KISS in the Schottenheimer era

One comment that’s emerging pretty consistently from Georgia’s new offensive coaches is the “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” mantra.  Here’s Rob Sale on that:

Sale admits that his job is to basically not mess up what took place this past season, when Chubb rushed for 1,547 yards and 7.1 yards per carry.

“The philosophy is play-action and that everything we do has to tie in,” Sale said. “We have to believe in the same principles of covering up the down linemen, knocking them off the ball and let great running backs be great running backs. It’s a pretty simple concept.”

It also has the benefit of having worked well over the past few seasons.

I know this started with Richt and his shopping list of what he wanted from Bobo’s successor.  But it’s good that everyone appears to be on the same page with the boss’ wants.  It’s one thing to keep it simple.  It’s another to get an almost entirely new offensive staff rowing in the same direction from the start.  The task of finding a new quarterback to run the show is a big enough chore.  There’s no need to complicate that with a big change in scheme.

18 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

18 responses to “KISS in the Schottenheimer era

  1. Juan

    Imagine last years offense with a dynamic QB. Sure hope Park is that guy.

    Like

  2. Rebar

    It is going to be an interesting year. I’m looking forward to finding out who the new center will be working with the new quarterback.

    Like

    • Cojones

      That center is the central part of the duo that hasn’t been discussed much. Are we coaching up good candidates to the point that they all can recognize and point out the D scheme for others? Are we putting him together with differing QBs so that he can be a steadying force for each QB?

      KISS works well with moxie and that’s the tandem that we need. Hope all QBs are so good as to push the next one.

      Like

      • Macallanlover

        I am sure we will get the center (and QB) worked out successfully but I had heard that Houston was one of the options for center….I hope not. Nothing against him but I don’t want a one year solution at such a critical position. May be nothing to the speculation about Houston being tried there, perhaps just a backup role in case of injury.

        I know we are hearing a lot questions about the new offensive staff, and that makes sense given the complete shake-up in the last 75 days, but you have to feel good about the returning nucleus they have to build from and the comfort the head man won’t let things wander too far from the successful model we have enjoyed.

        Like

  3. 81Dog

    I guess this means the geniuses 40 rows up will still be able to call EVERY OFFENSIVE PLAY WE’RE ABOUT TO RUN BEFORE WE RUN IT, just like the last 7 or 8 years.

    One of these guys should apply for the defensive coodinator’s job at Auburn, because those guys have hardly guessed right once in the last 10 years.

    Like

    • Cojones

      They get their training here at gtp and then we just turn’em loose in the stands. ‘Course the arrogance flavor differs as to their play-calling correctness.

      Like

      • Just Chuck (The Other One)

        The guy 40 rows up, at least the one next to me, counts himself as correct if he just gets it right calling pass or run. Don’t ask him who gets the ball or where the play is designed to go, he’s too busy complaining about the obvious play calling.

        Like

  4. W Cobb Dawg

    Works great as long as we can keep handing the ball to RBs who average 7.1 yards a carry.

    Like

  5. What about KISS in the Bobo era? Conley had to go to the Combine to show off his speed? No one knew in Athens how fast the kid was? I thought we had no “deep threat” last year?

    “That’s a lot of questions, right?”

    Like

    • AusDawg85

      IMHO Conley was really our only deep threat and got jammed or had safety coverage on him a lot because of that. Murray usually had more deep threats on the field at once and could make the back shoulder throw Mason couldn’t. This more than anything contributed to the “weak arm” knock on Mason when he really just didn’t want to waste a throw deep when his check downs were open. As much as many want to see Ramsey or Park go deep this season, if that comes at the expense of more turnovers, sacks, and 3 & outs while we’re still able to rip 7 YPC, then give me another rag-armed sloth under center.

      Like

      • I asked this question last year (to myself), “why can’t Mason throw the back shoulder? He’s been practicing it for four years!” I have no idea how many reps the 2 gets in practice, and maybe thats it. He never got his timing with the receivers until his senior year.

        Like

        • Will (The Other One)

          And, his arm wasn’t as good as Murray’s. He had a nice deep ball, but he couldn’t rifle one over the middle (like that shortish pass Conley took from Murray for that long TD vs. Nebraska).

          Like

        • Murray threw the back shoulder deep out and the tight end seam route like an NFL QB from 2011 on. If he were 3 inches taller, he would have been a top 10 pick.

          Like

  6. 69Dawg

    Nothing takes the fight out of a team than a good old fashion Road Grading offensive line. Look how we reacted last year when UF just ran the ball all day and gashed us. Look how other Ds have rolled over for our O in the 4th quarter. I love smash mouth football as long as we are doing the smashing.

    Like

    • Macallanlover

      You are right on both counts. Man it is demoralizing to watch someone run the clock while you are helpless to stop their ground game. Prefer getting KOed quickly by big punches than pounded by relentless jabs for the half of the 4th Qtr.

      Like