Running the “6-3 deep post”: a page out of the Mark Richt playbook

Chris Brown has a fun read posted about a staple from the FSU offense of the early/mid ’90s.

The numbers refer to the number of steps the receiver takes: six vertically, attacking the defender’s outside hip, then three quick ones at 45 degrees to the sideline (sometimes with a head turn but not necessarily), with the break to the post made at full speed on the ninth step, or the third of the “6-3.” The idea is that you will take away the safeties either through play action or some kind of inside route — like in the Mills or double-post concepts — while the 6-3 technique will enable the outside receiver to get plenty of leverage as he bursts inside.

Hello, A.J. Green.

As for how best to utilize the technique…

If you want to throw a deep post, particularly when there is an inside route designed to draw the safety away from the outside receiver, I suggest using a technique called the “6-3 post.”

Hello, Orson Charles.

It’s a beautiful thing when it all comes together.

“And the ball was… on the money.” Loves me some vintage Keith Jackson.

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4 Comments

Filed under Strategery And Mechanics

4 responses to “Running the “6-3 deep post”: a page out of the Mark Richt playbook

  1. S FL Chapter of the Bulldog Nation

    I’m with you there…Keith has a one of a kind voice. And he’s got a lil more stock with me because he’s from Bremen. Hate to say it, but I even like the Gatorade commercial talking about how they changed the game, because of Keith.

    • Regular Guy

      Isn’t that basically the route that Fred Gibson ran to beat Justin Miller at Clemson?

      • Hobnail_Boot

        Yep, except Fred didn’t have to make the 2nd cut that sharp because Miller had already lost his hips.

  2. Mike

    That is a very nice set of routes and very nice set up. Will this be the first year Richt has tried it?