Show me the money.

Read Barnhart’s latest thought piece about SEC expansion.  It doesn’t touch on tradition or rivalries and what makes the best competitive fit.  It’s all about keeping up with Big Ten revenue generation.

And that’s the typical analysis you see when somebody discusses the underpinnings of the whole crazed expansion debate.  There’s simply a cold-blooded recognition of the laws of supply and demand that I haven’t seen anybody question, other than the spectacularly clueless John Feinstein (and that’s probably due to Delany hatred more than anything else).

Yet, when you turn to the talk about the BCS and playoffs, you rarely see the same type of analysis.  Basic economics don’t apply in the same way.

Why is that?

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5 Comments

Filed under BCS/Playoffs, College Football, It's Just Bidness

5 responses to “Show me the money.

  1. Mike

    The good Senator writes;

    “Yet, when you turn to the talk about the BCS and playoffs, you rarely see the same type of analysis. Basic economics don’t apply in the same way.

    Why is that?”

    Selective reasoning, I would imagine. For whatever reason, the bowl system folks seem to have the collective ears of the University Presidents and Athletic Directors

  2. Hogbody Spradlin

    I wonder if Big Ten expansion plans are motivated by worry as much as empire? Big Ten demographics are Rust Belt demographics. They scored a real coup with the TV network, but it can be copied. The core Big Ten states are losing population relative to us backwards yahoos down South.

  3. The basic economic principles do apply, however, we are in a period of prohibition. The college football Volstead Act is coming.

    • Mayor of Dawgtown

      Nobody seems to be talking about the effect this sort of expansion will have on basketball, and conversely, what effect basketball will have on expansion. Kentucky is a really attractive target for Big Ten expansion precisely because of basketball. It is one of the absolute top basketball programs in the nation and would be competitive in football in the Big Ten (there are only 3 or 4 programs in the Big Ten that really are substantially better that UK in football, year in and year out). The Big Ten is a more prestigious basketball conference and Kentucky would instantly be a favorite to win the Big Ten basketball title every year. Geographically UK is right there with the Big Ten, too. Get out a map and look. The SEC may not just be in an expansion mode before this is over–the SEC may have to be in a protection mode, too.

  4. Pingback: "Don’t Mess With Texas": Why Snagging the Longhorns is Critical if the SEC is to Survive Big Ten Expansion « MrSEC.com