The NCAA and common sense

Sometimes, it’s not an oxymoron.

The NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports recommended extensive changes to the NCAA’s drug-testing policies when it convened in mid-December in Indianapolis.

The committee’s recommendations, which will be further developed into a formal legislative proposal, were twofold: first, strengthen the NCAA drug-testing program for performance-enhancing substances; second, development of a shared model of deterrence for recreational drug use (e.g. marijuana, alcohol and opiates) with a focus on educational programs instead of a traditional testing model. Under this approach the responsibility for deterrence will be shared between the NCAA and member schools. Use of recreational drugs should absolutely be discouraged, the committee members said; but because they do not provide a competitive advantage, alternative approaches to testing should be developed.

I suspect this approach was spurred by the suspension of Oregon’s Darren Carrington before the national title game, but whatever works.

It raises an interesting question with regard to the home team, though.  What happens if the NCAA proposes something that is less stringent than Georgia’s recreational drug policy?  Remember, we’re the institution on a mission to bring the rest of the college football world up to the standards of the Georgia Way.  Would the school stand firm if the rest of D-1 adopted a uniform drug policy that was less harsh?

I’m not sure I want to hear the answer to that.

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29 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, The Body Is A Temple, The NCAA

29 responses to “The NCAA and common sense

  1. paul

    “If?” You KNOW the NCAA will come up with a policy less stringent than Georgia’s. You also KNOW that until marijuana is legalized in Georgia we will continue with the Georgia Way. Heck, we may even continue at that point as well. Why shouldn’t we hold our guys to a higher standard? It works for Nathan’s hot dogs. That was my attempt at sarcasm by the way.

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    • Cousin Eddie

      I believe Recreational Pot use is legal in Oregon, but federal law makes it illegal and that is what the NCAA follows. THe NCAA also has the positive level at a very low level much lower than the NFL, MLB and the Olympics testing body. I believe they should raise the level to the same as the Olympics, you know being amateur athletes and all.

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  2. They met in mid-December and the Oregon suspension was announced a few days before the game in early Jan, so I doubt very much this had anything to do with the Oregon thing.

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  3. Ben

    When Bobo took the job at CSU, I have to say I wondered how much it had to do with their pot laws. He’s said he’ll run his program different than Richt, and I imagine that also means not resting his guys the Monday after spring break. Or the Monday after a weekend.

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    • I suspect it had all of nothing to do with the laws there.

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      • Ben

        Well, yes, of course not. But what fun is the comment section here if we can’t say something off the wall every now and then?

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    • Rick

      Yea, that’s a stretch.

      Still, as much as I would hate to see Richt go, I would absolutely celebrate the nail in the coffin of our asinine marijuana policy.

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      • Mayor

        +1. The basic problem, giving Georgia credit for being high-minded and all (snark), is that the University doesn’t drug test the rest of the student body. When the school starts drug testing all those Hope recipients and Goldwater, Fulbright and Rhodes scholars the university is always bragging about on TV maybe then it will be alright to drug test athletes. While we’re at it, why not drug test the faculty? Right now the actions of the University of Georgia are hypocrisy of the rankest sort.

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    • PTC DAWG

      I’d say nothing, and it’s only legal for 21 and over.

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  4. Russ

    Don’t ask a question if you don’t want to hear the answer. And I suspect we all know the answer.

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  5. You can bet your ass that we’ll go above and beyond to work with the NCAA to combat that devil weed. UGA and the NCAA are on the same page with Nancy Reagan when it comes to the face of the war on drugs. They all still believe Reefer Madness is true.

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    • Dog in Fla

      That’s because this modern spiritual about a ventriloquist feeling the Joy and learning about the pain still applies

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  6. CMR said: I don’t want my guys to smoke weed.

    I think that’s the end of it right there. I don’t see him compromising on this one. If he is willing to live with the consequences I think I’ll live with them too.

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    • GaskillDawg

      I am sure Richt does not want his guys to smoke weed. The question is whether he thinks there are better ways to keep his guys from smoking weed than to suspend them from play.

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      • If he did think there was another way then he’d implement it. I think he’s also said that the most valuable thing for these guys is playing time. Taking it away is what gets their attention. He isn’t fighting this policy. He’s full square behind it.

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        • GaskillDawg

          His boss set the policy and he is supporting the boss. The “1st offense gets a game, 2nd offense 4 games” policy was not in effect until after Lewis Fish died and Mike Adams saw a chance to get righteous.

          Maybe Richt always wanted that policy and Richt leveraged the Fish death to change Adams not the other way around, but the fact that he has not criticized the policy set by his boss does not mean that he would do it differently if he could. .

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  7. Dog in Fla

    How they adjourned the NCAA weed meeting

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    • Well, while I get that it is recreational and having been a teenager in the 60’s I certainly understand a nihilist attitude – there are some negative aspects of continued use mental synapse and male hormone wise which are more than a little troubling.

      But, Bogart is close to the Classic City.

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  8. Macallanlover

    I think it would let UGA “off the hook” as a zero tolerance policy for infractions. I am all for keeping more serious drugs on the list of immediate suspension offenses but the “recreational” drugs like MJ and alcohol usage permeate the college environment and deserve at least a “warning” or educational experience, not suspension. I realize the line is arbitrary to some about which drugs constitute a major offense but cocaine, heroin, prescription abuse, and driving while impaired need to get stronger punishments, imo. A national standard seems to be fair and we should not feel the need to set a higher standard. If we do, drug tests and punishments should be the same as for all other students.

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  9. I’m not sure I want to hear the answer to that.

    Me neither.

    Frankly, the NCAA and UGA have no business punishing people for non-performance enhancing drugs. It isn’t their business. They aren’t the players’ mommy and daddy.

    Same goes for the NFL, by the way.

    This should be a civil rights issue, frankly. You shouldn’t be able to deny people’s ability to work/play based on personal choices they make that are not performance enhancing or negatively impact their ability to perform on the job.

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  10. AusDawg85

    Let’s see these enhanced player stipends start being paid, then punishments that are fines and not playing time. Now that’s a lesson for college kids to learn to prepare for the NFL.

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    • Macallanlover

      But…but….they is children Aus. We can’t expect them to get punished for wrong doing, they might have had a tough early childhood. get their union representative in there to appeal and drag this out, maybe file a suit. Because they is children, only 19- 22 years of age. Let them grow up before they learn about accountability.

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  11. South FL Dawg

    Ww can have a different standard but find another way to.punish them besides holding them out of games. Make them do something with their free time; that is a previous commodity too and it doesn’t have to hurt the team.

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