Surrender, Emmert.

Hi.  We’re the NCAA.  You may remember us from such hits as this

“One of the grave dangers stemming from our love of sports is that the sports themselves can become too big to fail, indeed, too big to even challenge,” Emmert said. “The result can be an erosion of academic values that are replaced by the value of hero worship and winning at all costs. All involved in intercollegiate athletics must be watchful that programs and individuals do not overwhelm the values of higher education.”

… and this.

Ed Ray, the executive committee chair and Oregon State president, said university presidents and chancellors let the NCAA know at a meeting a year ago that a change in the culture of college athletics is needed.

“They said, ‘We’ve had enough. This has to stop. We have to reassert our responsibilities and charge to oversee intercollegiate athletics,’” Ray said. “So the first question you asked is, ‘Does this send a message?’ The message is, the presidents and the chancellors are in charge.”

Now you may wonder what all that high falutin’ language means in the real world.  Not to worry, people.  We’re on the mother.

Boosters would be allowed to contribute directly to the compensation of coaches, potentially controlling more of the terms under which coaches are paid, if a new NCAA proposal is adopted.

Under the plan, described in a 12-page NCAA document obtained by The Chronicle,boosters could come up with their own bonuses instead of giving their money to the athletic department and hoping that they would have the influence to get it written into a coach’s contract, one NCAA rules expert says.

Such a move, which would have to be approved by universities, could prove problematic if a booster gained too much control and later committed NCAA violations.

“Could prove problematic”?  ‘Ya think?  Because nothing says the presidents and chancellors are in charge like giving Bobby Lowder a green light to buy coaches.

Oh, and tucked down a little further in the article is this:

One of the biggest proposed changes could be a philosophical one, as the NCAA recognizes that a guiding principle of its rules—competitive equity—may no longer be a priority.

“The playing field is not and has never been and never will be level,” said James F. Barker, president of Clemson University and chair of the NCAA working group that came up with the proposed changes. “To say the NCAA should try to create a level playing field is impossible and is not a wise path to take.”

That, my friends, is the sound of an organization giving up.  The NCAA’s got child rape covered, but that core mission stuff… man, that’s hard work.

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26 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

26 responses to “Surrender, Emmert.

  1. The other other Doug

    Richt has lost control of the NCAA. I blame Bobo.

    • Puffdawg

      I think you should consider adding this into the lexicon, BTW.

    • Cojones

      Yes he has. Kolton Houston will not play football for UGA in the near future. The NCAA will not certify he is free of PEDs. Richt says Kolton hasn’t taken them and is the most tested CFB player in the country.

  2. GaskillDawg

    To be fair, this is in the proposal stage. The presidents have not voted on it and won’t until October at the earliest. If the presidents vote it down you will post about how they were consistent?

    • In order to be passed, doesn’t something have to go through the proposal stage first?

      But the answer to your question is hells, yeah – simply because if it gets shot down, I expect the “WTF were they thinking?” comments to be awesome. ;)

  3. LRGK9

    That’s your definition of fair? That’s the best you got. Hogwash.

  4. paul

    Well, we already have government of the money, by the money and for the money. Apparently, that’s working out so well we’ve decided to extend the model to college athletics.

  5. JoDawg

    Maybe Freeh would be interested in doing some pro bono work, since its not all about the money.

  6. 81Dog

    I’m shocked that an administrator from Clemson would be speaking for the committee that came up with this brainstorm. Who else was on the committee? Pat Dye, Jackie Sherill, Danny Ford and Barry Switzer?

    “All in favor of letting boosters who sweat $100 bills and want to win at all costs pay football coaches OVER the talbe say ‘aye.’” Sheesh. Who could see that one coming?

  7. What fresh hell is this?

    WTF. Is it April 1st?

  8. Macallanlover

    Yeah, because we cannot have a precisely level playing field in all areas we should not adopt a goal to do as much as we can. In a country lacking leadership, the Clemson president joins the brilliant people who say let’s run to another state and hide so we don’t have to vote on an issue we might lose. Stick that head under the water of Lake Clemson Mr. Barker, why step up to the tough issues when you can sit on your arse and whine? You would do the students and department heads a great service.

    If you want to say the big schools and small schools have different needs and capabilities, no one can argue. The NCAA already has a solution to that and it is called separate divisions. If we need to add another to allow competition between schools that are relatively equal, add another break point (and please don’t allow competition between them so we can see better football games.)

    • 81Dog

      Mac, it’s actually Lake Hartwell, but other than that, you are hitting the nail on the head.

      God forbid someone in a college administration actually understood the difference between an equal opportunity and an equal result. And dont tell me about “barriers to entry.” There are always barriers. IBM ruled the business automation world 50 years ago, and then a couple of nerds in Washington state started writing computer code, and a couple of guys in a garage in California built an Apple computer. Anyone know how those guys and their Division III equivalent programs made out?

      • Macallanlover

        I know you are technically correct 81, but there is damn much orange around that lake that affiliating it with Clem’s Son is a warning for the Chosen People to stay away.

        • 81Dog

          Not on the Tugaloo River channel branch! There’s plenty of red and black from Toccoa down past Lavonia…..Just sayin’

  9. Monday Night Frotteur

    See? Competitive balance concerns are phony. Ending the prohibition on outside income for revenue athletes is the easiest and fairest way to solve most of the NCAA’s major problems.

  10. Always Someone Else's Fault

    Subtext: “We’re tired of trying to explain to parents why their kids are taught more and more by overworked and underpaid interns (otherwise known as graduate students), all while tuition and coaching salaries keep escalating. If the boosters pay the coaches directly, then we can wash our hands of that little PR nightmare. Now, excuse me while I hop on a plane to attend a conference and try to schmooze some research grants. Sally will be handling sophomore physics in my absence.”

    Totally about the education, when you think about it.

  11. Not to be too contrarian, but might this take a shadowy, smoky-room practice and expose it to the light of day?

    Ah who am I kidding, our sport is doomed.

    /gives keyboard the Don Music treatment

  12. By Georgia We Did It

    Pulp Fiction and The Simpons in one post. You’ve outdone yourself Senator.

  13. Mayor of Dawgtown

    This thread and the one above should convince anybody who was on the fence that the big football conferences need to leave the NCAA.