Category Archives: ACC Football

“GO TO FEWER GAMES”

Yes, all is well in the world of D-1 ticket marketing.

Not many teams would tell you to go to fewer games.

Most would try to push a full season package on you, even if that requires more money or more time than you possess.

We are extremely thankful for the support of our Miami Hurricanes season ticket holders, but we understand that a full season of tickets is not for everyone, and that’s OK.

So we created the new Two-Game Mini-Plan to give fans an opportunity to experience the two best college football events in South Florida.

I guess that beats “four tickets, four hot dogs and four Cokes”.  But not by much.  Then again,

1. Better seats are available at better prices through the Two-Game Mini-Plan than on StubHub and other broker sites for the FSU game alone.

2. Florida State tickets will not be available to the general public on a single-game basis.

3. We’re throwing in a complimentary Miami Hurricanes hat with every purchase (an added $30 value per plan).

Granted, Miami’s got its own set of special problems, starting with a pretty sorry stadium arrangement.  But this is also the kind of crack in the foundation you get when it’s more important to kowtow to ESPN than it is to your fan base.

(h/t Doc Saturday)

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Filed under ACC Football, It's Just Bidness

Friday morning buffet

The tidbits just keep on coming.

19 Comments

Filed under ACC Football, BCS/Playoffs, Big 12 Football, Georgia Football, Media Punditry/Foibles, Recruiting, SEC Football

Friday morning buffet

You should eat.

20 Comments

Filed under ACC Football, Georgia Football, It's Just Bidness, Look For The Union Label, Recruiting, SEC Football, The NCAA, What's Bet In Vegas Stays In Vegas, Whoa, oh, Alabama

Friday morning buffet

Even on a slow news day, the buffet is there for you.

40 Comments

Filed under ACC Football, Crime and Punishment, ESPN Is The Devil, Georgia Football, Nick Saban Rules, Recruiting, SEC Football, The NCAA

The rising cost of cupcakes

So how expensive are those appearance fees getting?  Pricey enough that the ACC is seriously considering this:

Some Atlantic Coast Conference schools are considering scheduling future nonconference games against — ironically — other ACC schools, league athletic directors and coaches told ESPN.com…

Because of the eight-game league schedule, non-primary crossover rivals in the Atlantic and Coastal divisions may only play each other once in an 11-year span. This prompted discussion at the ACC spring meetings about playing other ACC teams as nonconference opponents in future seasons.

Sucks for you, mid-majors.

**************************************************************************

UPDATE:  And before you ask…

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Filed under ACC Football, It's Not Easy Being A Mid-Major

ACC, come on in – the eight-game water’s just fine.

In a move that won’t hurt the SEC’s chances in the new postseason order, it looks like the ACC will also stick with an eight-game conference scheduling format.  It may turn out to be an even closer emulation than that.

League officials have been asked to consider a model similar to the SEC’s – an eight-game conference schedule, plus the guarantee of at least one game against another power conference. Many ACC schools already do this.

Notre Dame’s commitment of five ACC games per year lessens the pressure to jump to a nine-game format, which the Pac-12 and Big 12 already use. The Big Ten will begin a nine-game schedule in 2016.

While there may be no consequences from the call on the playoff front, there’s TV to consider.  (There’s always TV to consider.)

The decision must be considered through the prism of playoff leverage and a potential ACC Channel, which is on hold while its long-term partner ESPN launches the SEC Network in August.

Perhaps nine games gives a channel more attractive conference matchups, but SEC officials argue its league has more inventory with eight because of the guarantee of seven annual home games for most teams along with the emergence of neutral-site games. The ACC could take this approach if its non-conference schedules are stout.

They’ll stick to that story until they want the extra money badly enough.

Oh, and don’t miss the In other scheduling news tacked on at the end of the story for the other side of the eight-game conference schedule move.

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Filed under ACC Football

Maryland thinks it’s suffered enough already.

I tell you what, if Maryland had put as much effort into managing the financial affairs of its athletic department as it is fighting the ACC’s attempt to collect a $52 million exit payment following its announced departure to the Big Ten, the Terps may never have felt the pressure to leave in the first place.  It’s served a number of its former peers (North Carolina, Wake Forest, Georgia Tech, Duke, North Carolina State, Clemson, Notre Dame, Syracuse and Virginia) with subpoenas.  It’s also hit the conference with a demand about… scheduling.

Maryland has also requested documents connected to the formation of the Maryland men’s basketball team’s 2013-14 ACC schedule. For the first time since the league was founded, the Terps did not host Duke or North Carolina in College Park. At the league media day in Charlotte, ACC Commissioner John Swofford was asked how a scheduling quirk like that comes about and whether it was connected to Maryland’s pending departure.

“Through the regular scheduling process,” Swofford said then. “That’s not particularly unusual. The great thing we have in this league right now, when you look at the quality of programs, you can’t have a bad home schedule. You’re going to have quality teams and quality brands coming in wherever you are. Obviously one of the things you lose when you get bigger is some people don’t play each other as much. That’s just part of the growth.”

Mike Slive nods in agreement.

Give ‘em credit for being persistent buggers.

According to a motion to stay discovery filed by the ACC on March 4, Maryland served the ACC 94 document requests covering a time span of 12 years in late December. Shortly thereafter, the court filing says, Maryland began serving subpoenas to the ACC schools and eight third-party media entities and subpoenas are currently pending with at least 19 separate entities seeking more than 35 categories of documents from each.

In the example subpoenas filed to Duke and North Carolina State, 47 categories of documents are requested, ranging from documents related to the ACC’s constitution to media talking points after Maryland announced its departure to the evaluation of possible new members.

Third-party media entities?  Not Disney!  Well, yes, now that you mention it.

In addition, Maryland has served subpoenas to ESPN, consistent with its allegation that the television network coaxed the ACC into trying to lure Big Ten schools away.

I assume the irony isn’t escaping anyone there.

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Filed under ACC Football, ESPN Is The Devil