Mark Richt doesn’t really care who loses control of the 10-second rule.

According to Chip Towers, today’s teleconference with Georgia’s head coach “… was initially set up because numerous beat reporters had contacted Richt about getting his reaction to the proposed 10-second substitution rule to slow down up-tempo offenses in college football.”

His reaction?  Essentially a yawn.

“Again, I just don’t know how many people are consistently snapping the ball under 10,” Richt said. “You can still go no-huddle and you can still go at a pretty good clip. …Even if you snap it at …29 or whatever it is, you’re still going pretty darn fast. I don’t think it will be a huge deal if it does change, but I doubt very seriously it changes this quickly.”

It sounds like that’s for two reasons.  First, to the extent it’s a conditioning issue, that’s on the program, not the rule.

“I feel like if you can train offensive players to play five or six plays in a row, you can train defensive players to play that many plays in a row, too,” Richt said Thursday afternoon. “I personally don’t think it’s a health-issue deal, but if there’s some evidence otherwise, it will be interesting to see it. …I think it’s somebody’s assumption. I don’t think there’s any hard evidence on it.”

And the second?  It’s sort of what I figured – Richt’s experience importing the no-huddle to the SEC has left him a bit skeptical about the whole thing.  (Not that I blame him.)

“We started going fast at Florida State in 1992 and then ’93 we were going at breakneck speed as fast as we could until I got to Georgia,” he said.

ACC officials, he said, put the ball on the ground and got out of the way.

“It wasn’t quite happening that way in the SEC,” Richt said. “Who knows what the reasons were?”

Actually, we do know that.

… The mandatory pause is to allow the officiating crew to get in position, Gaston said. Richt argued that the officials should put the ball in play as soon as they are set, regardless of how much time has elapsed, but Gaston said that would provide the offense an unfair advantage.

“Mark Richt would eat their lunch,” he said. “He would go straight to the ball and snap it. He’d get in 100 plays. We have about half the coaches who think we go too fast and about half who think we go too slow so we must be in about the right spot.”

So you’ll have to pardon Richt if he doesn’t seem too worked up about this now.  He dealt with rules manipulation before and nobody was particularly worked up about it then.

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9 Comments

Filed under Strategery And Mechanics, The NCAA

9 responses to “Mark Richt doesn’t really care who loses control of the 10-second rule.

  1. Richt’s take is precisely what I thought it’d be. And thanks for the reference material. That really puts in a lot of perspective.

    As I’ve said here already, my hope is that, after this attention, the officials will take back control of the game, as they did when Richt wanted to go lights out. Maybe not quite to that extent, but just slow it down enough to be fair to the defense. If they’ll do that. there’ll be no need for a rule.

    “Again, I just don’t know how many people are consistently snapping the ball under 10,” Richt said. “You can still go no-huddle and you can still go at a pretty good clip. …Even if you snap it at …29 or whatever it is, you’re still going pretty darn fast. I don’t think it will be a huge deal if it does change, but I doubt very seriously it changes this quickly.”

    Exactly. The 10-second rule wasn’t really going to work, anyway. It wouldn’t change that much. Right idea, maybe. But they need to work this out honestly, and with thoroughness.
    ~~~

    • PTC DAWG

      I liked CMR’s comment about going 5-6 plays…both units should be able to do it.

      • Agree, PTC. The problem comes in when the officials go so fast they don’t allow enough time for the defense to be ready. That creates an unfair game.

        IDK if Richt addressed that or not, but I bet he would agree.
        ~~~

        • Hackerdog

          Given that Richt ran FSU’s offense fast and tried to run UGA’s offense fast, I think he’s probably on the side of fast offense.

  2. PTC DAWG

    I don’t blame him for being indifferent….

    On a side note, WHAT IF the SEC had allowed CMR to turn it loose in the beginning?

    • Dog in Fla

      “Mark Richt would eat their lunch,” would have clearly been a Lexiconworthy state of being. If not on its own, at least as a subset of
      “Evil Richt,” “Reddinged,” “Touchmybaby,” or “Touche, baby”

      • adam

        It would be cool if (assuming this rule doesn’t pass) Richt and Bobo moved the offense back to breakneck speeds. Hutson likes going fast. Let’s go fast.

  3. Was it Fulmer who belly-ached about Richt’s pace and lobbied B’ham to do something? Any one have any links to that?