Schottenheimer, from the St. Louis point of view

The Post-Dispatch paints a picture of a coach who wants to get back to the South for family reasons and who still harbors ambitions of running a program of his own.

Tell me this doesn’t sound like a Richt kind of guy.

“When you look at what’s important to us as we get older, it’s that you’re around your loved ones,” Schottenheimer said. “And you’re around people that you care about.

“Especially in this profession when we spend so much time at the office, and commit so much of our time to our profession and our passion, you want your family to be happy. And quite honestly, I’m also looking forward to trying to be a mentor and a guide to some young kids. And I see myself certainly, always have, as more than just a football coach.”

Also, make sure you listen to the video clip with the beat writer, especially when he discusses the Rams offense.  Sure sounds like what Richt wants to do.

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UPDATE:  Another take here.

During Schottenheimer’s three seasons as Fisher’s offensive coordinator here, I never forgot that Schotty was running the offense that the boss wanted him to run.

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UPDATE #2:  You may also be interested in reading MaconDawg’s Q&A with SBNation’s Rams bloggers.

94 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

94 responses to “Schottenheimer, from the St. Louis point of view

  1. Russ

    I know it’s all we really have to go on, but I’m hesitant to judge him on his pro record. If that’s the case, then Saban and the Ol’ Ball Sack are terrible coaches. To me, it sounds like Schotty wants the kind of environment and opportunity that Richt is offering, and if he’s happy in that situation, it can often result in good job performance. We’ll see, I guess.

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  2. He is cut from the same cloth as CMR. God, others, and CF…..AKA The GEORGIA WAY.

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  3. This was my guess from the start. I haven’t seen how many kids he has but are there many places in America that would be better to raise your kids? We’re so close we don’t see it but no one wants to leave Athens if (a) they don’t have to,I graduated damnit,or (b)they don’t double your salary to induce you to leave. All our old Coaches hang around.Dooley, Goff and Donanan all live in the Athens area don’t they? At a Q &A with Dooley I once asked him how close he came to returning to coach Auburn and he said he thought about it but Barbara and the kids did not want to leave Athens. It’s a better draw than most of us realize.

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    • JCDAWG83

      I guess the love of Athens is so strong no one even attempts to hire our former head coaches? Dooley hung around as AD, so he wasn’t going to be hired as a head coach anywhere, Goff and Donnan never even got a sniff from another program.

      Richt will stay until he retires so the tradition of Georgia being the last coaching job will continue.

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      • Bulldog Joe

        Auburn attempted to hire Coach Dooley to replace Doug Barfield as head coach.

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      • Oklahoma and Auburn made runs at Dooley; UNC made a run at Donnan after the 1997 season.

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        • Russ

          Don’t let facts get in the way of a good rant.

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        • 81Dog

          Didn’t UK make a run at Donnan after he was released by UGA? Like, a couple of years later?

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          • Yes. And Rutgers had a flirtation with Ray Goff after he was fired.

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            • Mayor

              After Donnan’s second season at UGA which was 10-2 Oklahoma went after him. He was the former OC there and I believe was OC when OK won one of their MNCs. Donnan stayed at UGA, which raised his salary to keep him.

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              • 81Dog

                Donnan was the OC when Troy Aikman began the season as the starter and when Aikman broke his leg, JD took a guy named Charles Thompson, put him at QB, retooled his offense to go back to old school Sooner option ball, and won a national championship. Thompson was so successful, Aikman decided to transfer to UCLA.

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                • AusDawg85

                  LOL! Dammit guys…slow down! How can a 15%er get a chance to rip Richt and our entire program if you’re going to keep disputing made-up criticism?

                  For those of you following along at home, this counts as being a Disney Dawg while insulting someone’s realistic point of view. Please add this to the metrics score. Thanks, dude.

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      • Had Donnan taken the NC job mentioned below he would have been the third highest paid coach in the country at that time based on what was reportedly offered.

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    • 3rdandGrantham

      As someone who is born/raised near Athens, graduated from UGA and mostly stayed in the area until my early/mid 30’s, IMO Athens certainly is better than many areas of the country, but there also are still many areas that easily trump Athens when it comes to family life, raising kids, outdoor/cultural options, and the rest. For me personally, leaving Athens for good in ’10 was emotionally tough, but looking back it was among the best decisions I’ve ever made, and I’m far, far happier these days as a result. My wife/kids feel the same.

      For example, Bobo’s new stomping ground of Ft. Collins is far superior to Athens in terms of overall quality of family life offered. Your examples essentially are comparing Athens to Auburn, Moultrie, and Huntington, WV, respectively. Not exactly the most exciting relocation destinations by any stretch.

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      • Turn in your Bulldog card for saying anywhere is better than Athens and go wash your mouth out with soap. 🙂

        As someone who moved out of state, Athens is still in my blood. I can’t imagine living somewhere like Ft. Collins about as far away from my extended family (South Georgia) as I can think of or where I can’t get back between the hedges when I want.

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        • Crotchety

          Agreed. I’ve lived everywhere. Europe for 4 years; Michigan (the “big house” is overrated), Illinois, Southern California. Wife is from coastal Virginia.

          No place like Athens. It’s why we’ve lived here since the mid-90’s and both work here at UGA. No place like it.

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      • Debby Balcer

        It depends on what you want to do in Ft Collins. I have lived in Colorado and it is beautiful and there are lots of winter activities but the south is home so we moved back. Winters are great if you like winter sports but if not it is long and cold. We often had cold weather from Halloween to Easter. Summer is too short.

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        • 3rdandGrantham

          I spent a ‘normal’ winter there about 10 years ago and assumed I’d freeze to death. Instead, it easily trumped north Georgia as it was sunny most days with highs in the upper 40’s to low 50’s. With the sunny skies and higher altitude, 50 there in the winter felt like 60, so I loved it. The occasional snowstorm was a bonus, as I grew up rarely experiencing snow, so that too was a plus.

          I’m big into skiing, mountain biking, hiking, and the like, so naturally Ft. Collins easily trumps Athens in my book.

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          • Debby Balcer

            We loved in Colrado Springs for four and a half years and my mom’s family is from Colorado. The cold is dry but it still last forever. My kids went trick or treating in snow and hunted eggs in snow and my sister even graduated from high school outside with flurries the end of May. You don’t have snow on the ground all winter like you do in the Chicago area but winter is long and there is not much summer, spring, or fall. My parents live there and love it but after we lived back in GA visits to CO are enough for me.

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        • Mayor

          The coldest winter I ever had was a summer in San Francisco. (Literally as well as figuratively)

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  4. charlottedawg

    People who talk about the importance of family are people who can’t cut it career wise.

    Relationships and “work life balance” are not going to pay the alimony to my ex wives, only cold hard cash.

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    • And, people who talk about the importance of cold hard cash are people who can’t cut it family wise.

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    • 3rdandGrantham

      work life balance, or lack thereof, is often what leads to alimony payments down the road. My divorced friends all share a common trait: a stronger marriage to their career than to their husband/wife/family.

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      • Jack Klompus

        Yep. Small town, tight knit group and good support system keeps everyone in the family happy, momma, kids, dogs, etc when Daddy ain’t around. Bobo said the exact things in his press conference.

        Go Dawgs.

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    • Joe Schmoe

      All I can say is WOW your perspective is fucked up. If you are suggesting that you would only hire people who sacrifice their family / personal lives for work, then your definition of success is totally different than mine. You also seem to suggest that the only way to be fully successful is to sacrifice your family – another PoV that my personal career has proven to be totally in accurate. In fact, I find that people who are able to balance their work and personal lives are happier and more productive employees.

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    • ATL Dawg

      As an alum and fan watching these guys rake in millions, I get irritated when they start talking about work-life balance. You want work-life balance? Go get a job that pays 50k a year. Or even 100k a year.

      CMR has been paid somewhere in the neighborhood of $45 million from UGA over the last 14 years. There’s nothing worse than we he starts pontificating on “more important things”.

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      • Really? You think he should act like there aren’t more important things than winning football games. Everyone deserves to have balance in their life whether they work in a low-paying job, they are the CEO of a Fortune 500 company, or the head coach of a successful football program. Work-life balance doesn’t mean 40 hours a week, but it means being successful at work and at home.

        Using your logic, he should live at the office, never see his family and friends, not care what his players become, and force his coaches who are earning hundreds of thousands to act the same way. He should insist on making the rules his way to maximize the opportunity for his team to win. That’s how you end up with guys like Aaron Hernandez in your past.

        If the University of Georgia didn’t think he was doing the job he’s been paid $45 million to do, he would have been run out of town years ago.

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      • Russ

        As an alum and fan of this program, I’m glad when I read that Coach Richt places college football in what I consider the proper perspective.

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        • 81Dog

          having a proper perspective on the importance of college football doesn’t mean CMR can’t do his job. Some people would argue that a guy who has balance in his life, and a little perspective, is able to do his job better.

          There are always going to be grinders, and there are going to be talented flakes, and there are going to be people who seem to be really good at their jobs without a lot of visible effort. If putting 120 hours a week was all it took to be a winner, there would be plenty of Nick Sabans. If being a smart ass who liked golf more than he liked watching film was all it took, there’d be plenty of Steve Spurriers. It’s not like baking a cake. The ingredients that go into making a winner are varied, and volatile, and not easily repeatable by different people in different circumstances.

          That doesn’t mean there aren’t lessons to be learned, or skill sets that can be taught, or common traits that improve or lessen one’s chances. But usually not one thing or the other. Different mixtures can produce similar results.

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    • charlottedawg

      If Mark Richt was more committed to his job as opposed to his family we would’ve won multiple CHAMPIONSHIPS by now. The fact that Pruitt is the only divorced guy on the staff speaks volumes as to where our coaching staff’s focus is, or more importantly isn’t!

      You’ve probably figured out by now, I meant these two comments completely tongue in cheek. I am glad but not at all surprised to see the witty responses from fellow commenters at GTP.

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    • Mayor

      That sir, is why you have ex-wives and alimony obligations.

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  5. Scorpio Jones, III

    “People who talk about the importance of family are people who can’t cut it career wise.”

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    • Yikes! “People who don’t make the importance of family a priority are people who can’t cut it marriage wise.”

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    • pete

      Wow. Suddenly I feeling a little worthless…career wise that is. I thought the main point of my career was to provide for my family. Silly me.

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      • gastr1

        Depends on the career you have. One of the main points of any career is obviously to earn money, but there are some careers that have pretty important constituencies on the other end….pastor, teacher, certain kinds of scientific research, things like that. If your kid’s teacher told you that your kid was less important to them than their paycheck for the fam back at home, you’d prolly not be ready to find a teacher who cared about the people in their classroom a little more.

        I submit that Saban is a mercenary coach who cares more about winning than about the education and mentoring of his players. That’s one of the reasons I like Richt and want him and people like him as our coach (and would want him coaching my kid–even though I am not religious).

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        • gastr1

          –i.e., I think Richt cares as much about his players as he does about his own family (and both are more important than his paycheck and what he can “provide”).

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        • pete

          Point well taken. I understand the point that some people have jobs with higher callings than the paycheck that provides for family. I guess I was a little narrow-minded in my approach. I’m a little bit self-serving in my life style. I wasn’t thinking of those that live and work with a servant’s attitude.

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  6. too early for this much cynicism….they all are free men and have not insignificant bank accounts so they could easily move almost where ever they want but they DIDN’T. It is not necessary that they have to move to follow a new coaching job. Dooley was from Mobile and actually was doing significant consulting with Kennesaw State , could have moved either place. I believe Donnan was from N.C. could have moved back there and used his home connections there.Goff was from South Ga. and would be able to do all the hunting he wants down there and he does own enough Zaxby’s franchises he could move to anywhere he wanted but people who can stat in Athens appear to exercise that option.

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    • That’s a fair assessment. Both my sons were born in Athens and went to UGa. They’ve both answered the question from out of state students: “You’ve live here all your life why not go to a different school in another state?” They answer with “I’m here for the same reasons you are. Great school in a great town. Walked all over campus as a kid. Didn’t feel the need to escape from my parents.”

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      • 3rdandGrantham

        While I can certainly see that, IMO its important to experience different areas of the country in effort to gain a broader overall perspective, which almost certainly will pique your interest in other things you never thought fathomable. There’s a saying that I totally subscribe to: the less you’ve traveled, the more sure you are. As I’ve told relatives who were afraid to leave the nest, so to speak—you can always return home, so get out there and broaden your horizons outside of your comfort zone and overall perception of other locales.

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        • Your point is well taken. My father was in SAC. I’ve lived in 3 states,Europe and Asia. I’ve worked and lived in Africa and Central America. I’m much richer for the exposure but I missed having a house and I hated leaving friends. Because of my brides profession and lengthy education we were early thirties when our first son was born. We’ve been together since HS and we threw ourselves into house and family here in Athens. My oldest son is following in his mom’s footsteps and still has a lot of education in front of him. His career will take him from Athens as a necessity, my youngest too. Going to Georgia was a big deal for both of them. A lot of memories and strong ties here. One day they will move on. I don’t look forward to it, but I do encourage it. 😉

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          • Dog in Fla

            And I don’t want to hear how good the nightlife was in Ferkessédougou although I’m sure it was better than what was available in Diego Garcia

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            • I’m guessing all the French girls were gone by your tour. C’est la guerre. 😉 Be glad you didn’t join the Coast Guard and then draw the Johnson Island atoll. I imagine it was pretty safe there except for the toxic waste.

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              • Dog in Fla

                That gives me a chance for what I believe to be the best Coast Guard joke ever:

                I was NPQ [not physically qualified] for the Coast Guard.
                Why?
                I wasn’t 6 feet tall so I could walk to shore in case my cutter sunk.

                [General laughter and merriment ensue except, of course, for Coasties who have no sense of humor because they have to risk their lives keeping drunks from drowning]

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        • Debby Balcer

          I am an Army brat and have moved my entire life. My husband was in the military and we moved with his career too and even after he got out we moved. Living all over the place is overrated in my opinion. I have lived in Germany, Hawaii, California, Washington State, Arizona, Colorado, Texas North Carolina, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida and South Carolina. I love this part of the country for four seasons. I have lived big city to little town and what you find is what you bring with you. I don’t live in Athens but my daughter taught there after college. It is a great place to live. We live in Greenville SC now and will probably be here forever.

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          • WOW. You got around … And I thought I traveled.

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            • Debby Balcer

              As a kid we moved every year so I went to a different elementary school every year. I went to two junior highs but only one high school ARC in Augusta Georgia. The longest I have lived anywhere is Augusta 7 years one time and fifteen years the last time. Georgia is my home state by choice even though I live in Greenville SC now.

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      • ClydeBoogie

        Lived there for 19 years partied with Herschel and Dominique. Herschel could moonwalk his ass off Nique couldn’t dance to save his life, stayed on his girl’s toes on the dance floor. Worked at the Varsity as a teen(the fastest hot dawg man in the south I might add! heh heh) loved everyday of it.

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        • Dog in Fla

          Did not know that about Herschel and Dominique but did party with Snake Stabler at Summerdale Supper Club, Lefty’s, Flora-Bama and into the woods. Lived to tell about it

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          • Cojones

            Yep. You partied with “The Snake” alright.

            Pop Quiz: Do any of you service brats remember a UGA D player who finished his service obligation before playing CFB? Army, early to middle sixties. Bill Stanfill was his D teammate at Georgia.

            A vet friend of mine who was becoming a barrister, and I, used to step out with our wives to the “Goat Club” or “Army-Navy Union (Club)” in the sticks near Athens where you only got in if on active duty or a vet. We saw this player there more than once in about 4 visits and contributed to his delinq…ummm…uhh….continued growth as a service vet. Don’t explain the politics, but how the hell you could get mixed drinks in a bar/grill in a dry county I’ll never know. You couldn’t even get them at the CC

            At the time we were active in trying to get Clarke Co to go wet using photos of the piles of liquor bottles at the Athens City Dump; many placed there by the A-N Union. Got it on the ballot, but we lost Ah, well, us Army vets always had a place to go while living in Athens and whenever leisure time was too short to hit Atl..

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  7. Beakerdawg

    This NFL hire sure does feels smoother than the last NFL hire. Initially, I was pumped about towel boy’s fire/brimstone but that fire was actually a raging, dumpster fire. I hope we have a teacher-type coach instead of the previous NFL-type coach coming to college because we all know how the last one turned out.

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    • Irwin R Fletcher

      There is some difference…Grantham had 3 years as a DC, was fired, and was serving as a DLine coach when UGA got him. Schott was employed as an OC and had been for the past 8-9 years. Grantham felt like a guy who needed a break and so he could afford to take a job with a coach that might be on shaky ground…I’m sure if he had shopped himself, Schott could have had his shot at several OC jobs.

      Not saying demand = future success…but just pointing out that ‘coming from the NFL’ isn’t detailed enough of a description.

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  8. No One Knows You're a Dawg

    Here’s an interesting article on the 2011 Jets based upon the book referenced in the Senator’s previous post, “Collision Low Crossers.” It discusses the team and Schottenheimer’s performance. Two things to keep in mind while reading it: 1) CBS was fired at the end of the season, and 2) the book’s author, by his own admission in another interview, got along much better with the defensive coaches and players than the one’s on offense. And the offensive and defensive staffs didn’t get along with each other.

    Should Rex Ryan be hired by Arthur Blank, and he appears to be the leading candidate, I expect this book will be required reading amongst the Atlanta sports media.

    http://www.mensjournal.com/magazine/how-a-football-team-falls-apart-20131018

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    • Dog in Fla

      Excellent article, the configuration of which is replete with a bulging convexity of an awesome plethora of football and baseball bat related maxims demonstrating reasons why Brian is here and the #karma by which Pettine now has Johnny F. Football as a starting quarterback

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  9. I like the selection of Schottenheimer for a lot reasons.

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    • Dagnabbit – you would think after all of these years I would know how to use a computer. Nevertheless …

      1. Fisher was retaining CBS as OC for next year, so as far as we know, his previous boss was happy enough with his work.
      2. He has worked with a good list of high-level professional QB’s at the NFL. I think that UGA and CMR have a distinct recruiting pitch for Pro-style QB prospects compared to others. UGA’s system and coaches prepare for the NFL.

      3. He is 9 year tenured OC at the NFL. That means a lot of knowledgeable NFL people think he can coach and call plays. CMR may direct about what he wants but we are not talking about elevating and mentoring someone who has never called plays or devised a gameplan.

      On the other side, there are few things to worry about:

      1. He has not been a full scale recruiter.
      2. Did we just put big $ into the OC at the expense of hiring an experienced D1 OL coach?
      3. How long will tenure be? I would hate for this to be a single year kind of thing.
      4. Why do I think it could a one year thing? I am surprised no one has even mentioned this in any press report:

      http://deadspin.com/rams-owner-who-just-bought-land-in-l-a-is-ignoring-st-1678213834

      I wonder if Schottenheimer chose to get out before the inevitable craptastic final season in St. Louis is unveiled for the Rams. I would suspect Kroenke will fire the entire staff and not carry their bags to LA. The last time an NFL team moved, the coaching staff didn’t go with it to Baltimore. It preferred to can a coach whose name might be Belichik.

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  10. Jack Klompus

    Senator,
    Interesting comparison between the Tweets and the article. Tweets suggest that in both NY and StL, he was handed the offense and he owned everything about it. But reading the article suggests that he was handed the offense and told what to do. If I had to guess, I’d say it’s the later of the two.
    I’m like you, I’m not jumping up in down in my chair for good or bad, it’s a hire. But, I do know that Rex Ryan is a clown and reading the article leads one to believe that Fischer’s offenses are going to suck regardless of who he hires as OC. Also, a lot of history in the corporate world has showed me that a lot of people shine when they are out from under a really shitty boss and working for a great one or working for themselves. I’m hoping it’s this and not the Grantham effect.

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  11. He’s a former QB who is now a coach. He’s the son of a coach. His family has been in football. Sound familiar?? Keeping McClendon, Ball and Lilly will hopefully keep our recruiting rolling and Schottenheimer can gamelan and Coach QBs. Honestly, this seems like the perfect hire…which is what scares the hell out of me. Sure, there are questions and concerns but could we have made a more ideal hire? I just don’t see how we could have done better and especially considering the rest of the staff is intact. I just hope he mixes it up a little as that is something Bobo got really good at even though it took a while.

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    • 69Dawg

      +1 Hell I think based on the bloggers article we just hired Bobo’s clone. I’ll bet that next fall if the fans didn’t know better they would not even realize Bobo was gone. We have a fantastic offense and we just hired an OC who IMHO was chosen because he agreed to not screw it up. I have said it earlier the O Line coach is the most important hire. We will be starting more guys with more starts than we have in my memory next year. I want a homerun O line coach’s hire.

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      • 81Dog

        so the geniuses who have been screaming for years that they knew EXACTLY what play Bobo was going to call 99% of the time will be able to make the transition without missing a beat!

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      • Mayor

        69 is right. We have to have a top-quality O-Line coach or the rest of this is for naught.

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    • Cojones

      Yep! to ail of yall

      Good example: Connor Riley wrote a column in R&B about a “confusing” and bad hire in his title, but failed to delineate exactly what he headlined.

      These kind of premature “6th sense” characterizations of a coach a writer doesn’t know and who now is an employee of the state should be followed with a huge apology. Mucking up the water we may drink from in the future is not a class statement nor is it evocative of Southern Grace. Somebody tell me what this little blue-coat opportunist is doing by welcoming the latest hire of a senior SEC Coach as if he can cast doubt about his abilities by using a fact-less basis for his headline.

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  12. ugafidelis

    But Doug in the interview with Macon Dawg said in one paragraph that his offenses can be too complex, and in another he said he was a KISS kind of coach. I’m confused.

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  13. HobnailedBoots

    This is why we’ll never win another championship. Championship coaches devote their time to winning. Richt has that way down the priority list and now he’s found another mediocre coach hiding behind the “F” word.

    But instead of demanding a better effort, many Georgia fans are applauding this complacency and expressing happiness that we don’t place championships at the top of our priorities, as if they get some kind of medal for excuses.

    Can somebody please liberate us from this cult of practiced mediocrity??? I’m sick of it.

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    • How exactly would you demand a better effort? One that would impact the way B-M is managed, I mean…

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      • HobnailedBoots

        Senator, half of our fans don’t give a damn whether Richt ever wins the SEC again or not, so long as he is our coach and they can all talk about what a great man he is at their church pancake socials. The complacency in BM reflects that. Richt gets an extension after two years which were terrible failures to capitalize on having the best team in the division. Why? Because ADGM knows the checks will keep coming from the masses of complacent evangelical fans who fall back on the “I’d rather never win a title then be criminals like Auburn!” If 75% of fans were unhappy with him, I doubt he’d be getting extensions. But it seems 50% would make excuses for him if he beheaded an infant at the 50 yard line.

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        • I’m not asking you for an assessment of fans’ attitudes. I’m asking what you think fans could do to change the way B-M operates.

          Before you say stop buying tickets, keep in mind that most people don’t have the same objections to 10-win seasons that you do.

          Even then, in the days of attendance drops after poor seasons, I never saw a real change at B-M. And now, with the TV money? Good luck with that…

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          • HobnailedBoots

            I get what you’re saying. I guess I’m just not ready to throw in the towel on this program yet. Maybe you are, idk. I’m a younger generation than you, so I don’t know this for certain, but it seems to me that if the same level of apathy had existed during Goff or Donnan’s tenure, one of them would still be coach. Everyone always points to two SEC titles and 10 win seasons, but its been TEN years since our last SEC title. I just don’t understand why Georgia, and our fans for that matter, seem so reluctant to go a different direction. Everybody eventually stagnates. For Richt, seems like it was quite a few years ago. Now our stated goal every year is to “win the East’ and do it ” the Georgia way.” Am I the only one who finds that an exceedingly low standard to set?

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          • HobnailedBoots

            Sorry, I realize i didn’t answer your question. I guess I would like fans to stop revering Richt. Maybe the money flow won’t be affected but just maybe the way B-M feels like Richt is regarded by fans would be less rosy than with the current environment of hailing him as a saint and “the only person we want” to be our coach. Would that matter? Probably not. But it might.

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  14. Mike Cooley

    I have no problem with people wanting a coaching change. That’s going to happen and there can be good arguments made for it. What I’m sick of and find utterly stupid is the argument that Richt hasn’t brought you your life affirming national title because his world view doesn’t match yours. He doesn’t win as much as you would like because he is an outspoken Christian who won’t compromise certain things and that just be the reason he hasn’t won a Championship. If he would just stop caring about those things he would break through. Brilliant. There are scores of guys who would do just about anything necessary to win a NC. How many of the. Have done it? Disagreeing with Richt in terms of offensive philosophy, willingness to try certain things etc is perfectly valid. Saying that he will never win it all because he doesn’t think like you want him to is arrogant and nonsensical. If being a self absorbed, ruthless asshole was a recipe for winning championships, Charlie Weiss would be unstoppable. Bobby Petrino would have about 20 rings. Lane Kiffin would be on track to the CFB hall of fame. Butch Jones would already have a NC. And Grantham would be a head coach. Sometimes I wish so,embody would deliver us from the cult of stupidity that is running wild in Bulldawg Nation.

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