Roquan Smith, learning experience

Okay, we know Georgia’s kept a slot in its 2015 class cleared for Roquan Smith.  What else do we know, or, perhaps more accurately, what else should we know?

First of all, it’s just another example of how the deck is stacked against these kids.  Smith is a teenager from a small town in middle Georgia.  Worldly he ain’t.  His chief advisor is his high school coach, a man no doubt more worldly than Smith, but hardly the kind of person you’d turn to if you were negotiating the most important contract of your life – at least if you were a regular joe who wasn’t prohibited by the NCAA from doing so.

And it’s not like Smith’s situation is an isolated case.  Five-star defensive end CeCe Jefferson hasn’t turned in his NLI to Florida yet over concerns about his defensive line coach bolting for the NFL after only one month on the job in Gainesville.  Long time Urban Meyer sidekick Stan Drayton announced his departure for the NFL yesterday, too.  Either you believe that the timing of these moves was remarkably coincidental – who wraps a deal with anyone in the NFL in a matter of hours? – or these programs sat on the news until the fax machines were turned off.

The system isn’t fair, because that’s the way the schools prefer it.  And the early signing period isn’t going to help most of these kids one bit.  What would help would be letting these kids have access to professional advice, but that’s another thing that isn’t going to happen without the threat of a judge saying so.

Second, some of us need to get our heads out of our asses.  A verbal commitment ain’t worth the paper it’s printed on, and yet plenty of us behave as if it is.  Kids change their minds; that’s part of what it means to be a kid.  (And let’s not forget that coaches do, too.)  After being misled about the biggest decision of his young life, Smith wanting to take a week to reach a final decision sounds like the smartest approach he could take right now.  Those of you jonesing for him to make a decision – any decision – need to take a step back and realize it’s not just your entertainment he’s weighing right now.

Third, it’s time to bury the romantic myth that these high schoolers choose the school, not the coach.

“It was everybody on the staff,” Macon County Athletic Director and football coach Larry Harold said Thursday. “Coach (John) Lilly was the first I heard from. We weren’t answering our phones, I wasn’t answering mine and he wasn’t answering his. All the sudden these text messages started coming in. They said, ‘RED ALERT: READ THIS.’ Somebody screen-shotted (the website) FootballScoop(.com) and it grew from there. It was crazy.”

Even Georgia’s coaching staff knows that’s bullshit.  Otherwise, why order the Code Red over Jeff Ulbrich’s next career move?

Honesty should compel the NCAA into loosening the transfer rules in the wake of coaching departures.  Of course, no one should hold his or her breath over that happening.  Honesty isn’t usually convenient for coaches.

The real lesson here is that the most leverage some of these kids ever have is the moment before they hit the send button on the fax machine.  If you’re someone whose services are in real demand, there’s no need to punch it until you’re as sure about your decision as you’ll ever be.

“(The recruiting period) isn’t over until the end of April, so there’s no rush. You know, it is a big decision and he needs to take his time, especially in lieu of what happened with the coach at UCLA leaving. So there’s a lot for him to consider. These things happen. But he needs to do what’s best for him and his family just like Coach Ulbrich did what’s best for him and his family. Everybody needs to do what’s best for their situation.”

Too bad it takes getting screwed to realize that kind of wisdom.

*************************************************************************

UPDATE:  As David Ching writes,

The day after signing day frequently features another unfortunate aspect of today’s first talking point: The day after players sign with colleges, the coaches who recruited them sometimes accept other jobs. That happened all over on Thursday, including Texas, where defensive line coach Chris Rumph left for the same post at Florida. He replaces Terrell Williams, who accepted a job with the Miami Dolphins, possibly making Jefferson’s situation even murkier since he would have been Jefferson’s position coach with the Gators. As we discussed in yesterday’s links, a coaching change was also a sticking point with Smith, as UCLA defensive coordinator Jeff Ulbrich, who recruited Smith, is reportedly leaving to take a job with the Atlanta Falcons. Unlike coaches who can basically leave at any time, players are bound to schools once they fax in their signed letters of intent. When adults deceive prospects like that, it’s a genuine shame. It’s one of the ugliest parts of the recruiting business.

But not the only one.

87 Comments

Filed under Recruiting

87 responses to “Roquan Smith, learning experience

  1. The NCAA ? You mean the organization run by College Presidents just the way they like it?

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  2. The kid needs to do what’s best for him and his family. Hopefully, he chooses Georgia, but he should take his time to make the best choice. You’re right, Senator, the most leverage he has through the process is right now.

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  3. Deutschland Domiciliary Dog

    It’ll never happen, but these high school kids ought to be permitted professional advisers (agents, attorneys, etc.) to narrow the information gap.

    And, what’s with “journalists” sitting on known college-coaches-jumping-to-the-NFL stories until after NSD?

    Real journalists do no such thing.

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    • Bulldog Joe

      In smaller markets, local journalists will sit on the story because they want to continue to have access to the programs they cover.

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    • Crazyoldladydawg

      All high school players in Alabama have their own personal agents! My son told me so, he coaches pee wee football in Southeast Bumfreak, AL and he knows everything about anything related to football at all levels in the phenomenal state of Alabama. I know for a fact this is 100% true! Don’t any of you dare question me!

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    • Yeah – they should have attorneys reviewing it but the NCAA doesn’t want that because the NLI and then the scholarship grant contract are so skewed to the advantage of the schools that they could never advise someone to sign one.

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  4. I had a HS buddy who signed with Tech in 1967 because be wanted to play for Bobby Dodd. As soon as the ink was dry on his LOI Dodd announced his retirement. My friend ended up playing 4 years for Bud Carson. This crap has been going on forever.

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  5. Thank you, Senator. As I said on the Mora thread, if Smith’s Dad was a 61 year old lawyer such as me, his Dad would advise him to get commitments from the coaches of his finalists that a scholarship will be available without him sending in a NLOI, then once he knows which schools commit to him, decide among them.

    Unfortunately not many 12th grade football players have lawyers with 36 years experience in their families. The NCAA and the coaches like it that way.

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  6. Millennium Dawg

    No disagreement on these kids getting some kind of representative or agent. If it could ever be allowed, I do not know, though, who would pay for this service. Would this leave the financially challenged kids unrepresented? Would agents only represent upper eschellon blue chippers at no cost now for guarantee of being their agent if they make NFL grade leaving the rest of the kids unrepresented. No griping here, just wondering how it would work.

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  7. watcher16

    Like you said in a comment to another post, Senator, players just need to learn that they are committing to a school, not to a coach. Those statistics showing the full coaching staff who actually sticks around for 4 consecutive years is staggering. They are naive if they think these guys will stick around just for them.

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    • DawgPhan

      Which is why a kid should be able to transfer at any time. Just like any other student or anyone that takes a job.

      You take a job and your favorite boss leaves and you dont like the new one, get a new job. move on. With these kids they are stuck with the new coach and the new coach gets to decide if they can leave and where they can go. That is bullshit.

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      • PatinDC

        I pretty much agree with this.
        What about the BS non-competes that current exist in Corporatlandia? (Jimmy John’s I am looking at you) seems a very similar circumstance.

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      • I don’t have a problem with a player being able to transfer at any time. The question is how the rules should change regarding eligibility to play. I think if the head coach leaves, every player should be able to transfer within an established window with no requirement to sit for a year. I don’t think the schools should be able to restrict where a player transfers to (looking at you, tech). Players should gain immediate eligibility to play after transfer when:
        1) The head coach leaves either voluntarily or involuntarily
        2) The player has graduated and wants to move to another program (exists now)
        3) The previous program has terminated his scholarship for reasons other than academics or behavior – “roster management”
        4) The previous program declares the player medically ineligible but he is able to gain clearance at another school – the “Jarvis” rule

        We could come up with some other examples as well.

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        • DawgPhan

          No reason to make a bunch of rules. A player can transfer at any time and remain eligible. No conditions.

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          • Sorry, we can agree to disagree on this. Then, I guess you’re OK with a coach telling a player we can cut you at any time. No conditions.

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            • DawgPhan

              They already can and do cut players at any time for any reason.

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              • DawgPhan

                Hell they kick players off the team and there are fans who post on this blog that would tell you that coaches should be able to kick a kid off the team and still control where he gets to play next.

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                • With the 4-year scholarship, that’s going to change. Those that “can and do cut players at any time for any reason” should be shamed by the media but instead are held up as the best coaches in the sport. See Saban, Nick.

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                • DawgPhan

                  No it isn’t.

                  https://blutarsky.wordpress.com/2015/01/18/its-autonomy-time/

                  [quote]The SEC’s athlete representatives took issue with a clause that would prevent schools from taking away scholarships, or in the case of sports with partial scholarships, reducing the amount of aid, from athletes for athletic underperformance.[/quote]

                  So back to your previous question.

                  Would I exchange freedom of movement for SAs for schools being about to do something they are already doing and have some of the athletes blessing on. Why yes, yes I would.

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                • DawgPhan

                  damn. I thought for sure that quote thing would work.

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                • Ok – that’s a very rational position in a perfect world. I actually wrote earlier that taking a player off scholarship for underperformance (roster management) would be one where the player should be able to transfer wherever he wants and be able to play immediately.

                  How would you like for Saban, Malzahn, or Corch to meet with players in Athens to recruit them away from Georgia as soon as the season is over? Corch calls up Sony Michel and says, “You’re going to sit behind Chubb for the next 2-3 years. Why don’t you come to Columbus and start for me instead?” Next, Saban calls up Jacob Park at the end of spring practice and says, “It looks like you aren’t going to be the starter in Athens this fall and that Eason kid is coming next year. Why don’t you come over to T-town and talk to Junior and me about becoming our QB?”

                  That takes recruiting to a completely different level and is where the transfer rules make the student-athlete consider the consequences of making a change.

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                • DawgPhan

                  It’s like you think that you can come up with a situation where my opinion is going to change. I dont care how difficult recruiting becomes for the coaches or the schools.

                  All I care about is that these students are being exploited and any options or leverage they might have has been systematically removed.

                  Now if you wanted to restrict teams from interfering with players on another team, like in the NFL, I would be all for that.

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                • You think the bad actors are going to abide by the rules against tampering with players being able to transfer freely? No way if they can get the kid to transfer. Along with the bagman will be the phone man who does the head coach’s tampering without being in violation of the letter of the rules.

                  If you think these guys are being exploited, then why support the system? Take your money and your time and use it elsewhere.

                  I think we probably agree more than disagree. If a player decides to transfer of his own volition, there should be a cost associated with that (he has to sit a year). If the coach decides to cut a player loose, then the coach deals with the cost of seeing that player on the opposite sideline in the next season.

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  8. truck

    It may be a “romantic myth” for a bunch of folks, maybe even the majority, but there are still kids out there who choose the school and not the coach. We’re lucky enough to have dozens in this state alone who’d be a Dawg no matter the coach, but only a few each year are elite enough to get the chance to do so.

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    • So was John Lilly wasting his time texting Smith and his coach?

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      • truck

        No, obviously not. Coach Lilly has a vested interest in getting the most talented players he can get into the fold. Our coaches’ livelihoods depend on top-notch HS talent. However, my “romantic” view of football, antiquated though it may be, still likes to see the kid whose desire and devotion to our school helps him succeed on the field. I’ve become somewhat jaded on the kids that consider college football a temporary layover where they’ll spend 3 or 4 years before going to the “next level.” Strength and speed does not always come out on top if motivation is lacking. Desire and devotion (ie, heart) provides that motivation, at least in my mind’s corny home movie version of football.

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  9. Scorpio Jones, III

    Code Red…Col. Blutarsky….did you order a Code Red? I need John Lilly on that wall.

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  10. Great as usual.

    I am glad we have a coach who would never knowing allow a coach to delay his departure until signing day.

    I agree kids should be able to transfer when a coach leaves. NCAA allows coaches to leave whenever they want to and the kids get the shaft as usual.

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    • Cojones

      If he leaves immediately after recruiting – yes. If he leaves later, after beginning the recruit’s training – no.

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      • So one day after the kid hits the weight room for supervised training, tough shit, eh?

        Seems fair.

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        • Cojones

          By that you mean that he was recruited by the S&C coach who suddenly has another opportunity? Well, yeah. Isn’t this the way it’s always done? 🙂

          At what point in the recruit’s campus life would you feel a staff member could take another opportunity?

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          • A staff member can take another opportunity any time he fucking wants to. A kid can’t. See the difference?

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            • Cojones

              Sure, but while that is inequitable, to me it’s comparing apples to oranges. A coach leaving for another opportunity doesn’t have to be equated to a kid not being able to go. Doesn’t mean that the kid doesn’t have my sympathy, just that the consequences to cfb is different. If all players can switch any time they please and in any year, pandemonium that ensues is not the answer to that inequity. How would you ever form a team?

              The same applies to paying the players. Without an agreement in place between all schools, it doesn’t take much imagination to see what’s in the bidding tea leaves. Both paying players and freedom of choice to play differing places each year aren’t going to benefit cfb in competitiveness on the field, in the player’s ability to showcase his talent (with the changing team landscape each year) and the cohesiveness of each team being destroyed by differing players at differing positions year to year and even midseason (if I understand your position correctly).

              I think both of those choices (paying players and go anywhere anytime) are counterproductive and would destroy cfb. Being an advocate for player’s rights is one thing; destroying cfb in the process is another. Pandora’s thingy permits unfathomable chaos. In my mind’s eye, that would happen when you don’t solve the problem before introducing your conscience’s cure.

              I guess that’s my two-fold question to you: How would you structure paying players and regulating that structure and how would you give players (at what time and under what circumstances) the ability to go anywhere anytime they choose without wrecking the sport?

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          • Marktheshark

            Anytime. Dinner… literally, anytime.

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    • My only problem with changing the transfer rules is where is the line … Is it if the head coach leaves, if their recruiter leaves, if their position coach leaves, if the S&C guy leaves?

      If the NCAA set up the rule where it’s the head coach, then fine. When James Franklin jumps to PSU, the players should have a window to look at their options (let’s say 2 weeks) to transfer without penalty. When the offensive coordinator leaves to take an NFL job or a head coaching gig, that shouldn’t give every scholarship player on the team the ability to decide to look at their options. For signees, they should have the opportunity to reconsider their option if their recruiter, position coach, or head coach leaves within a month of signing day.

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      • When the offensive coordinator leaves to take an NFL job or a head coaching gig, that shouldn’t give every scholarship player on the team the ability to decide to look at their options.

        A kid can leave a program under those circumstances. He just can’t go to another program and play immediately. Plus, if the old school won’t cooperate, he can’t be on scholarship for a year.

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        • True, but I think some commenters here are going where the player can leave at any time and be immediately eligible. I also think this whole thing about cooperation is a bunch of crap. If a kid wants to transfer, he should be able to be on scholarship at his new school regardless of what his previous school thinks.

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        • Cojones

          Sing should give all the players he recruited the opportunity to go elsewhere?

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          • Cojones

            The sentence began: “Are you saying that Bobo’s leaving should give….”. This computer is shorting every post beginning, but I forget to check quickly before posting.

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          • Cojones, I don’t speak for the Senator, but I think he’s saying that any guy can transfer now in that situation. He has to sit out a year, and the current rules state that the player can’t be on scholarship at that time unless his previous school gives him a release. I think in your scenario, the existing transfer rules should stay in place for eligibility to play except for the scholarship restriction. If a student-athlete decides to transfer, what business of it is his previous school’s if the next school is willing to put him on scholarship immediately?

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            • Cojones

              See my 12:40 post above. I’m aware as to where both our hearts are, but don’t understand how the problems created are to be solved when the gates go open. My stance is pragmatic in the sense that matters of fact and/or practical affairs trump idealistic stances that open greater problems. When I see the solution proposed that would adequately answer the problems and that won’t undo cfb then Bluto and I will probably be in the same place.

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              • The law of unintended consequences is a b!+<#. College sports at the highest level are changing. The question is whether people will support them as it transforms into NFL/NBA Lite. Your points are well stated as usual.

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      • Since I have a relative who was a part of the exact scenario you discussed (Franklin to PSU), I will offer my opinion (though not the opinion of my relative)

        My relative was Vandy recruit class of 2013. He was committed to a Pac 12 school (his home state) for 6 months but decided decommit from his original choice when the school had a disastrous season and it was apparent there would be coaching changes. He ended up with a lot of offers and tried on two occasions to commit to an SEC West school. He tried to commit on an official visit during the season but the coach told him they didn’t want him committing without a parent on campus. He went back to the same school in Jan with his Mom and this SEC West school told him that they would accept a commitment but it was non-binding on their part.

        Vanderbilt had offered him earlier in the Fall but he had never visited. So the following weekend in January, he went to Nashville. It ended up as the same weekend that a highly touted JC player who played the same position visited. My relative ended up getting a bout of the flu when traveling and spent Friday night & Saturday night of his visit in bed. He woke up on Sunday morning and found out the JC player had committed on Saturday. Fully expecting to not have an offer from Vandy anymore, Franklin said Vandy had made an offer and they would honor it. The only stipulation at that point was that he would have to agree to gray shirt and start in January 2014.

        The highly touted JC player ended up getting into a bit of legal trouble and was dismissed without ever playing a down. Vanderbilt tried to get my relative to come to Nashville in the summer using the JC player’s schools but the NCAA nixed it. The JC player’s scholarship was not allowed because the original player had participated in Spring practice.

        My relative stayed home for Fall 2013. He showed up in Nashville in January 2014 for Winter Semester. Franklin ended up leaving for PSU within a week. The new HC comes in from Stanford and brings in a transfer from his former school that plays the same position. He also signs a recruit – they both play the same position as my relative. So my relative redshirts for 2014. As we all now know, Vandy is terrible. They fire the 2014 OC and will go with a bit of a different offensive scheme in 2015.

        My relative decides that he wants to transfer to a school closer to home. He is a bit fed up with how it worked out and is homesick. He works out a transfer with a coach at a new school in home state and it is announced that he is leaving Vandy. The coach at this new school is pretty successful – so much so that the coach gets hired by a school in the SEC East. So my cousin has matriculated at two school but never played a down of college football. He has had four head coaches. He has been grayshirted, redshirted and transferred. Since he is a transfer, he cannot play in 2015 but the NCAA has granted him a sixth year of eligibility. If ever does hit the field, it will be 3 years + since he was in a live action game.

        The only silver lining in my mind for him is that he is a TE and his new head coach runs a pro-style offense that likes to throw it to the TE. I think we are familiar with his new HC’s and OC’s work. I hope he never hears anyone utter the phrase Fire Bobo.

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  11. Ant

    While the problems you mention are true the same thing happens in reverse. A kid is “committed” to a school and then on signing day sends his LOI somewhere else.
    More than anything the problems from the kids side come not from a lack of an agent but from the lack of a decent family. Almost all of the kids from a decent, stable, family come out fine.
    The real problem is that these kids look to much at simply the sports angle and not the education angle. If they would be more concerned with their post football lives most of this would not occur.

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    • More than anything the problems from the kids side come not from a lack of an agent but from the lack of a decent family. Almost all of the kids from a decent, stable, family come out fine.

      I’d love to see some statistical evidence to back up your assertion. As well as what “come out fine” means.

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      • I hate to see how any of these people have dealt with a job search where they were juggling multiple offers.

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      • To be fair Senator, you basically made this kid and his coach out to be country bumpkins when you were chiding fans for not being patient. I’m not saying you’re wrong and honestly if his coach is his only advisor than said coach is a moron.

        Sending a small town, likely dirt poor kid from rural GA to freaking Los Angeles? I’m sure his family is going to have an easy time seeing him play. Of course I wouldn’t be surprised if sleazeball Mora promised him that some boosters would pay to fly them out anytime he wanted.

        How a school that hasn’t been relevant in football in my memory actually has boosters is beyond me but I guess there’s a lot of $$ in LA. I just feel sorry for Smith the first time he takes a wrong turn and ends up in Compton or Watts. I want to know how the eff UCLA is even in the conversation for this kid and the one that did sign with them?

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  12. Cojones

    Let me help: “..kids from a decent, stable,(sic) family….’ means he committed where you wished he would commit; ……..but from lack of a decent family.” means he de-committed or never committed to you in the first place – and you wanted him really bad.

    “…come out fine.” means the family with good obstetrician with good delivery results. Those that don’t “come out fine” are poor and therefore warped toward society from birth. We are interested in them only if they play good football which corrects their initial warpage.

    OK?

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  13. Ant

    While I am not sure where one would get such statistical evidence, if you just think back to the issues UGA has had this has been the case. Do you remeber Da’Rick?

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    • You cite one kid in support of the broad brush you paint with? Nice.

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      • Ant

        I figured you could remember the others as well as I can.

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        • I can think of plenty more who weren’t recruiting problems.

          Basically, your theory – which is all it really is – doesn’t hold much water.

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          • Ant

            I did not say that most that did not come from a decent family were problems. I said that most of the ones that were problems came from a poor family situation. There is a difference.

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            • DawgPhan

              You should probably drop the whole “poor family situation” because you probably don’t actually know that much about their situation. The language is all very loaded.

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              • Ant

                For the most part I only know what is written about them or the quotes that they give. Some I know a little more detail than others obviously. It is really just following the natural order of things. Most that are in prison did not come from a decent family situation either.

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            • I understand the line you’re trying to draw here, but, again, it’s merely an assertion on your part. I can think of plenty of problem signees who have come out of family situations you would approve.

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  14. Irwin R. Fletcher

    But an Early Signing period will fix all this!!!**

    **by fix, I mean, it will make it much easier for coaches to leave for other jobs and not affect recruiting.

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  15. buddy

    That’s life. Does a young man join the Army planning on having a certain First Sgt. or Commanding Officer?? NO way.
    The major problem with the college football thing is that these recruits have very little intellect for anything but the football part. They could hardly care less about the college part. But that is supposed to be the main thing. All they see is the NFL part of College Football.
    Return college football to students or it will die. It is living for the big donors and the NFL more every year- and to finance the 20-30 sports required by Uncle and Aunt Federal Government in Title IX (I believe they call it.)
    To do this, let the NFL recruit straight out of high school.
    The road college football is headed down is the big money way until all of a sudden they wake up and find out they are as detached from a state’s or college’s people and as professionalized as the Atlanta Falcons.

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    • Buddy, you’re correct. I’ve always said the solution to the problem is on Park Ave. with Roger Goodell and his 32 bosses. The NFL has its bargaining agreement with the NFLPA that says that players aren’t eligible for its player draft until they are 3 years removed from high school. The League has taken advantage of the fact that the college system provides them NFL-ready athletes for no cost. If the League thought players could be NFL-ready right out of high school or they could make money on “minor league” football, the college system wouldn’t be what it is today. There’s a reason college football stadiums seats 100K+ and college baseball fields seat 10K at most. The best baseball players go from high school to the minors as opposed to football & men’s basketball where they have to make a stop at college.

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  16. Mark

    The kids should be completely free to transfer when their HC, OC, or position coach leaves. They also should be free to get representation before signing the contract otherwise known as LOI. We have a monopoly going on here and I am surprised that more people don’t value freedom over entertainment. I guess I shouldn’t be, but I am.

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    • Mark, they are free to transfer but have to sit out a year from competition in exchange. The question is when they should be eligible to play after transfer (I say after the HC leaves, they should be able to leave and be eligible immediately). I also believe the school shouldn’t have the right to tell them where they can transfer and be on scholarship immediately – that’s the restraint of trade right there. I also think there’s something to obtaining representation prior to signing the LOI.

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      • Mark

        I wouldn’t call it “free” if they have to sit out a year. And if the school doesn’t release them, they have to sit out two years. I do agree agree your sentiment. The schools shouldn’t be able to tell them where they can or cannot transfer to, but they can only do that because of the “release” cause. Good post.

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        • I didn’t say without cost. They aren’t restricted from transferring, and the release is a joke.

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          • Mark

            I don’t think restricted means what you think it means. 1 to 2 years cost of eligibility is a restriction.

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            • It’s a restriction just like the $80,000 price tag on a high-end, luxury car is a restriction. I would like to go purchase that car, but I have to weigh whether the benefit outweighs the cost. When the player signs the LOI, he/she agrees to the rules (and costs/restrictions) regarding transferring. They are free to transfer at any time during their eligibility but have to weigh the cost of the 1 to 2 years of potentially lost eligibility in that decision. It’s the law of economics at work.

              A restriction is that if I decide to transfer, the school I’m transferring from has to release me to be eligible to be immediately on scholarship. I think that’s wrong and should be changed. I’m proud that part of the Georgia Way is that CMR doesn’t put restrictions on those who decide to transfer even if it’s to an annual rival.

              I take it, Mark, that you are one of the individuals on the side of unrestricted transfer for any reason. I posted this question earlier: Are you OK with the bad actors using 3rd parties to tamper with student-athletes on other campuses like the “bagmen” do in the high school recruiting process because that’s what you get if there’s no cost/restriction?

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  17. 69Dawg

    For a country that is suppose to believe in a “Free Market” no one really wants one in their part of the economy. The NCAA’s sole purpose as I see it is to regulate an industry so that the labor is cheap. Now we all know this is not legal but it will take many more years before the courts correct this. The schools and therefore the NCAA are basically fighting a delaying action. They know that barring an Anti-trust exemption they are doomed. The larger schools in the spirit of the “lets see if we can just make it go away” gambit are beginning to give the labor more money. Does anyone in their right mind think that if this thing was being done by a publicly held corporation to their labor force the DOL would not have destroyed them.

    The kids should have counsel and as an attorney I would pro bono it for a poor kid. This system sucks and needs to be changed by the damn schools not the Federal government.

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  18. PTC DAWG

    Boo Hoo…I think I’ll go wheep about the kid who works his way through College and pays for everything out of his pocket.

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  19. fred russo

    This kid does not want to play for UGA WHY!

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  20. Will Trane

    CMR and staff may have some faults. And maybe UGA pedigree is biased to the Dawghouse. But the men on that staff are straight forward and mature. CMR’s history on managing his staff is solid. He wants his coaches in place by signing day. He wants the high school prospects to see and to hear who will coach them at the next level. I give the man credit for that.
    And if I was a player I would take that to the bank. UGA has sent some players to the NFL under CMR. It is a long way from Macon County, or anywhere in Georgia to Westwood.
    Playing in the SEC is “it”. 2014 was a down year for the SEC. It will not happen again for awhile.

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  21. W Cobb Dawg

    As one who worked 8 years during the day while attending night school to get B.S. and M.S. degrees, I think each and every kid who gets a scholly – regardless of the school or coach, is getting a damn good deal. Coaches leave, and/or they may be dishonest, and/or they may not give a shit about a kid unless he can play football. Assholes are part of life. If things don’t work out as a kid planned or was promised, he just received a very valuable lesson about making decisions.

    I’m all for having legal representation – its a right provided under the constitution. But I don’t believe it changes the big picture. Some kids are very happy with their decisions, and others not so happy. But they’re all getting a damn good deal.

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    • DawgPhan

      Alright then. Please let me handle all of your future compensation negotiations. I am sure you will be fairly compensated, at least in my opinion.

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      • W Cobb Dawg

        First, I don’t get what point you’re trying to make. I have no objection to players having the best advice they can get, whether its a professional or a parent.

        In regard to your offer, if the starting point is a free ride for college, instead of me working construction out in the elements for 8 years & paying all the bills, then you’d be more than welcome to represent me. But in the end I still have final say, and have to sign my name on the dotted line no matter what you work out with a college. Even the best laid plans can’t avoid that reality.

        Finally, I’m not foolish enough to believe that any rep, whether its an attorney, agent, or parent will provide much more of a satisfaction guarantee than a college coach. Some coaches are scumbags, as we can easily see from these job announcements the day after signing day. Then again, some attorneys, agents and even parents are scumbags too. Like I said above, sooner or later the kid has to sign his name and accept responsibility for the decision.

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  22. Freedawg

    Simple way to curb the “cutting” of players…immediate eligibility at another school (of their choosing). Some coaches remain disingenious regarding their intentions for some players, just to keep them from rival schools. Just look at the number of players from the state of GA that have bought that story at other schools and we haven’t heard boo from them. Not sure where I stand on the coaching departure, but it is certainly uneithcal to leave the day after you sign a new class or recruits.

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  23. Cousin Eddie

    As long as schools offer 1 year Scholarships (1 year contract) the SA should be able to transfer at the end of his contract anywhere he wants.
    Once the schools go to 4 year deals then some, for lack of a better term, pay back like the coaches are usually required to do would be ok. Maybe limit who they can play for or have the second school reimburse the first school for the remaining $ amount on the scholarship. This is what often needed for coaches to transfer. Maybe each player could write in stipulations on their contract, if I sign with South Alabama and am good enough to be re-offered to go to Bama I can leave with no penalty, the way coaches have outs on their contracts. Treat these 18 yr. old like adults with options and consequences?

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    • Cojones

      Agree with you on stipulations in a contract, but isn’t the LOI considered a contract for acceptance of scholarship? So contracts already exist, correct? Doesn’t seem like stipulations added would upset any legalities. What about it 69?

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      • If you are asking if it is an enforceable contract, what is the consideration? The university gives up nothing. The student receives no benefit.
        However, question of whether it is an enforceable contract is irrelevant to the NCAA. What is relevant to the NCAA is that it is a voluntary association and that someone wishing to voluntarily participate in its activities has to abide by certain rules.

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  24. Roquan ain’t coming to UGA, book it!

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