If you’re not going to pay them, pay for them.

John Infante makes an eloquent point that deserves mention.

… If collegiate athletics continues to insist (and is allowed to continued to insist) on amateurism, then a bachelor’s degree remains the primary compensation for athletes. Taking that away from the athletes who most need athletics to have that opportunity would reduce the value of what they get out of college athletics too far. Part of the commitment to academically challenged or underprepared athletes should be to see them through all the way to a bachelor’s degree.

Absolutely.  It’s not enough to say your cause is noble.  And if you don’t like the added expense exposure, don’t sign kids who are academic risks.

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9 Comments

Filed under Academics? Academics., The NCAA

9 responses to “If you’re not going to pay them, pay for them.

  1. I agree with Infante’s premise regarding the degree with a couple of tweaks. First, require the university to commit to a 4-year scholarship because under the 1-year renewable, roster management will get even more aggressive. A recruiting bust may become a 6+ year commitment and, therefore, increase the need to weed the player out of the program as quickly as possible. Second, if a player leaves before his eligibility expires, the athlete leaves the education behind as well (sort of like a person who changes jobs and leaves the stock options behind). Third, the university should have some protection for continued progress to graduation and a date certain where the benefit expires. Otherwise, I think it’s a great idea.

  2. ASEF

    At the heart of the UNC scandal is an academic support group unable to handle the demands of the job. Even the whistleblower took the path of least resistance and simply bailed on actually educating her students, blaming the system itself. However, community colleges erase these deficits in motivated students all the time, so claims that “these students can’t read” make me smile (in lieu of crying). Academic reading and writing are highly specialized activities. Students who are not yet proficient at these activities are only “illiterate” in the sense that they do not readily consume or produce Academic Prose. My mom didn’t know how to prepare traditional French sauces – but she sure as hell could cook.

    These students can make real progress towards a real college degree. The system has to recognize their starting point and hire people who know how to bridge those gaps – and not undergraduates or former HR personnel who took a few teacher courses.

  3. An eloquent point? My sentiments exactly! ;-)
    “Some funding for continued scholarship towards completing that degree or even an advanced degree. Why not? Maybe fund some type of mechanism to help players later in life. A trust? 97% of college players will never see the pros. The last chance they have to capitalize on a lifetime investment in their sport will be from their college experience.”

  4. gastr1

    At the very least offer them a certain number of tuition credits with a (lengthy) expiration date. How hard would that be? Not hard at all.

  5. greenhulk211

    Acadsemic reading and writing are highly specialized acstivities. Students who are not yet proficient at these actisvities are only “illitesrate” in the sense that they sdo not readily consume or produce Ascademic Prose. My mom didn’t know how to prepare tradistional French sauces – but she sure as hell could csook. http://num.to/398722245177