The further adventures of “I heard it on the Internet, so it must be true.”

That legitimate reporters spent time, effort and energy running this nonsense down is a sad commentary on our times.  Journalism, ftw!

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9 Comments

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9 responses to “The further adventures of “I heard it on the Internet, so it must be true.”

  1. TennesseeDawg

    After the Petrino stuff, nothing would surprise me.

  2. Tronan

    Cue AJC sportswriter blog about how the debunking of the Miles rumor is a sign of sub-par recruiting at UGA.

  3. Scorpio Jones, III

    Two mistakes here….one….the idea that ANY sports reporter is a legitimate reporter is stretching a definition to its limit.

    Two: That we have allowed social media to do anything other than confuse issues.

    That any journalist who, while covering his or her beat, accepted and expected, to be fed free by his or her beat subject, could then be called a legitimate reporter is amazing…and inaccurate to put it mildly.
    :)

  4. AthensHomerDawg

    Sounds like Western Kentucky has their own version of the Red and Black.

  5. 69Dawg

    True journalism died with the advent of the 24/7 365 news networks. The news reporters were under such stress to fill all that time that they began to report anything from whatever source derived. Social Media is merely a convenient and easy source, whether it is true or false is secondary, it fills time and space.

  6. Dog in Fla

    Mark loses contol of Les’ Hat

  7. ctfain

    Some days you have to ask yourself: do I want to I run down this garbage, or do I want emails and tweets from morons who don’t know its garbage, but make up a surprisingly large and active portion of my readership.

  8. Skeeter

    My sources say Carvel is working on a huge feature story on how the Les Miles rumor will hurt UGA recruiting.

  9. Cojones

    Has anyone realized that a direct measurement of coaching ability can be performed this year by comparing their D to ours when we play?