Category Archives: College Football

Todd Gurley is not a crook.

I realize I run the risk of getting virtually bitch-slapped for what I’m about to post.  And I’m sorry about that.  I have no doubt of the sincerity of the author of this post.  As sincere as she may be, though, she’s way off base with her sentiment.

Todd Gurley hasn’t broken the law.  He hasn’t broken a team rule.  He’s still in good standing with his coaches and his teammates.  He still practices with them.

What he stands accused of is exactly the same thing Mark Richt does every time he gets behind the wheel of that big Ford truck and faces the camera:  getting paid for being himself.  And if Todd Gurley left Georgia tomorrow, he’d be free to pick up where he left off.

That isn’t to excuse Gurley.  The NCAA rule exists and he’s alleged to have violated it.  There are consequences.

But there’s nothing noble about his suspension.  Georgia isn’t taking some brave stand here.  And, with all due respect to Mary Grace Alston Lyon, it’s wrong to romanticize the situation.  All you’re doing is encouraging the greedy bastards who are well on their way to ruining our beloved sport to stay greedy.

College football may have a soul.  But the people forcing Todd Gurley to sit out and be unable to contribute to his team have money market accounts and reserve funds.  Don’t make the mistake of confusing the two.  Gurley and college football deserve better than that.

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210 Comments

Filed under College Football, It's Just Bidness, The NCAA

Pick up a six-pack from your local retailer today.

If this is a real thing, some enterprising brewery is on to something.

7 Comments

Filed under College Football

Wednesday morning buffet

Another day, another buffet.

25 Comments

Filed under BCS/Playoffs, College Football, Crime and Punishment, ESPN Is The Devil, Georgia Football, It's Just Bidness, Media Punditry/Foibles, Political Wankery, Recruiting, SEC Football, Stats Geek!

Today’s cool thing

Lots of folks playing with this interactive fan map, courtesy of the NY Times.

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Filed under College Football

“This is sort of the way of the world now.”

It’s still hard for some of these stats to sink in.

Entering Week 6, less than a third of FBS teams are holding opponents to fewer than 350 yards a game. An increasing number of offenses are doubling that number.

Through last weekend there were 12 games in which an FBS team netted 700 or more yards of offense, according to the NCAA. There were 21 such games in the entirety of last season.

Last season there were eight 500-yard passing performances. That mark already has been reached this season.

If there was any doubt, there shouldn’t be any more.  We’re in a new era of college football offense.

So how do you judge a defense in a pace world?  Take it away, Boom.

Fourteen FBS teams are averaging 80 or more offensive plays a game, led by Western Kentucky, which has averaged 91 plays in its 2-2 start. Just seven teams averaged that number of plays last fall, and only three teams reached that mark as recently as the 2011 season.

Florida’s Will Muschamp, formerly a defensive coordinator at Texas, Auburn and LSU, says the faster tempo has made total yardage less relevant. “I think it’s more about yards per play in the run game, yards per play in the pass game,” Muschamp said. “That’s a little bit more reflective of how you’re playing defense.

In case you’re wondering, by that measure, Georgia ranks fourth in the SEC in rushing defense and ninth in passing defense.  Both are better than Florida’s.

15 Comments

Filed under College Football

“Back in the day, going to a football game used to be the biggest thing you did in the fall.”

Another area of haves/have-nots concern for college football is attendance.

Through five weeks, announced attendance in Football Bowl Subdivision games is down 1 percent compared to this point in 2013 and nearly 7 percent from three years ago.

The average FBS home crowd this season is 44,997, according to a CBSSports.com analysis of NCAA attendance data. That is down from 45,596 through five weeks in 2013, 47,181 in 2012 and 48,279 in 2011.

The good news for the game’s attendance health: Crowds are up 3 percent among the top 25 attendance leaders, due in part to some expanded stadiums. Seventeen of the top 25 attendance leaders experienced an increase through five weeks compared to 2013. Only 12 of the top 25 leaders in 2013 at this point had an increase from 2012.

The bad news: Many other FBS schools continue to struggle to fill seats. Outside of the top 25 attendance leaders, crowds for the remaining Power 5-conference schools are down 3 percent from 2013.

TV is a culprit, of course.  So are neutral site games, which, as Solomon notes, “are continuing to increase and can produce more attractive games than season ticket-holders sometimes pay for on campus.”  You’d think that would be a pretty clear hint about what the problem might be, but expecting athletic directors to use logic about the problem is evidently too much to hope for.

Besides, why worry about scheduling when you’ve got Mickey Mouse?

Increasingly, athletic departments are turning to Mickey Mouse for help on how to create a magical football experience.

Numerous schools have used the Disney Institute to reassess their football game experience. The Disney Institute is the professional development arm of The Walt Disney Company that gets hired by many industries, including healthcare, aviation, government/military, food/beverage and retail. The Disney Institute declined to identify or list the number of athletic departments that have worked with the company.

Mickey on the front end and ESPN on the back end.  College football, you’re doomed.

77 Comments

Filed under College Football, ESPN Is The Devil

“The sensitivity is at an all-time high.”

Gah, this is repellent.

In April, Missouri star Dorial Green-Beckham busted into the home of his girlfriend with such force that he broke through the drywall surrounding the door. He pushed one of her roommates down four stairs, according to a police report of the incident, and then the 6-foot-6, 225-pound wide receiver dragged his girlfriend out of the apartment by her neck.

Missouri kicked Green-Beckham off the team but he was never charged with a crime. His girlfriend’s roommate declined to press charges, saying she feared the backlash from fans and attention from the media. Police called Green-Beckham’s girlfriend “extremely uncooperative,” and police records show she texted her roommate: “Football really is all he has going for him, and pressing charges would ruin it for him completely.”

Three months later, Green-Beckham was accepted at Oklahoma, getting a fresh start with one of the most successful football programs in the country. It was a move that Sooners athletic director Joe Castiglione admitted the school would be unlikely to repeat today. “If someone presented a case like that now, I think you would be fair to say that he probably wouldn’t be at Oklahoma,” Castiglione said.

“Probably”.  Gah, indeed.

The only thing that’s changed between then and now was the emergence of the Ray Rice tape.  Castiglione is basically admitting that Green-Beckham’s behavior in and of itself wasn’t a deal breaker.  It’s just that the optics are worse now.

Castiglione stressed that Oklahoma didn’t regret admitting Green-Beckham. His stance that OU may not take Green-Beckham now is simply reflective of how the scrutiny level has changed. “Just because of the attention and the cases now in the public consciousness, the university would have been unlikely to take on a situation like that,” Castiglione said.

My only question is whether that passes the Auburn test.

47 Comments

Filed under College Football, Crime and Punishment