ball backwards toward our own end zone.

    I guess the directional kicking wasn’t presenting enough of a “challenge”.

  2. BeerMoney

    I too am looking forward to personnel use on our defense tomorrow. If the upper classmen are getting torched, how much worse can the young guys do? I would rather them get the game experience so that it may help them develop…even if they get beat. A lot of our DB’s never really came into their own until late rin their careers, but most of them played a lot as youngsters.

  3. The Realist

    Will the defense stop selling out against the run?

    It’s nice to make a team one dimensional, but I think it works to a team’s disadvantage if they can’t stop that one dimension.

    Instead, wouldn’t it work to Georgia’s advantage to rely on the interior of the d-line to stop the run and dedicate everyone else to coverage? Stopping the run with the fewest number of defenders is the ideal. Instead of everyone thinking run first, it might only take four or five guys to stop the run, leaving the other six guys to play the pass. You might give up a big run here or there, but you are far less likely to give up a 50 yard run dropping guys into coverage than you are to give up a 50 yard pass biting on even the weakest of play action fakes.

    If a team proves adept at running the ball, then you can readjust your focus, but until then, the linebackers and safeties should think pass first. That will stop the slow death by play action that has destroyed this team the past two weeks.

  4. Frank

    My crystal ball is glowing. Unexpectedly.

    Dawgs in a rout.

  5. Turd Ferguson

    I think you’re probably right about Caleb King. I won’t be surprised if he has a huge day tomorrow (assuming that Arizona State pays sufficient respect to our passing game).

    I really try not to ever assume too much about a game before it actually starts, but it’s difficult for me to see this one being close. It’s between the hedges, where our offense put up 41 on a South Carolina defense that has to be at least a little (if not very, very much) better than Arizona State’s. And as far as I can tell, they’ve done just about all of their scoring on the ground, which is the only thing our defense has really defended well so far this season.

    I guess my only real worry is that we’ll get caught looking ahead to LSU, … but I seriously doubt that will happen.

    • RedCrake

      I dunno — in the ESPN Pac-10 blogger’s picks for the weekend clearly state that Arizona State has the best defense we’ve played all year.

      If it’s in print it must be true.

      • RedCrake

        There are just all kinds of things wrong with that sentence. Oh well, I guess that’s what I get for letting ESPN rot my brain.

  6. ArchDawg

    I see this starting out close through the first quarter or so, as Arizona State has been prepping for this game all offseason (sound familiar?). But I think we’ll pull away as the game goes on–Arizona State doesn’t have a defense.

  7. 69Dawg

    If it is raining ASU will spend the first half wondering what’s that falling from the sky. With this happening we can suprise them.

  8. papadawg

    My suggestion for Coach Fab (since everybody else has one for him):

    Onside Kicks
    Every. Single. Time.

    No, really. I’m serious.

    It would be fantastic.

  9. Wolfman

    I think Drew Butler could kick it a hundred thousand yards.