Oversigning: turning a bug into a feature.

Lord, this is a devious suggestion (which is why I approve of it, of course):

… This disconnect between theory and practice is better legislated at the conference level. Far from ensuring the SEC maintains a competitive advantage, it offers a chance for conferences to create their own competitive advantages. While some may call it negative recruiting, there’s nothing morally wrong or impermissible about informing prospects and their parents/guardians that one conference offers more protections to student-athletes than another.

If that idea gained traction, it could turn around the race to the bottom. Imagine if conferences got creative:

  • A rule that allowed for an appeal to the conference office when a scholarship is cancelled or not renewed.
  • A rule requiring conference schools to renew scholarships within the first week of school, almost creating two-year scholarships.
  • A rule limiting the ability of conference schools to refuse permission to contact other schools under certain conditions

If every change is quickly reduced to a national rule, there is no way for conferences to differentiate themselves. And with the passage of Connecticut House Bill 5145 to go along with California’s AB 2079, we’re getting close to providing prospects with the tools necessary to make an informed choice between these different options.

We don’t find it to be a problem if one state has lower taxes but another state has cheaper health care and better roads. Both are taking different approaches to the same goal: attracting people and businesses. Solve the baseline national problem, and then give conferences the incentive to develop more student-athlete friendly rules.

Let’s see how Nick Saban would deal with that.

Okay, I’m being a little tongue-in-cheek here (Brian Cook thinks Infante’s proposal is full of fail because recruits’ egos get in the way of logic, for example), but seriously, why don’t Big Ten schools use the SEC’s oversigning policy as a recruiting tool instead of just whining about it?

14 Comments

Filed under Recruiting

14 responses to “Oversigning: turning a bug into a feature.

  1. lrgk9

    The parents will see the difference.
    However, the value add of Saban trained mental toughness has cost us a recruit or two because the parents have bought in as well.

    Like

    • AthensHomerDawg

      The parents or the parent , mentor, guardian, role model, preacher running the boys club on the payroll of the football program. Gets dicey.

      Like

  2. Bulldog Joe

    If this is true, what is to stop smaller states (where college sports provide a more significant percentage of state tourism revenue) from going the other way, creating “laws” which tilt the competitive advantage to the in-state schools?

    Like

      • Go Dawgs!

        Tripling the taxes on families who send their boys to play for schools out of state! That’ll learn ’em!

        Like

      • Bulldog Joe

        An example being any of the grant-in-aid provisions or restrictions currently laid out by the NCAA or the conference.

        If some states can make more strict provisions or disclosure requirements (such as the examples above) than the NCAA or conferences have, can other states make provisions less strict than the NCAA or conferences?

        In the state courts, who wins out, state law or the NCAA?

        Like

        • Wouldn’t the most obvious consequence of a state relaxing an NCAA reg and a school then following the looser standard be for the NCAA to sanction the school for failing to comply with NCAA rules? What could a state do about that?

          Like

          • Mayor of Dawgtown

            Go to court in that state and obtain a permanent injunction against the NCAA with monetary penalties for non-compliance by the NCAA with state law which would then open the door to seizure of NCAA financial assets in that state for a start. Passage of a law making it a crime to violate the state mandated looser reg as a follow-up.

            Like

            • Right. Sure.

              What NCAA financial assets are you planning on seizing, Mayor? The revenues it collects from March Madness (there really isn’t much else)? Nobody will have a problem with that.

              And then you’ll criminalize tougher regulations? That’ll be a real winner, too.

              I think the technical term for this is crazy talk.

              Like

              • Mayor of Dawgtown

                Tell it to all the cities and states that are now collecting taxes from professional athletes because one sixteenth of their income (or whatever the percentage) came from playing a game in that city/state. England, as I understand it, is taking the position that if a pro golfer plays in the British Open he has to pay as income tax not only a percentage of his winnings from that tournament but also a percentage of his endorsements calculated by the amount of his British Open winnings compared to his winnings in all tournaments. Crazy talk, indeed.

                Like

                • Mayor, what has that got to do with your hypothetical? Remember, we’re talking about a state deciding to undercut NCAA recruiting regs to gain an advantage for its native schools. And in the name of that, you’re prepared to seize assets and throw people in jail?

                  C’mon, man, get real here.

                  Like

                • Mayor of Dawgtown

                  My point is that they are the government and can do anything that they want to do. Then it becomes the problem of those affected to try to get the law declared void, unconstitutional, etc. Never underestimate the power of government bureaucrats to make life hell.

                  Like

                • Mayor of Dawgtown

                  P.S. “I think the technical term for this is crazy talk.” Not any crazier than suggesting that the NCAA, a private corporation, can simply ignore the mandate of state laws passed by a duly constituted state legislature and signed by that state’s governor.

                  Like

  3. Dog in Fla

    “Let’s see how Nick Saban would deal with that.”

    Nick doesn’t have time to think about that but if he did, his first thought would be: “What can this do to make my college experience better?”

    Like