“Their summertime is my summertime.”

Colorado men’s basketball coach, Tad Boyle, putting the “voluntary” into summer workouts:

“As coaches, we know where we need to get better, but how are we going to do it?” Boyle said. “There’s some things in the offseason that probably need to change and are going to change. The bar is going to be raised; the commitment is going to be higher.”

The main change will come in how the players spend their summer. In the past, Boyle has let his players choose between going home and staying in Boulder, figuring they’d work just as hard on their game either way.

“As a coach, I trust these players and maybe I’ve trusted them too much,” he said. “Now, that leash is going to be tightened.”

For those players who want to remain on the team, their summer is going to be spent in Boulder.
[Emphasis added.]

Remember, playing college sports is a privilege.  If these student-athletes can’t fully appreciate the opportunity Boyle is providing for them by giving up more and more of their free time, they can just go play professional ball somewhere else, right?

Ah, the joys of amateurism.

(h/t)

30 Comments

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30 responses to ““Their summertime is my summertime.”

  1. 3rdandGrantham

    Agree with coach Boyle regarding their summertime being his summertime. Although there is that really small matter regarding compensation, in which Boyle is paid 1.5 mil yearly while his players get paid, well, next to nothing. Other than that, I have no issue with his comments whatsoever.

    I estimate that coach will make approx. 400k this summer alone. Given his newfound ‘we’re all in this together’ mentality, I assume that he’ll soon petition the NCAA to allow him to distribute that 400k among the team.

    After all, his summertime is their summertime too, and this indeed is all about the student athletes.

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    • reipar

      I do not think the term next to nothing means what you think it means. Approximately 40K a year would seem pretty good to a lot of people.

      Now if you mean in comparison to 1.5 mil a year that is a different story.

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      • Or perhaps he means in the context of the money flowing into power conference revenue sports.

        And that’s right.

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        • reipar

          Then I guess the girls tennis players at Colorado are way over paid?

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            • reipar

              All they do is lose money, but they get the same 40K a year. Seems like we need to devise a system that properly compensates and rewards those making the money and does the same to those costing the money. The revenue people need a cut and the nonrevenue people need to take a cut.

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              • In essence, isn’t that what happens when a school decides to eliminate a sports program, as was the case at UAB?

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              • DawgPhan

                I never get this attitude. Why does someone need to be punished to right a wrong against someone else? You can do the right thing by girls tennis and mens football.

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              • GaskillDawg

                The NCAA and universities will love the loss of 501(c)(3) non-profit status and will love paying taxes on the athletic profits when the justification of the tax exempt status of the revenue is eliminated.

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      • DawgPhan

        $40k a year is not a lot for people who are really good at something.

        For people without skills that people value and are difficult to acquire, $40k/year is a lot.

        College football players are more former than latter.

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        • DawgPhan

          For example an intern at google or twitter would probably make $70-100k/year. An intern.

          I am sure someone at some point tried to sell those same kids that experience was it;s own reward. Lucky for them they are smarter than those folks.

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          • 3rdandGrantham

            Though interns at Google don’t make that, otherwise you’re dead on. I know guys in their mid 20’s making at least 125k, who chose to be mobile (i.e. move to where the hot jobs/sectors are), and chose to pursue a career in high growth verticals.

            Besides, in many U.S. markets, its almost impossible to survive on 40k a year. Heck, even 80k is really, really tough, in which 50% or more of your pay would go directly towards housing.

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  2. gastr1

    In fairness, what else is he going to do? They have been awful this year. They play like this next year and he’s probably out of a job.

    Of course, he might get the same result by keeping them in Boulder. Showing up late & high for workouts, anyone?

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  3. The other Doug

    Boulder is lovely in the summer. We have an incredible Shakespeare festival and Classical Music is also top notch. They are adding chamber music this summer! Add in Wide Spread Panic at Red Rocks, rafting Boulder Creek, and all the local organic food a growing boy could want, and I think the players should pay CU for the privilege of staying the summer.

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  4. Hank

    Wasn’t our football defense told something similar last year? Stay, or go home and lose 20 lbs if you want to play. I don’t remember anything about being kicked off the team.

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  5. …but what if they have to work to earn spending money for the year?

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  6. PTC DAWG

    Either the NCAA has rules about mandated practice time, or not.

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    • Welcome to their world where it’s Summertime for Tad Boyle in Boulder;
      Winter for his players, tough break…

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      • PTC DAWG

        Well, my Son wouldn’t have had much of an issue in sticking around school in the summer, if they were paying his way…I know that for sure. Lift weights, shoot hoops, away from Mom and Dad…..good times.

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    • Cojones

      PTC, I certainly thought it was against the rules to mandate summer practice and for coaches to take part at all. Wha’ hoppened?

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  7. W Cobb Dawg

    I’m assuming they must also attend classes to justify using campus facilities, and receiving room, food, etc.

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