Butts-Mehre thanks you for your support.

Whether you’re someone like me who thinks the infrastructure upgrades for the fans’ benefit are long past due, or you’re someone who’s frustrated about an apparent lack of demand for accountability on the football program side, this is why we can’t have nice things.

Bill King calls us a “not-so-secret weapon”.  I’d say one man’s weapon is another’s source for complacency.

Face it, folks.  We get the athletic administration we deserve.

And, no, this isn’t a call to arms.  I’m not asking the peasants to storm the castle.  Just realize we aren’t exactly agents for change.  And hope that those who are agents for change occasionally share our agendas.

41 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

41 responses to “Butts-Mehre thanks you for your support.

  1. BCDawg97

    I’ve always laughed at the call to arms on the Vent. There will never be a mass exodus of ticket holders. And even if there was, there will always be 1000s of people like me willing to join in so I can have tickets for my 2 boys who live and breathe UGA football right now. Whether I’m disgruntled with the state of affairs doesn’t matter. Agreed Senator – the change has to come from the top 1-5% of donors.

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  2. I just can’t see what everyone is so fussy about. Looks great from where I sit.

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  3. Scorpio Jones, III

    My God….look at the people making money off telling us we love the damn Dawgs.

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  4. Athens Dog

    I’m in the top 10% and they could care less. As long as Adams/Morehead have control of the top 3%, nothing will change.

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  5. 3rdandGrantham

    Many (perhaps most) might disagree with me, but I have absolutely no problem whatsoever with our so-called apathetic nature as a collective fan base. Why? Well, because its been my opinion for quite a while that, given UGA’s stance among the top public universities in the U.S., we take in and churn out a wealth of really bright, well balanced, educated people.

    And in my vast experience, generally speaking, the more educated, successful, and well balanced you are, the less obsession you have with things that are totally out of your control and really don’t matter all that much; such as UGA football. Hence, you have the disposable income to continually support the program in myriad ways, but you aren’t exactly foaming at the mouth for UGA to win it all by any means necessary. Perhaps I’m in the minority, but I personally love and subscribe to such a healthy balance and perspective.

    Other SEC fans, with limited self-awareness and decreased cognitive ability, might snicker as such a foolish (in their eyes) positioning, but again I like where we’re at as a program, blemishes and all.

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    • Mayor

      Did you mean that you don’t GAS about winning and that people who do have “decreased cognitive ability?” ‘Cause that’s sure what that sounded like.

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    • Ginny

      Nice post, and I agree.

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    • Marktheshark

      I agree wholeheartedly with this. I’ve always said that the only reason I care about UGA football is that it entertains me. It’s a matter of perspective, and I’ve gained that through the years. I learned it when I first met my wife. We had just lost to West Virginia in the Sugar Bowl. I had a horrible night. I didn’t enjoy myself for the rest of the weekend despite being in the company of friends. Now, I have a 24 hour rule. I get over a loss within a day. I’ve found that my rule is measured more accurately in minutes, not hours. After it’s over, I don’t care.

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      • 3rdandGrantham

        Exactly; well said. To put is succinctly: like your sports…love your family, health, career, hobbies, and overall life. While going through a bit of a tough period in my life about 10 years ago, I noticed that all the well adjusted, successful, and happy people I knew of associated with didn’t give much of a rip about things outside of their control (such as UGA football). Instead, they focused only on the things they could control while giving cursory attention to things outside of it. Or, in in relation to sports, viewed them as an entertainment vehicle only.

        Conversely, those who ‘lived and died’ by their team, whether the Dawgs, Yankees, or Lakers, we’re generally less successful, in poorer health, and were in a perpetual state of drift in relation to their careers (especially) and their personal life. Eerily, this occurred right around the WVU loss for me too, and I made vast changes in my life starting around then. I’m 100% happier as a result, and I’m sure you feel the same way.

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        • I appreciate the sentiment and I don’t disagree with it. However, I love my DAWGS!! That means to me, like with family, you love and support them no matter what. If you only love your family when they do exactly as you want them to, well, that’s not love. I tell my people that if they were found with 37 kids under their floor I’d still support them. I might need them to go to jail, but I’d write letters, visit, send a few bucks. Same with my team. Love is unconditional. It isn’t bitchy and whiny and unreasonable and demanding. I will appreciate their success more if they do it the right way.

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        • Marktheshark

          I absolutely am happier. I’m a better husband, a better father, a better son, brother, friend, etc. with that perspective. UGA football is just one of many other aspects in life to which I apply that perspective (my car, personal belongings in general). UGA football happens to be a very important one. But it has its limits. I know what those limits are.

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        • I understand your point and I agree. I invest my emotions with each basketball and football game but I get over the losses quickly.

          The new college football playoff is going to create a whole new bunch of neurotic fans who view finishing 5th as just as big a failure as finishing 125th. Look at Bill Shanks. Eric Kasilias on NBC Sports radio preaches that “Being 4th is just as good as being 1st, and being 5th is no better than being 125th.” There are a lot of folks who buy into that shit.

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        • I noticed that all the well adjusted, successful, and happy people I knew of associated with didn’t give much of a rip about things outside of their control (such as UGA football). Instead, they focused only on the things they could control while giving cursory attention to things outside of it.
          Yikes
          I noticed years ago that 92 percent of the things people worry about are beyond their control.
          Conversely, those who ‘lived and died’ by their team, whether the Dawgs, Yankees, or Lakers, we’re generally less successful, in poorer health, and were in a perpetual state of drift in relation to their careers (especially) and their personal life. I’m sure your data is correct. Wow. I take it then that the Eeyore Dawgs,the Bobo Haz a Crayon Crowd over at Sports and Grits are in a perpetual state of dirft? I can get a chuckle outta that.
          But seriously dude…you’ve spent to much time in your men’s group, banging the drum, and waiting on that talking stick.
          😉 I worry about a whole bunch a stuff I can’t control and you do to. And I certainly am not less successful or in poorer health because of it! Good grief. Case in point. Compaction on our project came in at 94.7. That rounds up to 95 so its a pass. And that test was run after I was worried about it and thought we might need to pull out that fill and re compact it and have it checked. Lost a day. I agree people worry. I’m paid to worry. 😉

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    • Cojones

      That’s because you are a “fan” without the “atic”. Agree wholeheartedly on what you posted. Each game is unique and to be enjoyed without baggage.

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      • 3rdandGrantham

        Thanks Cojones. BTW, its sports so much more fun to watch with such a mindset? I watch more sports now than I ever did (in fact, its pretty much the only TV I watch), even though I care far less about the result itself as I did previously.

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    • Russ

      I agree. It took me a while to get there, but I’ve learned to enjoy the highs without letting the lows get me too down. And I am convinced that we will will win the big one in the near future. We’ve been too close before and I think the chips will finally fall our way.

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      • 3rdandGrantham

        A good Bama friend of mine was acting quite obnoxious after his beloved Tide beat LSU for the MNC a few years back, and he even threw a few barbs my way about UGA/CMR never getting to the big game. I finally had enough and said to him (paraphrasing): dude, after winning the MNC, you didn’t suddenly find yourself with 6 pack abs, a hotter wife, an extra 100k in your retirement account, and a better/happier career. Nothing has changed for the better for you, just as nothing for the worse happened to me as a result of UGA’s disappointing season. So who really cares.

        My point is, as much as I’d love for UGA to win it all sooner than later, I’m not going to sit around worrying or thinking about it all that much. If it happens, great. If not, no big deal, as either way it has no meaningful effect on my life at all.

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    • Bazooka Joe

      Grantham I agree completely with your post, however some of the items we are talking about here (filthy restrooms, totally overwhelmed concessions that do not have decent food items, etc…) are things that we SHOULD give a darn about and be vocal to the AA to fix. That is not an arms race with the rest of the conference, this is about the fact that it is embarrassing to have that shoddy of an operation at Sanford given the resources we have.

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      • 3rdandGrantham

        absolutely…no disagreement there, and poor concessions/restrooms is an entirely different subject altogether. I was merely discussing the often broached topic of UGA fan apathy when it comes to wins/losses, and overall success compared to the more rabid fan bases on the SEC who seemingly live/die by their team.

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  6. 81Dog

    the suits at UGA have made it pretty clear that they care about the money. They listen to the money, they do what keeps the money rolling in, they take action when they think the money is in jeopardy of being shut off to them. While this is probably true in any large organization, not all large organizations are as aggressive as UGA is about tugging at the heart strings of the rabble to keep their portion of the money coming in.

    Nowhere was this more obvious than the flap a few years ago involving Czar Mike’s use of UGA Foundation money, which he seemed to enjoy spending as if he was Marie Antoinette. The big money, for the most part, aligned itself with the Czar, so the vast majority of UGA alums and supporters got the back of management’s hand. The rich guys? They put Mikey in there, he smooched the right butts, he gave them access and/or control over stuff they wanted, they closed ranks and protected him.

    While the day to day donors, in the aggregate, are a significant chunk of money, all of us appear to be replaceable if only a handful decide to quit supporting the regime. This creates kind of a Prisoner’s Dilemma for a lot of folks who don’t approve, but also don’t want to lose their season tickets.

    Maybe some day, the top big money guys will care a little more about UGA and a little less about becoming the next Bobby Lowder, but the suits are probably always going to listen to the money. Sic semper money grubbing weasels.

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    • 3rdandGrantham

      The so-called big money guys certainly care about UGA, as they consistently make 6-7 figure donations. Thus, they deserve the right to have greater say and influence than Joe six pack, whose yearly contribution involves renewing his season tickets in section 134.

      Speaking of season tickets, for the life of me I can’t understand why so many of you continue to grudgingly renew your tickets yearly if you’re so unhappy with everything. The most common answer I get as to why (they renew) is because of all the previous years/built up points that they don’t want to forfeit. Talk about being total suckers for an obvious rat race type setup…like a puppet on strings.

      If you’re unhappy with how things are run, yet you continue to renew your season tickets anyway like a gullible rube, that’s a you problem; not theirs.

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      • 81Dog

        hey, if you’re ok with the big money guys letting Mike Adams treat the UGA Foundation like his personal ATM (show up salary for his wife, graduation party for his son, etc etc etc) in return for them getting to do what they want, good for you.

        Of course money buys influence. It doesn’t mean the people with influence all have the best interests of UGA at heart. I’m not saying every big money donor is the heart of evil, and plenty of them have done or helped to allow good things happen at UGA. But, some of them have enabled a lot of bad stuff to go on because the bad actors let them have their way.

        If you’re the kind of person who thinks “we just have to let the money guys run everything however they want, screw the average alum”, that sounds like a you problem. There are plenty of wealthy donors with a sense of noblesse oblige. Seems like we should be doing more to encourage them, rather than handing things over to guys like Don Leebern.

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      • Cojones

        Is it possible to agree with most of what both of you posted? While appreciative of 3rd’s remarks, my feelings that the money boys were behind most of the anti-Richt culture from the moment he hit our campus leaves me bollixed in a blind canyon.

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        • 3rdandGrantham

          Absolutely. I certainly didn’t try to convey that the big money guys were all in it for altruistic purposes only. No doubt you have your typical machinations taking place behind the scenes, with various figures constantly positioning themselves for personal gain first, UGA second.

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      • Who “deserves” to have influence is a value judgment, the same as whether you think blue is prettier than green. The other way to value who “deserves” is by head count; which group is larger and therefore a more renewable resource. Another way to value who “deserves” is the burden to the donor of the contribution. If Bill Gates dropped $5,000.00 into the Hartman Fund that $5,000.00 contribution is a whole lot easier to him than a $750.00 check to someone else. That guy making a $750.00 contribution is expressing more of a personal commitment than Gates.

        I am not advocating one over the other. I am pointing out there are competing points of view.

        Well, I am kind of advocating when I say this. I grew up in Atlanta starting in the late 1950s. I remember when Tech was the biggest game in town. Tech was the average fan’s team of choice in rural middle Georgia, according to some old timers I have asked. Tech had a wealthy alumni base that supported the team. Then, Tech left the SEC, the Braves and Falcons came along and Tech stopped giving a shit about the sidewalk alumni in Atlanta and rural fans. Meanwhile, Dan McGill began the Bulldog Club in every county in Georgia initiative to, in part, create good will in average folk around the state and to build a broad base of support. Dooley made following Georgia interesting. Tech would up having to offer 4 hot dogs and 4 cokes, trying to renew relationships with those ordinary folks it treated like shit 50 years ago.

        So, in my view, Tech is a good laboratory for the “wealthy donors are the only ones deserving attention” approach.

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  7. Dudemankind

    I remember the Ken Burn’s documentary on baseball where they talked about some owner back in the day who always wanted to come in 2nd or 3rd instead of winning it. He thought it a better business model.

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