“I learned what I feared the most would happen.”

I keep saying it’s inevitable that a college football playoff will have an impact on how the college football season is perceived.  If you won’t take my word for it, take Nick Saban’s.

“All the attention, all the interest would be about the four teams in the playoffs, which is exactly what happened, which was great to be a part of.

“But what I was most fearful of is college football is unique. A lot of young men get a lot of positive self gratification from being able to go to a bowl game and that’s always been a special thing. That by having a playoff we would minimize the interest in other bowl games, which I think is sort of what happened and I hate to see that for college football.”

Or Jimbo Fisher’s.

“I’m worried winning the Orange Bowl doesn’t mean anything. When I was a kid … we still had a national champion but [the other bowls] still mattered. Now if you go 12-2 and win an Orange Bowl or Sugar Bowl or Cotton Bowl or Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl and you say that’s not enough? There’s something wrong with that now,” Fisher said. “When you’re 12-2 there’s not much better you can do. You might get over the hump [to the playoffs] but how many times?”

And think about how this mindset is manifesting itself in ways like the Big 12’s agonized struggle to crown a conference champ.

Which is why this Saban observation should give you pause for thought.

“The issue for me in all of this stuff is the culture of college football is changed,” he said before the Regions Tradition pro-am at Shoal Creek. “It’s no longer just about the SEC getting in the BCS bowl game. This is about a playoff. This is about a final four.”

In that spirit, he said all the major conferences should play with the same rules.

“So I think we need to be a little more global in our thinking in terms of making the rules in the Big 5 conferences kind of congruent with each other,” Saban said. “So if one group is going to be able to do it, the other group needs to be able to do it.”

That, folks, is a sweeping comment.  And it’s the logical destination to the course that college football has set for itself in its chase for more money.  Look at the CFP as the Transportation Department, coming in to widen the road, so the schools can get where they’re headed more quickly.

It’s how you convert a sport based strongly on regional appeal – SEC!SEC!SEC! – to a national focus.  ESPN will love it.  Me?  Not so much.

But, again, don’t take my word for it.

75 Comments

Filed under BCS/Playoffs, College Football

75 responses to ““I learned what I feared the most would happen.”

  1. Senator, I’m afraid we’re all old farts who want our college football regular season and the bowl games to mean something. I’m totally with you on the playoff and its eventual evolution to a December/January Madness.

    By the way, I never really thought an intelligent comment could come out of Jimbo Fisher’s mouth. He really hits the nail on the head, and I’m afraid he’s talking about the mentality of the “NC or bust” crowd.

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    • MGW

      Every fan now thinks their team should be a total dynasty or they suck. Its ridiculous.

      The irony of the money chase is it effectively does nothing to improve these programs or the schools. They all just need more money to spend more money to keep up with the other schools that are spending more money so the recruits will come here instead of there. A few schools like Oregon have risen to prominence competitively directly because of dumping money into the program, but largely it is all simply to maintain the competitive status quo. And it gives absolutely no benefit to the alumni and fans. The only straight faced argument that this is a good thing is that now there won’t be (as many) years where schools dispute who was the national champion. Which even more ironically makes every single school less likely to be able to claim a championship and make their fans and alumni happy. And even better – there’s still dispute about teams unjustifiably left out! AND THER ALWAYS WILL BE NOT MATTER HOW BIG THE PLAYOFF GETS!

      If there was some massive infusion of cash into the educational side of the schools that would be one thing, but overall there is not. Professors are still underpaid and students still have to pay too much for their education – almost everywhere. Its just a stupid little arms race to see who can have the shiniest locker room and the biggest jumbotron inside the biggest stadium so coaches and AD’s and Presidents don’t get fired.

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  2. Russ

    College football. I’m sad to see it go.

    Saban and Fisher are correct. We’re changing the culture of college football and making it another national entity. Soon, I’ll care as much about college football as I do college basketball, which is two weeks out of the year.

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  3. Beakerdawg

    As soon as the suits in Bristol figured out how they could exploit college football and turn it into a southeast Asian sweatshop, make boatloads of cash and then splash it around to the warlords (ie – conference commissioners), cfb was over.
    It’s all fake juice. Imo, it’s like watching a Hollywood movie where the actors think they are talking southern when in reality, to the natives, it is cringe-worthy.

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  4. Go Dawgs!

    I’m not sure I agree with the idea that winning the Orange Bowl doesn’t matter anymore. I guess it may begin to mean less and less as we move into the future, but I also think that started with the advent of the BCS era, frankly. Look no further than our own fan base where people grumbled about Mark Richt winning a pair of SEC titles, playing for three others and winning a pair of Sugar Bowls but never winning the “big” crown. A bowl win is big for a program on the rise and then once you perceive your school to be among the top tier of programs, winning even a major bowl game didn’t mean quite as much.

    I think the playoff system may take away some of the luster of winning one of the semifinal bowls (I don’t know that Oregon is really pumping up the fact that they won the Rose Bowl and I’m not sure Ohio State is bragging about the Sugar Bowl trophy). The NCAA basketball tournament is brought up a lot around these parts when we discuss football’s postseason, and I think if you ask any Georgia basketball fan about the 2014-15 season they’ll tell you that making the tournament was a big deal even though UGA basketball didn’t even manage to win what is probably the equivalent of a minor bowl game in Charlotte. There are a lot of teams that make the big dance with no shot at winning the thing but just getting there is seen as an accomplishment. If Georgia, absent from the tourney for years, loses its first rounder it was a good season. If Duke loses its first rounder, though, the season was a waste. And if Georgia goes to the tournament five years in a row and loses the first rounder all five times, suddenly the coach is in trouble. Making a minor bowl game isn’t the same accomplishment as earning an NCAAT berth, but making the Sugar Bowl is. At least, if you didn’t start the season with bigger dreams, that is.

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    • Go Dawgs!, all you have to do to see the “NC or bust” mentality is listen to people talk about the 2007-8 season now. It’s not about beating the Big 3 for the first time since ’82. It’s not about Evil Richt and the Celebration. It’s not about the Blackout and what that afternoon still means to the Bulldog Nation. It’s not about going to Atlanta and smacking the Yellow Jackets. It’s not about going to New Orleans to crush Hawaii. It’s about the team stubbing its toe against USCe and the loss to Tennessee and how Mark Richt cost us a national championship.

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      • UGA85

        The team you refer to did not win the SEC East, let alone the SEC. It was a fun and colorful year, I agree, but I still think it is fair to expect championships at UGA.

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        • I didn’t say we shouldn’t but people complain when we win the East but not the SEC. My point is that 2007 team finished #2 in the polls – the best finish of the Richt era, but people still bitched about that season.

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          • UGA85

            It was definitely the most fun year under Richt for me. I was in Jax for the celebration and in Athens for the blackout and had a great time both games. I feel kind of haunted by that team, as I look back, and I still can’t believe they lost those two early games. Two loss seasons can be fun, I agree, but they will not meet (with rare exceptions) the standard of excellence required of championship teams.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Chadwick

      Wait til the CFP expands to eight. Just watch. Fisher!, and Saban are correct. Welcome to the College Football League.

      Like

  5. 904Biscuit

    I don’t really understand all the “gloom and doom” most here would say is coming to college football. I don’t remember thinking or feeling, at any part of last year, that I’m not as excited as I have always been for the Dawgs to take the field on any given Saturday. And the Belk bowl? I wasn’t as happy to be in that bowl as I would have been if we were in the CFP. But that’s pretty much how I felt during the whole BCS era.

    I know that a huge playoff would lessen the importance of every regular season game. But, for me, I’m already hooked. And I don’t see my feelings, of getting excited and wanting to beat the crap out of everyone we play, changing because there is a playoff.

    I think what makes the bowl that isn’t part of the playoff, is the opponent. As long as the selection committees in the lesser bowls pick good match-ups then the games should be fun for everyone involved.

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  6. PTC DAWG

    Tell me how winning the SEC is diminished? I do not see it.

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    • It’s a process, grasshopper. Still a long ways to go.

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    • Gravidy

      It isn’t diminished in your eyes, nor is it diminish in mine. But I do believe it is diminished in the eyes of some, and I believe that trend will continue as the playoff expands.

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      • Dog in Fla

        I believe that Nick still has post-partum depression anxiety from giving rebirth to Irwin in the semi-final Sugar Bowl

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      • PTC DAWG

        IF the Champion is guaranteed a spot in the playoff..which I believe all major 5 will at some point, I still don’t see how that diminishes anything re a conference championship. Might even be worth an opening HOME playoff game, or a bye.

        The basketball model doesn’t work here…so I don’t see why some are fretting about it.

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        • Gravidy

          Your first paragraph illustrates the problem pretty well, at least as I see it.

          First, you assume that winning the SEC will guarantee a spot in the playoff, which seems to make everything OK in your eyes. For me, winning the SEC isn’t a means to an end. I do not view it as a pathway to the playoff. It is an end in and of itself. In my opinion, it is the goal of every season.

          And secondly, you assume the playoff will expand. I also believe it will expand, but I don’t think that’s a good thing.

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          • PTC DAWG

            I still don’t see how winning the SEC is not the goal, EVERY year. I guess we’ll just agree to disagree.

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          • Cojones

            Your post is simple and well-put. I feel your concern and slightly guilty for how I see it differently. We have shifted the old reality of selecting the NC by popularity contest at the end of the season to selecting the representatives for a NC with some of the same faults inherent in perception and judgment of teams. While I crave an 8-team playoff, the only answer to everyone’s problem is selecting after Bowl games without a playoff.

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  7. Argondawg

    It speaks volumes when two coaches who made the 4 team playoff say that but tagain these guys have the bar set so high for them that not winning it all is somehow a failure. It reminds me of NASCAR to some extent. They wanted it to appeal to everyone and by moving it to more of a national sport they essentially killed the brand. Friends that used to love it could care less about it now. We are old farts now. We have seen the death of boxing. Baseball is slowly dying to the next generation. College basketball is a shell of its former self. Football will be in decline as the head trauma issues continue to grow. This shit is depressing!

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    • Joe Schmoe

      Prediction: Baseball will see a big resurgence as a) the college football brand is eroded by greedy SOBs and b) fewer and fewer children are allowed to play it due to safety concerns.

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      • Dog in Fla

        All the breaking balls I have taken to my head have had no no no no effect on me

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        • Cojones

          Speaking of breaking balls, I get a lot of communications from environmentalists who want to break your Govs balls. Understand he’s even taken money from the billions set aside to begin recovery of the Everglades from all the sugar beet industry pollution from years ago. And that the Fl Legislature is helping him. Niiice.

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          • Dog in Fla

            Everyone wants to break his balls including most of the wingnuts in the Florida legislature, which just goes to show that there is no honor among thieves

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  8. And the inevitable “playoff creep” is just one piece of the ever-blander made-for-TV puzzle. Other pieces include longer games with less sustained action, cupcake-ophoria, expanding conferences to include teams that while perfectly nice don’t mean shit to us as rivals and whose campuses are half a continent away, and killing off the great old rivalry games. And we have to pay more for all this?

    Well, it’s happening, and that’s that. Cable TV is mightier than the hard core fan. But the other side of the coin is that, having professionalized the sport, the players should, logically and ethically, be unshackled. Full freedom to go pro, $ for autographs, unionize, etc. Otherwise, it’s the rankest exploitation.

    Or is this all what you’ve essentially been saying for the past however many years, Senator?

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  9. 3rdandGrantham

    I agree with 904 above in that I don’t see (or get) all the doom and gloom. CFB has already changed forever anyway, and this is just one more step in cementing the new version of CFB for years to come. After all, for quite a few years we’ve had:

    –Coaches making millions annually, compared to 300k type salaries of old
    –Pointless bowl games like the St. Pete Bowl, Belk bowl, etc. (remember our riveting bowl game vs. UVA in the Oahu Bowl back in ’00?)
    –Non-stop advertising, resulting in ribbon boards, 4 hour games, corporate sponsorship that makes Nascar blush, and such
    –Bands and overall tradition shunned for piped in music, etc. Oh, let’s not forget the “where’s Uga?” game played on the video board, brought to you by Chilk-Fil-A

    I didn’t think we’d see the day where we all wish to return to the glory days of good ol’ BCS football, at least not this quickly anyway, but suddenly the shenanigans associated with that is looking quite attractive.

    Like dumping the cute, girl next door type who loves sports for a hotter chick with bigger boobs, only to soon discover that your new fling has a meth problem and enjoys moonlighting as a stripper.

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    • Joe Schmoe

      The problem with your analogy is that the fans didn’t choose to dump what they had. It’s more like our greedy uncle forcing us to dump the girl next door while promising that the stripper will make all our dreams come true. Then we find out we have to pay her to take her clothes off and the sex feels forced and mechanical.

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      • Cojones

        Yeah, but with a stripper it feels forced and mechanical?

        While trying to be humorous, you should know that I wouldn’t be able to perform in a paid-for encounter. The thought of action without emotion or romance maketh the thingy go down.

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        • Gurkha Dawg

          You’re such a romantic Cojo. There’s only two kinds pf pu$$y. Old and new.

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          • Cojones

            Thought it was “Sameold and new.”. Anyway, I’ll take new. It goes better with Kama Sutra.

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            • Gurkha Dawg

              You are correct sir, thanks for clarifying. That simple statement explains a lot about why men get into trouble. I don’t recommend trying to explain it to the wife.

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              • Cojones

                I’ve tried and have the lumps to prove it. The lumps were better than the threatened “Philipino haircut” which is accomplished with a knife below the waistline and the spelling of it has omitted a “p”.

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        • Joe Schmoe

          Cojo – that’s what makes the analogy work. We traded love making with the girl next door to screwing with a non-interested professional.

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      • 3rdandGrantham

        Fair point JS, but, IMO, in a way we actually did choose to dump the girl next door. After all, we’re the ones who have put a greater emphasis on football, winning, beating out our rivals, and such. We willfully pay more for tickets, contributions, parking, etc., and in return we expect our beloved program to keep up with the joneses when it comes to recruiting, facilities, and of course, winning. Those who think all of this stems from ESPN cramming CFB down our throats are kidding themselves.

        If ESPN suddenly decided to start pimping and otherwise marketing/televising SEC golf, I can promise you that not much would change overall. Attendance wouldn’t go up, neither would ticket prices and you certainly wouldn’t have a sudden arms race as to who has the best golf course/facilities in effort to attract the best HS golf recruits.

        ESPN simply is giving us more of what we want, which is a sport that has grown by stratospheric levels in popularity in just the last 10-15 years.

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  10. DawgByte

    It’s all the evil NCAA’s fault. They’ve also caused ‘Secular Stagnation’ and voted to go to war in Iraq!

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  11. Gcock87

    Gloom and doom.

    It depends on how you define college football. Maybe this is a dichotomy between younger and older fans. The college football playoffs have taken the right step to identify an undisputed champion. This was achieved at the expensive of stripping a BCS title from a handful of bowls that had quasi meaning and possibly diminishing a few other prestigious bowls outside of the BCS bowls.

    I think it’s funny that the coaches complaining about the CFP in this article are the coaches who stand to lose bonus payments from winning a BCS bowl. There were more BCS bowl spots than there are CFP spots. A FSU program that misses the CFP doesn’t have a BCS spot to land and receive BCS bowl bonus payment.

    If you want to fix this then offer a larger CFP of 12 teams or so, and now the same amount BCS spots are available to teams (AND you have a chance to make a title run). Very few fans get excited about attending the Outback or Duck Commander bowl, nor is there a sanctity to them anymore (if there ever was).

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  12. Tommy

    “A lot of young men get a lot of … self gratification from being able to go to a bowl game…”

    Thanks, Nick. Hell of an image to start my morning with.

    Like

  13. Bulldog Joe

    If Nick or Jimbo had won the playoff, we would be hearing a different tune.

    Adding a game made their job more difficult.

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  14. Claw

    Nobody paid attention to games before the playoffs because they’re all just meaningless money grab match ups. Say what you want about the playoffs being a money grab, but at least they aren’t matching up NIU and FSU, or UGA and Hawaii.

    http://www.cbssports.com/collegefootball/eye-on-college-football/21486785/major-bowl-tv-ratings-mostly-up-but-attendance-mostly-down

    Like

    • MGW

      Its not just a pre and post playoff problem. Its been veering off this way all through the BCS till now. Before the playoff it was one game (and throughout the BCS it slowly devolved into that… early 2000’s people got pumped about Sugar/Cotton/Rose/Orange bowl victories). Now its 3 (and still only 1 in hindsight). Before the BCS it was more like 8 real games that teams and fans took a lot of pride in for winning… and most of the rest of the bowls were still exciting for the lesser teams of the year. There was just respect for a good season overall… now its national championship or bust and its freaking boring.

      Point is the playoff hasn’t fixed a thing. Its better than the BCS, but its not a fix at all.

      Like

  15. But lets not be fooled here by the true intent of Jimbo and Nick. They bring up these concerns NOT because they are worried about the value of the regular season or the importance of bowls. They bring this up because with the playoffs, the bar just got set a little bit higher. Fair or unfair, more coaches now will not be able to fall back on a major bowl win. Most will be asked “why didn’t we make the playoffs?” or in the case of FSU and Bama, “why didn’t we win the championship?”

    Although Nick and Jimbo make a case that that speaks to many of the issues brought up in this blog, nobody should be fooled by there true self serving interest here. “For the good of college football” should usually be replaced by the true meaning “for the good of my coaching career” and there you have it.

    Like

    • MGW

      I don’t buy it.

      $4,000,000+ is a lot of money for a year’s work, but nobody works like these guys (literally all day every day 24/7/365) without a sincere love for what they’re doing. If you think just because they’re a couple of guys who have been winning big lately and because for like a year they haven’t, they’re all upset trying to blame some system cause they’re worried about their jobs, you’re crazy. Its an awesome job and I’m sure they’d love to keep it, but it ain’t just business. And I don’t even like either of those two guys.

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      • Not saying they don’t love what they do, but the skeptic in me puts self interest first. Perhaps I’m just jaded when I hear Saban give questionable kids “second chances” out of the goodness of his heart.

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  16. Claw

    Also, the SEC lost it’s regional appeal when the added Texas A&M and Mizzou neither of which are in the south, and why did they add them? TV money.

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  17. JCDAWG83

    As more and more people, especially young people, choose to cut the cord on cable tv, I wonder when the tipping point will be reached that ESPN and the sports networks can no longer charge the cable providers enough to pump billions into college sports? I read recently that if cable companies had to unbundle their programming and charge for networks individually, ESPN would cost about $36 a month. I doubt there are enough people out there willing to pay that much for ESPN that the network could continue to pump the money into the conferences. I feel safe in saying college sports are experiencing something of a “bubble” and it’s only a matter of time before it bursts.

    I feel like the general fans are about at their saturation point with being marketed to during college sporting events. College sports are very close to being where NASCAR was in the 90’s. They have great popularity and a loyal fan base and the money is pouring in and the powers that be are patting themselves on the back and feeling like there’s nothing but blue skies ahead. Like NASCAR did, ESPN, the NCAA, the conferences, the athletic associations and the cable networks may be about to reach a little too far and ruin the good thing they built because of greed and hubris. Once the fans have enough, the drop off will be fast and severe. Already, the factors are there to turn off the fans. Commercials on the jumbotron, four hour games because of commercial breaks, noon kickoffs against terrible teams, piped in music, and higher and higher cost to attend games are all combining to make attending a college game a less than enjoyable experience. The fans will not have any sort of revolt, they will simply decide it’s not worth the trouble to go and will do something else and the college sports powers that be will be looking around wondering what happened.

    Attendance at college games is already dropping everywhere but the SEC. We don’t see it so we don’t think about it. Last season, attendance was down by 1000 people per game on average. At $40 a ticket for 12 games, that’s about a half a million dollars a season in lost revenue not counting concessions, souvenirs, etc. While that’s not a ton of money in the grand scheme of things, it’s important to remember that most floods start with a few drops of rain.

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    • Great post, JC. You’re pointing out the canary in the coal mine, but I don’t think the suits that run college sports are self-aware enough to understand this.

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      • JCDAWG83

        I imagine the ADs, cable and network execs being like the railroad barons in the early 1900’s making fun of those newfangled “horseless carriages” and “flying machines”.

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  18. RocketDawg

    The point was raised in an earlier comment about this being a “young fan vs old fan” debate and I am curious as to how our ages (and past experiences with CFB) shape our view on what is going on and how the sport will evolve in the future.

    For the record I am 43, I went to my first UGA game in 1978 with my uncle. I grew up in the Dooley years when we won games 13-10 and listened to Munson on the radio when we didn’t go to the game. The goal every year was to beat Clemson (we played them every year then), beat Ole Miss, beat Florida, beat Auburn, and beat Tech. A 8-3, 9-2, 8-2-1, record was considered a pretty good year and the players were students just like everyone else. I won’t talk about the Goff or Donnan years as those were pretty painful.

    I feel like the sport changed with the birth of the BCS, no longer was a good season quantified by beating your rivals and winning the conference championship, it is get to the BCS or bust. This was further intensified by the run of SEC/BCS champions from 2006-2013. We as UGA fans saw everyone in our neighborhood with a shiny new trophy and we wanted one too. Now it has become win the CFB playoffs or you suck and we need to fire our coach. This almost guarantees that 121 college football fan bases are going to be disappointed and pissed off after every season. I also feel like some of this mentality comes from the younger part of the fan base that is fueled by a world of instant gratification and social media. The nastiness between fan bases on social media is ridiculous. It is almost a mindset of “I don’t want to lose to team X because I don’t want to hear about it on my Facebook page afterward”, I had to block several of my Tech friends after we lost to them this year because it went beyond the “trash talk” of a rivalry game and got personal. There were many friendships damaged over the 2010 Auburn season as well due to the same reason.

    I personally don’t like where this is going and I have a feeling that by the time my son gets to college no one will really care about the regular season because we have “PLAYOFFS BABY” with the 32 team bracket starting in mid November.

    RIP College Football.

    Like

    • JCDAWG83

      I went to my first Georgia game in ’69, saw Georgia beat Tulane. They might as well have beaten Michigan to win the national title in my 8 year old eyes. I was that excited about being there.

      I grew up with Dooley, endured Goff, had my heart broken by Donnan (I really thought he was going to get it done) and now, I’m living with the annual bed crappings of Richt. I think the thing that has changed college football the most is cable tv. Until the 90’s, Georgia might be on tv twice a season,if we were lucky, plus the bowl game. Now, every game is televised and the tv money has raised the pay and the facilities of every coach and program. 8 wins and a decent bowl used to be a good season. Now, with coaches making millions, stadiums expanded, ticket costs soaring, the expectations are so much higher. When the coach is being paid like a local doctor, the expectations have some room for error and forgiveness. When the coach is paid like the CEO of a large national corporation, there isn’t (and shouldn’t be) much, if any, margin for error.

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      • Debby Balcer

        Since all coaches are paid that well and some one has to lose how can there be no room for error. In the SEC west most coaches are making around four million and some unjust barely made a bowl game. Richt’s salary does not mean he should win the NC or the SEC. He earns what the market brings.

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  19. Cojones

    Dang! Some of you guys need a cookie.

    Like

    • About those cookies….seriously.. Do I grind up the medicine in the coffee grinder? Or should I use a cuisinart?🎈. AHD, DIF, (Son). Anybody? Bueller, Bueller….anybody?🌴🍄

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  20. anon

    hopefully it wont diminish the accomplishment (when that time comes) of Richt being the all-time leader in Outback bowl appearances.

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  21. I have never had a shortage of things to do on a fall Saturday. ESPN doesn’t realize that we liked college football because it IS NOT the NFL.

    Too bad.

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  22. 69Dawg

    There has been a real change in the attitude at the games over the last 20 years. The fans of both schools used to be civil to the other side and even gracious winners and losers. The new generation of fans want to fight, literally. The winners are obnoxious and the losers are aggressive. I am an old fart and I’ll admit it. I stopped going to the WLOCP because I got tired of being cussed by the Gator fans when they won and really cussed by them when on the rare occasion we won. In the old days both groups of fans would have good fun with each other before and after the game. Now it’s like running the gauntlet to get the hell out of the stadium and back to the car/bus. I quit going to UT for the same reason. Even in Athens the crowd is increasingly belligerent. The younger UGA fans will cuss the players and coaches and want to fight with any UGA fan that dares to disagree. I wouldn’t take my kids to a game at all, unless I knew the group I was sitting around. Anyway, get the hell off my lawn.

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  23. Scorpio Jones, III

    What the playoff means, is that if you don’t make the playoff, you have had a failed season, especially in the minds (or whatever passes for minds) of the national championship or bust folks.

    With the 85 scholarship limit, its the folks who manage their rosters effectively, recruit like hell and get lucky at the right time who get the shots at the playoffs.

    One serious injury to a key player, you center for instance, or the punter…guys you can only go so deep on, and you are out of the picture.

    Unless, of course, you red-shirt, gray-shirt and generally push the scholarship limit envelope any way you can so that you wind up with two or three top flight players at quarterback, for instance.

    No program, not even Bama or TOSU, can stand the constant pressure, even with a watered down NCAA looking over their shoulders.

    You can look at making the playoffs as a once in a decade thing, enjoy each game and move on, or not.

    It is all about how you chose to support your team, what your expectations of your team are.

    Hope is a great thing, or a terrible thing, depending on your attitude, but if your university is not willing or not able to institutionally commit to pushing every envelope in the rule book, hope is all you got.

    I saw every Georgia game from 1980-83. Got a Munson-narrated tape of every year. Got pictures in my mind of Herschel doing his ballerina move at Ole Miss and running over Bill Bates.

    Good God Almighty I am glad I had that run. That thing there, those three years of Georgia football are probably the best we will ever have.

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  24. Cojones

    Too bad you weren’t around to see’um when their Happy Dicks played.

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    • Scorpio Jones, III

      The hell I warn’t Cojo…saw him intercept a pass in the end zone, lying on his back, in Jackson, Mississippi whilst playing Missy State. Lost my rental car in the damn parking lot, there.

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  25. Don’t forgit Theron Sapp you dang bunch of whippersnappers.

    Like

    • Scorpio Jones, III

      That was one of the first Tech games my daddy let me go to. Suffice to say going was not a problem from then on. 🙂

      I don’t know what year it was, but the first game I saw, sitting on wooden bleachers in the north stands, Zippy Morrocco had a long punt return for a touchdown. Holy shit, that makes me older than the dirt under the grass, there.

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      • I have a great Zippy Morocco story…… vacationing at a friend’s condo in Santa Rosa Beach FLA. Out jogging one morning and was in my usual Dawgs athletic apparel. Don’t remember how and why I started talking to a 30 something couple outside their very nice beach front house. The man turns to his girlfriend/wife in a joking/rub it in kind of manner says”watch this……your a Georgia fan?” I respond,”Absolutely”He asks,” do you know who Zippy Morocco is?” I immediately responded that he was Georgia’s greatest punt returner of all time(apologies to Scott Woerner,Damien Gary and Buzzy Rosenberg)). The great part was watching his rather attractive girlfriend get really pissed off as she tells me,”This SOB has been drinking all week for free just because he is the grandson of some SOB I’ve never heard of” I don’t know why I like that story so much but I like to think it makes the DawgNation look good……we are everywhere.

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