One tough cookie

Well, if this isn’t the capper:

He [Denny Murray, Aaron’s dad] also told me that Murray was hurt a lot worse than people thought in that 2010 game against Auburn in which Nick Fairley was allowed to unleash a personal assault. Murray actually left that game with a broken sternum, in addition to shoulder and knee injuries. [Emphasis added.]

It’s impressive that Aaron was able to finish the game.  I’m not sure what adjective applies to Fairley being able to finish the game.

Oh… and seriously, this?  Sure.

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25 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

“That’s why I’m on this case.”

You’ve read about O’Bannon.  You know about the NLRB ruling.  Now meet Jeffrey Kessler, whose antitrust suit may be the biggest threat of all to college football as we know it.

Kessler is essentially asking the courts to decide that players are employees whose compensation is being illegally constrained (to the amount of an athletic scholarship), and to lift those restrictions to open the market. Under such a scenario, the “total competitive landscape will change,” he says. “Maybe Ohio State will say, we’re going to pay X amount a year, which we’ll put in trust for when they leave school. The more years they stay, the more they’ll get. Another school might not offer more than the scholarship.

“That’s what happens in a market. It doesn’t force the schools to do anything except what they decide.”

And even here, again, comes an invitation to stop the bleeding:

Kessler acknowledges the possibility that a settlement could occur that “puts some system in place” to provide meaningful compensation for all future football and men’s basketball players.

What exactly that would look like is unclear, but he hinted that the sorts of changes that some people within the NCAA are talking about now — in which the wealthier sports programs might offer provide scholarships valued up to the full cost of attendance, or give some sort of small stipend — would not cut it.

While another lawyer without Kessler’s resources and resume might be willing to get a nice payday for his clients, “if I get my class certified, there won’t be any settlement without real change in the system,” he says.

I doubt anyone’s listening now, but it will be worth watching to see if attitudes change should O’Bannon not go in the NCAA’s favor.  My bet is it’ll take Congress not riding to the NCAA’s rescue to shake things up.

27 Comments

Filed under College Football, It's Just Bidness

Lose weight – fast!

I missed this little note from Weiszer yesterday, but it’s interesting:

It’s not just the big guys. Pruitt mentioned senior cornerback Damian Swann as one of those guys who needs to get in better shape.

Ain’t nobody escaping the man’s public disapproval.

Well, except for the S&C coach: “Fatigue makes a coward out of everybody. We’ve got to get in shape as a football team. We’re nowhere where we need to be. We’ve got to improve on that. Coach T (strength coach Joe Tereshinski) will do that this summer.”  (Cue the doubters.)

16 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, The Body Is A Temple

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water…

The NCAA comes up with another subjective safety rule.

I guess they felt officials might have idle time on their hands with the change to the targeting rules.  Good luck on figuring out when a running quarterback behind the line of scrimmage is in a passing situation, fellas.

17 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

Time will tell.

I know I’m whaling away on a certain deceased thoroughbred again, but damn if they don’t keep pulling me back in.

I doubt Fox was shy in letting B-M know that his recruiting was tied to his contract situation, so what was the point of McGarity’s Hamlet act, exactly?  Maybe recruiting isn’t that important to him?  Yeah, that must be it.  Oh, wait.

“We need to recruit at a very high level, because you have to continually kind of restock every year,” McGarity said. “That’s a very important point, and we did talk about that as well as other things. But needless to say sometimes that is the elephant in the room. We realize what needs to be done.”

Riiiight.  I have no idea what’s going on there.  I doubt I will if the time ever comes when something needs to be done about the head football coach, either.

7 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

Next time you’re in Athens…

Andy Staples speculates on what schools could bring to the training table now that the NCAA isn’t holding anyone back on what they can fill the feeding troughs with.

He’s sure got Athens nailed.

Georgia: While Latin food isn’t the first thing that comes to mind in Athens, the crew at Cali N Tito’s could walk ample quantities of skirt steak and fried plantains to the nearby Butts-Mehre football complex. Also, with service inside the building, Mark Richt wouldn’t have to worry about his players getting tempted by the beer from the gas station next door, or distracted by the sundresses on the premises of Cali N Titos…

Sounds like a man who’s been to the Classic City more than a few times.

I’ll know who to blame if the line at Cali’s is longer the next time I’m there.

43 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Media Punditry/Foibles

“We don’t need an investigation, thorough or otherwise…”

If you wonder why some people are reluctant to pursue criminal complaints against star athletes, this might help illuminate the problem:

Officer Pate’s blunt interviewing style did not help, the student said. “The first thing he asked me,” she recounted, “was if I was sure this was rape or if I just didn’t want a baby or wanted the morning after pill.” He also made comments, she said, “like, ‘Are you sure you want to file a report? It will be very awkward, especially for a female.’”

In his complaint to the police, the father wrote that Officer Pate had suggested that an investigation “would be futile, as ‘this kind of stuff happens all the time here.’”

Or to put it another way,

A decade before the Winston case, the inspector general found that Florida State had violated its policy when the athletic department failed to inform the campus police of a rape accusation against one of its standout football players. Mr. Ruiz, the former prosecutor who handled the case for the state attorney’s office, recalled that the coach at the time, the revered Bobby Bowden, attempted to convince him that a crime had not occurred. A jury eventually acquitted the player.

“I learned quickly what football meant in the South,” said Mr. Ruiz, who grew up in New York State. “Clearly, it meant a lot. And with respect to this case I learned that keeping players on the field was a priority.”

Just win, baby.  Everyone in a college town knows what that means.

59 Comments

Filed under College Football, Crime and Punishment