Category Archives: Crime and Punishment

Gone, gone, gone.

In case you were wondering…

And just so we’re clear, a dismissal means Taylor is free to go anywhere his heart desires.

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62 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, Georgia Football

“Youthful hijinks”, “second chance” or “he’s a different person since then”?

I’m just trying to figure out the excuse that will be used by his next head coach on national signing day, 2016.

13 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, Recruiting

Tuesday lunch buffet

A little later in the day, but just as tasty.

  • John Pennington argues that the SEC Network may actually work against national exposure for the conference’s schools at first.  I understand the point he’s trying to make, but I think he forgets that SEC schools have benefited from national exposure on CBS for many years now.
  • Here’s a nice Xs-and-Os preview of the Clemson-Georgia game.  The author thinks it’ll be “all about Clemson’s ferocious defensive line vs. Georgia’s all-world backfield.”  Agree or disagree?
  • Phil Steele has nine sets of power ratings he uses to evaluate teams.  One of those sets has Georgia going undefeated; another four call for an 11-1 season.
  • College football players want NCAA Football 15 back.
  • Bobby Petrino compares the ACC Atlantic to the SEC West.  I guess that’s his way of telling Louisville fans not to expect any division titles.
  • Jimbo Fisher said Jameis Winston was not subject to more discipline for shoplifting seafood at a supermarket in April, because, as he was punished by the baseball coach, double jeopardy attached (“… you don’t punish a guy twice for the same crime.”).  Kinda like a Law and Order episode minus the Lennie Briscoe quip.
  • Be still, mine heart.

29 Comments

Filed under Clemson: Auburn With A Lake, Crime and Punishment, Fall and Rise of Bobby Petrino, Georgia Football, PAWWWLLL!!!, Phil Steele Makes My Eyes Water, SEC Football, Strategery And Mechanics, The NCAA

You know what they say…

When one door closes at Georgia, thirteen other doors open across the SEC.

A man putting his hands on a woman like that is inexcusable.  A football player doing that is scary.  And a football player on his second chance after an embarrassing arrest just a few months ago doing that is effing clueless.

76 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, Georgia Football

Question for Kirk Herbstreit

Do we count this person

According to an incident report released to the AJC on Monday, UGA Police were dispatched to Rooker Hall in the East Campus Village area of campus in reference to a burglary that occurred in Busbee Hall early Saturday morning. Two female residents who are also UGA athletes reported they were awakened about 7:30 a.m. Saturday when an unknown black male entered their unlocked residence without permission and stole a wallet containing credit cards and an iPhone5 cell phone.

Williamson said an investigation of the incident and previous night’s activities led to the identification of the suspect. By the time the police contacted UGA football administrators, the suspect had already left campus to return to Florida.

… as a future Auburn player if he’s merely a football recruit who was attending a prospect camp and not actually enrolled at Georgia?

26 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, Georgia Football, Recruiting

Type “Mark Richt lost control” into Google and you will get roughly 29,000 results.

Here’s something I never thought I’d see appear in print:

Saban and Richt want the same thing when it comes to keeping players on the right track and on the right side of the law. But for at least one day and one offseason, the coach we expected to play the role of disciplinarian was not the one who showed up to take the stage.

Aight.

15 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, Georgia Football, Nick Saban Rules

Another year, another Richt narrative?

I get that Georgia’s drug policy is less tolerant than most schools.  I also get that Richt strongly supports it, to the point that he’s willing to accept the consequences of being tougher than others. He reiterated that at SEC Media Days, when he said,

“No, we’re not worried about that part of it,” Richt said. “We don’t want our guys to do drugs, okay? I don’t want my son to do drugs. We’ve got policies that are stronger maybe than some when it comes to the punitive part of it. That’s kind of what everybody talks about. Georgia ends up suspending their guys a little bit sooner in the policy, which I’ve got no problems with.”

The same can be said for Richt’s stance on player transfers.

Richt also reiterated his philosophy on granting players the right to transfer wherever they like. He was asked about it in the aftermath of the rash of offseason departures that saw two key players go to Louisville and another to Auburn.

“When guys leave our program, my goal for them is that they continue their career and they continue and realize all their dreams,” Richt said. “Life’s too short. They’re young men that make mistakes. If somewhere along the way you learn from your mistake, you turn it around, finish your career strong, I’m happy for the guy.”

After that, things got a little fuzzy.  First, Nick Saban, who’s dealing with his own rash of player problems, followed Richt with his philosophy, which I suppose was supposed to come off as a justification for some tough love, but instead sounded a little like he was pointing fingers.  (The irony of Saban having a former Georgia player on his roster isn’t lost on me.)

“I want you to know that there’s not one player, not one player, since I’ve been a head coach that I kicked off the team that ever went anywhere and amounted to anything and accomplished anything, playing or academically,” Saban said. “That’s not always the answer. Discipline is not punishment. Punishment is only effective when it can help change somebody’s behavior.

“When you have a family and you have someone in your family who disappoints you, we certainly can’t kick them out of our family. I think we have to try to support them, teach them, get them to do the right things because we love them, we care about them.”

I wasn’t the only one who got that impression, either.

It’s puzzling, because I’m not really sure what Saban wanted to accomplish with his stance, other than to try to state a case for why he feels his players may be entitled to more second chances than players at other programs.  And if that’s all that was about, it’s hard to understand why he felt the need to justify that to the media in the first place.

Needless to say, some in the media took the ball and ran with it in one direction.

Maybe Saban will take a cue from the SEC coach once excoriated for disciplinary problems — Georgia’s Mark Richt.

Richt actually seems harder on crime than ever. The Bulldogs dismissed safeties Tray Matthews and Josh Harvey-Clemons this offseason.

“Just because we’ve got guys suspended isn’t evidence we have a discipline problem,” Richt said. “It’s evidence that we discipline our players. It’s evidence there’s accountability. … Sometimes when you make part of your discipline playing time, it becomes a very public thing. Some of your dirty laundry gets out there in public. I’m willing to take that risk if the process will help these guys grow into men. If we ignore stuff they do and act like it didn’t happen and sweep it under the rug, let them get away with it or whatever, what are we teaching? We are setting them up for failure down the road.”

And that’s certainly one way of looking at it, although Saban didn’t sound like someone waiting for a cue.

But there was also this strange take from SI’s Andy Staples and Zac Ellis, which took a mash-up of the two themes and actually posed the question whether Richt’s morality is interfering with the success of the program.  (It also glosses over the fact that Richt has no control over where a dismissed player lands, but we’ll leave that for another day.)

The thing is, for all this supposed strictness, all the players cited on that clip received second chances at Georgia.  So where’s the sweet spot supposed to be? It sure beats me, but you can bet Richt won’t hear the last of this if Georgia doesn’t at least get to the SECCG this season.

53 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, Georgia Football, Media Punditry/Foibles, Nick Saban Rules

“A teachable moment”

What do you figure the over/under will be for the number of times that phrase is uttered, typed or otherwise trotted out this week at SEC Media Days?

And too bad, C.J. Uzomah.  You knew the job was dangerous when you took it.

14 Comments

Filed under Auburn's Cast of Thousands, Crime and Punishment

Eliminate the middleman.

The thing I admire the most about the Nick Marshall pot citation story is the goddamned ruthless efficiency behind it.  Gus doesn’t have to spend any time waiting for a dismissal or juggling Auburn’s roster to add another quarterback to it, because Nick’s already on the Auburn roster.

It’s like bringing HUNH principles to roster management.

25 Comments

Filed under Auburn's Cast of Thousands, Crime and Punishment

The most Georgia story ever? There’s only one catch.

It doesn’t involve a player from Georgia.

Florida State football player Jesus Wilson stole a motor scooter near the Love Building on the Florida State campus last month and crashed it, court documents said.

Wilson, 19, and now faces a charge of grand theft of a motor vehicle.

No word on whether Jimmy Williamson intends to file extradition papers.

And let me tell you something, pendejo.  Nobody

12 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment