Category Archives: The Body Is A Temple

Friday morning buffet

Mmm, mmm good.

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Filed under Coach O Needs Another Red Bull, Georgia Football, It's Just Bidness, Strategery And Mechanics, The Body Is A Temple, The NCAA

Tuesday morning buffet

Lots of weirdness in the buffet today.

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Filed under Big Ten Football, Gators, Gators..., Georgia Football, SEC Football, The Body Is A Temple, Wit And Wisdom From The Hat

Monday morning buffet

Get you a plate and dig in.

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Filed under Big 12 Football, Big Ten Football, Georgia Football, Look For The Union Label, Pac-12 Football, SEC Football, Strategery And Mechanics, The Body Is A Temple, The Evil Genius

Monday morning buffet

It’s game week.  You know you’ve got an appetite.

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Filed under 'Cock Envy, Auburn's Cast of Thousands, Clemson: Auburn With A Lake, College Football, It's Just Bidness, Nick Saban Rules, Pac-12 Football, SEC Football, Stats Geek!, The Body Is A Temple

One step past swinging a pickaxe

Here’s a fascinating piece by Chris Brown (no surprise, that) on Chip Kelly’s impact on the NFL.  He’s only been in the league one year, but he’s already exercising an outsized influence in a place that lives to copy cat.

But it’s not just his play calling that’s getting followed.  There are a couple of other items that Kelly’s been closed mouthed about that others are trying to emulate.  One of those is how the Eagles use sports science.  Brown lists what we know about that:

• While coaching at Oregon, Kelly began investing significantly in sports science, both by bringing in outside consultants and by developing in-house expertise and technology. He built principally on research first conducted for Australian-rules football.

• Many of those studies, which have since been expanded to cover a range of sports, used heart rate, GPS, accelerometers, and gyroscope monitors worn by players in practice to determine how to train for peak game-day performance3 and how to prevent injuries.4 These studies also tracked the movements that players made in games5 so teams could mold practices and training to what players did on an individualized and position-by-position basis.

• When Kelly arrived in Philadelphia, the Eagles invested huge sums into their sports science infrastructure, and Kelly hired Shaun Huls, a sports science coordinator who’d worked for the Navy Special Warfare Command for nearly five years, training SEALs and focusing on reducing the incidence of their noncombat injuries.6

• Kelly’s team uses the latest wearable player-tracking technology, and his staff monitors the resulting data in real time to determine how players should train and when they become injury risks. “On an individualized basis we may back off,” Kelly said recently. “We may take [tight end] Brent Celek out of a team period on a Tuesday afternoon and just say, because of the scientific data we have on him, ‘We may need to give Brent a little bit of a rest.’ We monitor them very closely.”

Does it work?  Well, as Brown notes, the Eagles finished last season with the second-fewest injuries in the NFL.  And, perhaps as importantly, the players sound like they believe in the regime.

Would it translate to college ball?  Don’t forget where Kelly came from:  “We used the same formula at Oregon and I spent a lot of time on how to go about it, how we think you should train, and it worked for us there and it worked for us here.”

How ’bout Athens?  I have no idea, but do find this comment worth noting:

Kelly’s chief commitment isn’t to running a no-huddle offense; his goal is for the Eagles to be a no-huddle organization. For Kelly, the benefits extend far beyond the effect on opposing defenses. “One of the benefits we have from practice and the no-huddle offense, where every period is no-huddle, is our second and third [teams] — and I’ve gone back and charted this — get almost twice as many reps as other teams I’ve been at when you’re sitting in the second or third spot,” explained Eagles defensive coordinator Billy Davis, a longtime NFL veteran. That has a recruiting benefit when it comes to attracting backup players, which in turn helps the Eagles discover hidden gems. “If you’re [second or third string], you want to be in our camp because you get more reps than anyone else,” said Kelly. “Because of the reps we get in practice, our guys get a chance to develop a little more. You go to some teams and the threes aren’t getting many reps — they are losing time compared to our guys.”

That does sound a bit similar to how Richt and his staff have reconfigured reps in practice this preseason.  So maybe there’s hope elsewhere.

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Filed under The Body Is A Temple

Getting pounded: it must be mid-preseason camp.

Damn, Reggie. (AJC photo by Chip Towers)

Athens is Walking Wounded City today. Per Chip Towers:

  • The most notable new injury appears to be Reggie Davis. The sophomore wide receiver had his left hand completely clubbed up in a cast. No details on the severity and/or extend of the injury — hopefully coach Mark Richt will provide some when he speaks to reporters after the morning practice — but obviously it’s never good to see that at a position required to use those hands on every play.

  • Lots of green, non-contact jerseys among the receiving corps, including Isaiah McKenzie, Chris Conley, Kenneth Towns, Justin Scott-Wesley and walkon Clay Johnson. There was good news at that position, however, as Jonathan Rumph was back in a regular jersey and looks to be fully cleared.

  • Some more good news on the injury front: Cornerback Shattle Fenteng is out of green and back to practicing full speed and all of Georgia’s tight ends were a full go without limitations, including frequent absentee Jordan Davis.

  • Another new member of the green jersey club, at least from my observation, is outside linebacker Davin Bellamy. But he was fully dressed out and appeared to be participating. He’s out for the first two games via suspension for his DUI arrest this summer. Safety Dominick Sanders remained in green.

  • Fullback Merritt Hall was not on the field at all this morning, and there is increasing evidence that he may be out for a while. That starts with the fact that Detric Bing-Dukes said yesterday that his move to fullback from inside linebacker is for the entire season.

  • Speaking of the fullbacks, the order in which running backs coach Bryan McClendon was working them Wednesday was senior walkon Taylor Maxey with the first team, followed by fellow walkons Cameron Faulkner and Christian Payne and then finally Bing-Dukes.

  • The Bulldogs were missing noseguard Chris Mayes and Lamont Gaillard again this morning. Mayes’ absence should start becoming a bit of a concern at this point. Georgia hasn’t said what his malady is but he, too, has had past problems with concussions.

Man, that’s dizzying.  Can’t make Pruitt’s task any easier, either.

And this just popped up on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/FieldStForum/status/499594938599104512

I sure hate to hear that.  Sincerely hope there are no long-term consequences for Hall.

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Filed under Georgia Football, The Body Is A Temple

The NCAA’s concussion settlement

It’s hardly more than a good start, if that.  The NCAA puts up $70 million in a fund that can be accessed by players to screen as to whether any suffer head-injury problems, but no money is set aside for actual damages.  Instead, any player with issues will have to sue to collect compensation.

There are some agreed to mandates on current policy…

– Preseason baseline testing for every athlete for each season in which he or she competes

– Prohibition from return to play on the same day an athlete is diagnosed with a concussion. Generally accepted medical protocols recommend athletes not return to play the same day if they exhibit signs of a concussion or are diagnosed with one, but a 2010 survey of certified athletic trainers conducted by the NCAA found that nearly half reported that athletes had returned to play the same day.

– Requirement that medical personnel be present for all games and available for practices for all contact sports, defined in the settlement as football, lacrosse, wrestling, ice hockey, field hockey, soccer and basketball. Those personnel must be trained in the diagnosis, treatment and management of concussions.

– Implementation of concussion tracking in which schools will report concussions and their resolution

– Requirement that schools provide NCAA-approved training to athletes, coaches and athletic trainers before each season

– Education for faculty on the academic accommodations needed for students with concussions

… but also a question as to how far those mandates go.

Huma told ESPN the settlement also falls short of protecting current players because it does not mandate new return-to-play protocols. Instead, the NCAA and the plaintiffs agreed that remaining guidelines for schools and the implementation of those guidelines are subject to the NCAA’s rule-making process.

“And we know what the regular NCAA rule-making process is like. It could take years, or they could shoot it down,” Huma said. “The settlement represents yet another refusal of the NCAA to protect players from unnecessary brain trauma. Instead of agreeing to rules that protect players’ brains by reducing contact in practices and mandatory return-to-play protocols, such protections would remain optional.”

He has a point about the NCAA’s rule-making process.

And one other thing – that $70 million isn’t all for screening.

The NCAA, which in the settlement denied the plaintiffs’ allegations, agreed not to oppose attorneys’ fees up to $15 million. Those fees and expenses would come out of the $75 million assigned for medical monitoring and research.

So, progress of a sort, at best.  And the agreement still has to be approved by the court.  In other words, this one has a long way to go.

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Filed under The Body Is A Temple, The NCAA