Mark Richt’s Open Records request

Jon Solomon fleshes out a lot more details about what people in the SEC are concerned about when it comes to the COA calculations each school goes through.  There really is a lot involved.

Auburn has one of the SEC’s highest cost-of attendance averages at $5,586. However, even that figure is not a one-size, fits-all calculation and can vary based on whether the student is in-state or out-of-state and whether there are other personal needs provided to the financial aid office, Auburn athletic director Jay Jacobs said.

“If you live in Birmingham and I live in Auburn, if I go through the financial aid process, my number could be lower than yours because I live closer to Auburn,” Jacobs said. “But if I have a child, then my child care could increase and you may not. Ours is an average number so it could fluctuate.”

Mississippi State has an average cost of attendance figure of $5,156. Bulldogs athletic director Scott Stricklin supports SEC schools sharing within the league who’s getting cost of attendance exceptions, how much those exceptions are worth, and how often players receive them.

“To me, that’s helpful to know,” Stricklin said. “If our campus is rewarding on average four to six appeals per semester and all of a sudden our student-athletes have 40 to 50 winning appeals, I’d think if I’m another school I’d want to know that.”

So, yeah, enquiring minds – in this case SEC coaches and ADs – want to know.  And Mark Richt wants to get all Pork Rind Jimmy over it.

“I’m curious to know how they get to their numbers,” said Georgia coach Mark Richt, whose school’s cost of attendance average is $3,221 for in-state students and $3,746 for out-of-state. “I’m sure a lot of people are curious about that. Do you (reporters) want to know? You got open records law? Can you all ask and find out?”

Um… guys, I don’t think he’s kidding there.  Help a head coach out.

24 Comments

Filed under Recruiting, SEC Football

24 responses to “Mark Richt’s Open Records request

  1. I just heard from a reliable source that Jacob Park is transferring. I’m sure I will get flamed, but I don’t post often and I’m not a troll. I don’t want to post my source because I don’t want it to get out who told me.

    Like

  2. Bright Idea

    So COA is going to cover child care if an Auburn player has a child, or two, or three? What if the child lives elsewhere with the mother? Auburn is stretching the imagination on finally being able to pay players legally.

    Like

  3. Ben

    I’m surprised no one has filed an open records request yet. If this had happened at Arkansas when Nutt was there, those people would’ve been all over it. Maybe Alabama/Auburn beat writers don’t want to burn bridges and maybe other beat writers don’t want to waste time.

    Like

  4. Emerson”s on this mother, right?

    Like

    • Bulldog Joe

      Shhh. My bet is the first open records request will come to UGA from the AJC asking them to explain how they got to $3,221 when UGA originally announced it at $1,798.

      Seeing how The Georgia Way responds is sure to be funny and sad at the same time.

      Like

  5. Smitty

    Yes because the cost of living in Alabama & Mississippi is soooo high…..

    Like

    • Dog in Fla

      Good luck with the cost of living and dying in 3/4 time in the Heart of Dixie and the Magnolia State

      Like

  6. 69Dawg

    This is the camels nose under the tent. We are about to witness an all out free for all, the likes of which we have never seen in CFB. If the NCAA lets it happen, which I think they have to, then schools like Auburn will not be controllable. I can hear the AD asking the usual suspects to donate to the “Student-Athlete COA Fund Foundation” to pay our players and get that tax deduction, which in the past you have not been able to enjoy. Hell lets get these COA’s endowed so we can really kick some ass. Adopt a player will be the new thing. Hell UGA already has an annual dinner where the donors get to eat with the players whose scholarship they endow. Think what Auburn et.al. can do now.

    Like