“No it wasn’t a great coaching decision or anything like that.”

Aww, Coach, don’t be so modest about it.

Actually, after reading the background behind the decision to insert Isaiah McKenzie into the game yesterday as a punt returner, I realize Richt wasn’t being modest, just accurate.

Richt told reporters afterwards that McKenzie, who was in the dog house due to his decision making, was returning the punt because freshman Terry Godwin made a couple of mistakes earlier in the game.

“When Terry got in there, he wasn’t alerting everybody when the ball was kicked short…,” Richt said. “And after the first time, he didn’t do it and we coached him up. And then the second time he didn’t do it and we put Isaiah in. And that was a good thing.

Let that sink in for a moment.  McKenzie was in the dog house due to decision making, but seeing as he hadn’t fielded a punt in weeks, where else could that have happened?

Freshman Terry Godwin fielded Georgia’s earlier punt returns. Head coach Mark Richt said he decided to start Godwin in that role because McKenzie had made bad decisions during punt returns in practice.

I’m going to pass on the obvious snark about Reggie Davis’ decision making and focus instead on the wisdom of keeping a kid who walked off the field yesterday tied for Georgia’s all-time mark in returns for touchdowns and punt returns for touchdowns – in less than two seasons, mind you – on the sideline because you don’t like the way he practices.  At some point the reluctance to deploy a major weapon, in a season in which you don’t have too many of those, is insane.

Put it this way:  I’ll bet Logan Gray was one helluva practice player.  I don’t remember his punt returns being much of a game changer, though.

Don’t watch McKenzie field punts in practice, if that lets you sleep better at night. But get his ass on the field.

97 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

97 responses to ““No it wasn’t a great coaching decision or anything like that.”

  1. Mayor

    Better to say nothing and appear the foot than to speak and remove all doubt.

    Like

  2. gastr1

    More evidence, to me at least, that Richt is more concerned with teaching them to be responsible adults (practice= emphasis on the process rather than the outcome) versus winning games. Which is great if you coach at Rice, or Georgia Southern, or an FCS school or something.

    Like

  3. Insane? How about just plain dumb.

    Like

  4. TennesseeDawg

    The more we hear this kind of stuff, the more I think we win games in spite of Richt sometimes

    Like

  5. Yeah I get that you have to reward/punish guys for their practice habits to an extent, but with a specialized thing like returns, for the most part guys have a knack for it or they don’t. And he’s proven that he has it. Coaching can help a guy to an extent with decision making, but few guys just have that natural knack for creating big returns. To waste that is a bit of head scratcher, for sure.

    Like

    • gastr1

      There was a moment in the Alabama game where McKenzie tried to make a catch of a short punt, dropped it, then recovered. The announcer (Danielson, I think) praised him for trying to be aggressive, make a play, take a chance. Then he went to the sideline and the camera caught Richt lecturing him on trying to be aggressive, make a play, take a chance.

      Like

  6. Normaltown Mike

    This ranks up there with Hitler’s invasion of Russia and CMR red shirting Knowshon as another great episodes in “History’s Greatest Disasters”

    Like

  7. Napoleon BonerFart

    I used to dismiss people who claimed “inside knowledge” of Richt playing one kid over another based on feelings or favoritism. P5 coaches play the kids that will help them win games. Aside from a serious issue like Jonathan Taylor’s, there’s no way Richt would harm the team’s chances to win just to prove a point. Apparently, I stand corrected.

    Next year, I will be the first to believe that Jacob Eason killed it at the G-Day game and in scrimmages, but won’t play because he’s not a Baptist, or something.

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  8. Denver94

    Filed under The Georgia Way.

    Like

  9. mikebozo

    As bad as our special teams has been and you sit your most explosive player because he had a bad practice. Just stoopid

    Like

  10. Let me get this straight … the fanbase, in all its infinite wisdom, wants coaches to ignore what they see out of players in practice.

    That’s what the fanbase wants?

    Good thing we don’t pay the fanbase to coach football games.

    Like

    • shane#1

      OhYeah!? Well you weren’t around me yesterday when my Lady was at a baby shower. Uncensored and plenty of beers. If CMR had just listened they would have wiped AU off the map. I know Richt could near me, I was loud enough.

      Like

    • Uga86

      This. Let’s keep finding asinine nit-picky things to bitch about. A win’s a win, most notably against a rival.

      Like

    • Ben, you’re a good one to ask this question: ever heard of players who were not so hot in practice, but produced in games?

      I would say the fanbase wants players who hold school records in touchdown returns to see the field, but maybe that’s just me.

      Like

      • mikebozo

        Exactly Bluto. Take Lambert coaches say he looks good in practice but in the game (s)……well….

        Like

      • Yeah? Lambert has an NCAA record. Does the fanbase love him? I’m just looking for the common thread here. It’s records, right? As long as a guy has a record, we want him to always be the guy?

        Like

        • mikebozo

          1 game does not make him a superstar. Now if he was consistent I would agree

          Like

        • Oy.

          It’s not about records. It’s about production. As someone else noted in the comments, McKenzie has a TD return roughly once every nine times he fields a return. This season, he’s returned 12 punts and scored twice.

          Who’s your better option, Ben? The kid who looks best in practice? Who is that?

          Maybe if nobody is getting the job done in practice, Richt should just do away with having a kick returner altogether.

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    • gastr1

      No one said ignore, I don’t think. Maybe re-read Reverend Whitewall’s comment above, for example, and weigh in with a more considered comment about this, given your far more insightful experience with it?

      Thanks in advance for being thoughtful versus reactionary, Ben, and for your willingness to put your name in your handle.

      Like

    • By the way, your snark might resonate more if McKenzie weren’t being replaced by (1) Reggie Davis, who has his own decision making issues and (2) Terry Godwin, who was benched for McKenzie for not responding to being coached up on returns.

      Like

    • Napoleon BonerFart

      I think ignoring practice is better than ignoring games. But, I’ve never been in the arena.

      Like

    • South FL Dawg

      Ben,
      I thought the same thing – that you can’t just ignore practice. But I don’t think that’s what anyone is saying. Our offense is hardly scoring. If you’ve got to take a chance on something, where would you like to take it? I’m going to guess that there haven’t been many great return men that didn’t take some chances their coaches cringed at.

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      • Again, the fan’s sample-size is much smaller than the coaches’. Sure, we can sit here and say, OOOH look, he scores TDs! They’re idiots for not having him in every single play.

        Sony Michel has done some amazing things, too … but he doesn’t always.
        A player can go from savior to skunk in about 3.2 seconds.

        As a coach, you HAVE to look at practice. You can’t sit back and think “Oh man, this kid did this thing once, he’ll do it every time in a game.” You just can’t. We don’t know what the decision making problems were, but here’s the thing with it – Special Teams has been an issue.

        So, let’s look at a decision-making process.

        1) Don’t put Reggie back there. He has proven too many times to not be clutch. So, we gotta find a new guy.

        2) In PRACTICE, Isiah isn’t doing what the coaches want to see. Maybe he’s fumbling. Maybe he’s not paying attention to where he is on the field. Maybe he’s fielding balls in too much traffic.

        3) In PRACTICE, Godwin IS doing what the coaches want to see.

        I don’t think any UGA fan is going to say Terry Godwin isn’t a playmaker. So, essentially, if you have two playmakers, and one is performing how you ask him to in practice, and the other isn’t, which do you go with?

        You go with the one who performs the way you ask him to.

        Then, the game comes. You have your player. He underperforms. You replace him with the other player because you’ve tried to coach up the first one, and he isn’t performing as you’re asking him to.

        ^^^^ That is called a good coaching decision.

        And Senator, to your other question – no, I personally do not recall a player who was constantly off in practice, but lights-out in games. Then again, maybe that’s because the coaches I’ve been around didn’t have a tendency to dole out tons of playing time to guys who sucked at practice.

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        • So, let’s look at a decision-making process.

          1) Don’t put Reggie back there. He has proven too many times to not be clutch. So, we gotta find a new guy.

          2) In PRACTICE, Isiah isn’t doing what the coaches want to see. Maybe he’s fumbling. Maybe he’s not paying attention to where he is on the field. Maybe he’s fielding balls in too much traffic.

          3) In PRACTICE, Godwin IS doing what the coaches want to see.

          It’s a nice story. How do we know it’s the case?

          As a side remark, this is also the staff that thought Faton Bauta could spark the team against Florida, based on what they saw in practice.

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          • Scorpio Jones, III

            Bluto, we don’t know if Ben’s story is the case because we don’t go to practice. As fans, our player assessment criteria is always different than the coaches’ assessment criteria.

            All the coaches I know, or have known had the attitude that you won the starting job in practice, you kept the starting job by your play in the game.

            Because we may have a different idea about who should or should not start at any position is nice to talk about if that sort of thing entertains you, but that’s all it is.

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            • Bluto, we don’t know if Ben’s story is the case because we don’t go to practice.

              Um… that was a rhetorical question. Meaning, I kinda, sorta knew that. But thanks for checking.

              Because we may have a different idea about who should or should not start at any position is nice to talk about if that sort of thing entertains you, but that’s all it is.

              It’s a blog. I thought that’s how I’m supposed to write. What would you prefer I devote posting to?

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              • Scorpio Jones, III

                I have never not understood the point of view you take when you post. What concerns me, not that there is anything you can do about it, is that your opinion, t’would seem, is taken as gospel by folks who seem to think they know more about football than the coaching staff.

                I find this unfortunate, but again, what can you do?

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                • It’s unfortunate when people agree with me?

                  McKenzie’s returned punts on and off for almost two seasons now. He’s benched because of practice habits, but suddenly reinserted into the role when the other two who got a crack at the job couldn’t perform in games. What exactly, then, did practice have to do with anything? Other than keep our most prolific punt returner off the field, that is.

                  That was a rhetorical question, too, by the way.

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                • Scorpio Jones, III

                  “Other than keep our most prolific punt returner off the field, that is.”

                  So the reported hamstring problem had nothing to do with any of it, right?

                  That, too, is a rhetorical question.

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                • Clever. But that’s better directed at the guy who said he wasn’t returning punts because of his practice work, don’t you think? Unless Richt was making that up…

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          • Russ

            Senator, it’s also the same staff that thought Bauta could spark the them, and then called EXACTLY the same shitty plays for him.

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        • gastr1

          Terry Godwin is a not a playmaker at the level of Isaiah McKenzie when returning punts.

          There, I said it. I’m a fan that said it.

          Like

    • JonDawg

      Get outta here with your sanity and reason.. can’t you see all the dead horses lying around?

      Like

  11. DawgByte

    “Don’t watch McKenzie field punts in practice, if that lets you sleep better at night. But get his ass on the field.”

    Agree. Some of the personnel decisions are mind blowing!

    Like

  12. Bulldog Joe

    I-Mac’s trips to the doghouse were well-deserved. He lost a fumble and had blocking issues last week, and hasn’t always taken care of his decisions off the field.

    He has a great opportunity at the next level if he can take care of these things.

    Like

    • Dolly Llama

      What are these “decisions off the field” that everyone’s talking about? What’s he done?

      Like

      • mikebozo

        No chance of anything but a 2nd or 3rd tier bowl. How can you sit your most explosive player on special teams……then when he gets the chance he takes it to the house and that was the WINNING SCORE, but we are dumb and the coaches are really smart. Everybody fumbles, Sony, Godwin, this team is going for wins and that is the only thing that matters for the rest of the season. No IMac returns everything including kickoffs. Anything else is just stoopid.

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  13. Derek

    You don’t do it the way you are coached, then you don’t play, period. If you want to see a team where they play the most talented player no matter whether he listens or just does it his own way and the plane will crash into the mountain. McKenzie, if I recall correctly, had an issue fielding a punt earlier this year and has also had ball security issues running with the ball. He has also been banged up. Bottom line he has been high risk high reward. The first thing you have to do after a punt is WE HAVE THE BALL. To the extent that 16 has been forced to focus on that issue first is a good thing, an essential thing.

    BTW: if you think Pruitt would start a kid who did it his way because he got a lot of INT’s then you haven’t been paying attention. If you want to identify a coach on the staff who would give the strongest argument against this complaint that 16 should return punts no matter how he prepares, it wouldn’t be CMR, it would be CJP.

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    • You don’t do it the way you are coached, then you don’t play, period.

      Except McKenzie played yesterday.

      So much for dramatic use of punctuation.

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      • Dawgfan Will

        Necessity is the mother of TDs?

        Like

      • Derek

        You gotta put somebody back there. 5 didn’t do it the was he was coached. Twice. 5 didn’t do it the way he was coached so he didn’t play anymore, period, Next man up. 16 was next. The other alternative is playing guys no matter how they practice. There are maybe 10 guys in the history of football that could play and practice however they wanted. Jim Brown, LT…. 16 ain’t one of them.

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      • mikebozo

        Not played but STARTED….

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        • Derek

          BOZO, the position we are all referring to is PUNT RETURNER BOZO.

          BOZO, Godwin kept playing WR after he messed up PUNT RETURNING twice BOZO.

          BOZO you do understand that WR and PR are different positions BOZO?

          BOZO, Sony may get practice reps at KR and not do it right and still start at TB BOZO.

          Did you pick BOZO so that every post you make is automatically redundant BOZO?

          You tell us its coming and you never disappoint.

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          • mikebozo

            I will never be as smart as you think you are derek. I know you are in love with richt and have a life sized picture of him taped on the ceiling above your bed.

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    • Napoleon BonerFart

      I agree that McKenzie has risks. But high risk, high reward beats the hell out of high risk, low reward. And that’s what Reggie Davis has been.

      It also beats the old, Logan Gray days of no risk, no reward.

      If we don’t have any returners who can make great decisions, let’s at least play the one who will break one for a touchdown a few times a season.

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  14. Dawgfan Will

    I’ve got to side with those who say this is much ado about nothing. The kid is a weapon at returner, but earlier in the season, he was a liability more than once. Godwin showed during the Missouri game he could do the job as well. All it would have taken yesterday was another bad decision to flip field position and we’d be shouting about why McKenzie was still out there.

    Now if you want to complan about running out of the shotgun inside the 5 yard line, I’m all ears…

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    • gastr1

      “All it would have taken yesterday was another bad decision to flip field position and we’d be shouting about why McKenzie was still out there”– I don’t know that that’s true. McKenzie has demonstrated his significant return ability on many occasions.

      Like

      • Dawgfan Will

        Don’t get me wrong: I want McKenzie fielding punts. But I didn’t hear anyone complaining earlier when Godwin had taken his place while he was injured.

        Like

        • gastr1

          “while he was injured” –you mean, you expected people to be complaining about Richt not getting McKenzie back out there even though he was hurt?

          I suspect that’s not what you meant, but what did you mean? Godwin was competent and didn’t fumble, but obviously there were issues we couldn’t see. But who would be asking to get him out of there for Davis or a Logan Gray-type player? McKenzie is clearly better despite Godwin’s clear competence, and I don’t recall McKenzie fumbling or bumbling so often that he was costing us balls in the red zone every game. I think the stats bear me out on that.

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          • Dawgfan Will

            Okay. Let me put it this way. I think this is a non-issue because if McKenzie’s practice issues, whatever they may be, had showed up in the game and cost us not only the TD he scored, but field position that might have led to an Auburn score, we’d be raking Richt over the coals for putting him in. Again, I’m glad he was in, but griping about the reason he was in seems strange to me because of the result.

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  15. GATA Dawg

    A lot of the reason he has not played has been the hamstring. Don’t read to much into the comment.

    Like

  16. TennesseeDawg

    Over the course of his career at #UGA Isaiah McKenzie returns a kick/punt for a TD about every 9 times he catches one.— Dawgs247 (@Dawgs247) November 15, 2015

    //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

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  17. JT (the other one)

    Sigh.
    The Georgia Way….
    Always play it safe even when the safe=inserting playmakers.

    Like

  18. Coastal Dawg

    I think the issues with iMac are more with discipline that talent. After both his dramitic TDs yesterday he flirted dangerously with celebration penatlies. After his first TD he almost pulled a Miami going into the tunnel. Thankfully the ref didn’t pull the flag but did admonish him. When he got to the sideline CMR had his arm around him adn I assume was in his ear over the same thing. After the return he was more subdued, but again pushed the limit. Again, It think the refs understood this was a big play in a big rivalry game and opted not to go all Penn Wagers on either team.

    My point is iMac does have a history of letting his emotions getiing away from him. I mean its not like he is a coach who gets so excited he almosts concusses a player…..

    Like

  19. Explains why Lambert plays every snap. He must be hell in the film room and with the green no contact jersey on in practice

    Like

  20. Cosmic Dawg

    I can understand both sides of this. With no offense this year, you have to manufacture points however you can. However, we’ve also been howling about special teams mistakes and worshiping at the shrine of Saban’s process-oriented system that rewards doing it right every time.

    Godwin started after iMac wasn’t doing it the way he wanted. When Godwin regressed, iMac got another chance. I’d prefer to have iMac fielding punts, but I have no idea how he’s acting or what he’s doing in practice.

    Like

  21. lakedawg

    help me understand this, Davis gets benched for fielding a punt inside ten yard and possibly costing a ball game, “fans” gripe because coaches did not tell him to not do so. Godwin does not wave clear out on not one but two punts that could have cost a ball game “fans” gripe either because he was benched or coaches failed to teach him that. IMac does not listen to coaching in practice and in game and get coached and “fans” gripe. Gripe, gripe gripe, so called “fans”

    Like

  22. W Cobb Dawg

    All I can say is don’t tell Pruitt about the episode. He’ll want to kick somebody’s ass.

    Like

  23. Dawg Stephen

    while i think its dumb to not have him out there to start with… i DO give credit to PULL Terry Godwin and put him in.. i mean he messed up, got scolded and DID IT AGAIN…insert I-mac…and. there goes McKenzie!!!!! So thank God they at least were willing to sub…. right???

    Like

  24. John Denver is full of shit...

    what the hell was #15 doing?

    Like

  25. Turd Ferguson

    It’s almost as if having talented players isn’t enough. You need coaches who know best how to manage the talent on the roster.

    Crazy how that works.

    Like

  26. hailtogeorgia

    Granted, I’m not present at practices, but I really don’t see the issue/complaint here. McKenzie had the job, then lost it by not practicing well. Godwin goes in and performs below expectations, so Richt puts McKenzie back in (with what seems to be the same logic you’re employing, Senator, which is if we are running the risk of a poor decision, might as well have McKenzie in the game).

    It sure seems like a completely reasonable process, unless you’re of the opinion that Godwin performed in the game the same way he performed in practice and the coaches still chose him over McKenzie. That does not appear to be the case, but if it were, then yes, that’s incredible.

    Senator, you’ve been harping on special teams play and on not turning the ball over, particularly with regard to this game, then you’re turning around and putting Richt through the ringer for playing the player that he thought, based on performance in practice, would make better decisions in the game (and be less likely to turn the ball over on a punt return). What gives? I understand that McKenzie has a higher ceiling than Godwin, but it’s not like Godwin is chopped liver here (and he’s a damned sight better than Logan Gray). If Richt were benching McKenzie for Gray, it’s one thing, but to bench him for Godwin isn’t THAT terrible of a drop-off in my opinion.

    Like

    • gastr1

      Criminy, man. “What gives” is that McKenzie’s play during games has suggested, for a while now, that he’s the best option at “game” KR regardless what happened in “practice” KR. And he showed it yet again vs Awbarn. There are how many comments here that hash that out in fifty-leven ways??

      Like

      • hailtogeorgia

        How, exactly, do you know that? Have you been at the practices? Did you see the mistakes that led to the coaching staff deciding to insert Godwin over him? I’m not saying that McKenzie isn’t incredibly talented at the position, but if he’s having issues in practice (making poor decisions, fumbling the ball, whatever may have led to him being benched), it’s only a matter of time before those issues show themselves in a game. As much as I love watching him play, I’m not blind to the fact that he has not always shown the best decision-making on punt returns. Add to that the fact that he has five fumbles in short career and it’s clear that there are some chinks in the armor.

        Ideally, he gets it together and secures the job going forward so that this isn’t an issue any longer. I don’t see why Richt is being criticized for trying Godwin at the position though; he’s averaging slightly more yards per return than McKenzie – in what is admittedly a small sample size, only four returns – so if he’s demonstrating an ability to make better decisions and take care of the ball, where is the issue? As I said, Godwin is no slouch himself – he’s a five star guy and was the number one rated athlete in the nation last year…we aren’t trotting out some scrub. He didn’t perform as Richt wanted, he got yanked and McKenzie was sent back in…where is the controversy?

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        • I don’t see why Richt is being criticized for trying Godwin at the position though…

          Maybe because that’s not what I’m criticizing Richt about.

          You don’t know any more about what’s going on at practice than the rest of us do, but let me throw out a few things we do know.

          First, if McKenzie is having problems fumbling the ball, it didn’t seem to bother the coaches to let him run fly sweeps all day at Auburn, or to go out on pass patterns. For that matter, if fumbling is a major concern, it didn’t seem to bother the coaches to let Sony Michel, who’s playing with a bad hand, carry the load at running back… or to let Reggie Davis handle kickoffs.

          Second, if practice is that important, aren’t you a little surprised that Brice Ramsey was trusted with that punt out of the end zone, given that he’d never faced that scenario in a game before and, as Richt discussed after the game, had never repped that situation in practice? Given how shaky Barber’s been under pressure, I thought letting Ramsey handle that was the right decision, but it does beg the question – if a kid does well consistently in practice, but doesn’t carry that over to games, how long do you stick with him? Once you’re willing to admit that there is a point where game performance matters, it’s hard to see how you can justify a decision to keep McKenzie off punt returns.

          Finally, between receiving duties and his role in the wildcat, don’t you think Godwin has plenty on his plate already? How thin do you want to spread his practice reps around?

          And to answer your question, there is no controversy… yet. But there will be if they continue to limit McKenzie’s touches because of how he practices. JMHO.

          Like

          • CB

            Catching tosses and passes from you’re own qb is not the same as fielding a punt.

            Like

          • hailtogeorgia

            Okay, you’re criticizing Richt for not playing McKenzie because of how he practiced, despite how electric he can be and has been at times in games. Given that McKenzie got benched for Godwin…but we’re arguing semantics I guess.

            I never said I knew any more about what’s going on at practice than the rest of you do, in fact, I thought that was made clear when I said, “Granted, I’m not present at practices”, and, “if he’s having issues in practice” (which Richt said he has been). I surmised from that information and his past performances that those issues may be making poor decisions or fumbling the ball.

            All snark aside, to get to the main question you raised that was of interest to me,

            if a kid does well consistently in practice, but doesn’t carry that over to games, how long do you stick with him? Once you’re willing to admit that there is a point where game performance matters, it’s hard to see how you can justify a decision to keep McKenzie off punt returns.

            I agree with you that it’s a tough question. Both performances matter, though putting more weight on game performance seems logical and sticking with a guy who looks great in practice but doesn’t perform in the games is obviously flawed. Personally, I’d say it depends on the reps and on what the next man up brings to the table. As with this case, I don’t think Richt was crazy to try Godwin out at the position if he’d been practicing better. Given the intangibles that McKenzie has, Godwin was clearly on a pretty short leash and when he showed an inability to perform in the game, he got yanked in favor of McKenzie. If our punt returner situation was a complete dumpster fire like it was a few years ago, I imagine Godwin would’ve continued with the duties a bit longer.

            Like

            • Given that McKenzie got benched for Godwin…but we’re arguing semantics I guess.

              No, he was benched for Reggie Davis.

              I’m not trying to get into a prissy argument over semantics with you, so if it came off like that, I’m sorry.

              My point is that I am skeptical of what the coaches have done this season with special teams. (Remember after the Florida game, when Richt said the coaches have confidence in Davis? Really?) I have no idea what’s motivating the personnel calls, but from where I sit, there isn’t a kid who’s been entrusted with returning punts without warts. And the reality is that McKenzie has a much higher ceiling than does either Davis or Godwin.

              Going forward, I don’t see where this is a tough call, in other words.

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        • Napoleon BonerFart

          I don’t really see Godwin and McKenzie as equally as you do. I agree that Godwin’s no slouch. And he’s not being asked to fair catch everything. But McKenzie is one of the greatest return men in the history of UGA. You shouldn’t just ignore that. Even if he hasn’t practiced well.

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          • hailtogeorgia

            Agreed. Like I said, I would prefer to have McKenzie back there. The difference is I can see why in an isolated instance like this, Godwin got a couple of looks, and I don’t think it’s as asinine an idea as many.

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  27. CB

    I don’t now anything about practice, but McKenzie has fumbled punts during games right? I’m pretty sure he lost one during the Southern game, and off the top of my head I believe he’s fumbled a few other times. When he’s back deep I hold my breath until the punt is either downed or cleanly fielded.

    Like

    • So has Reggie Davis. Sony Michel fumbled a crucial kickoff against UT. Godwin hasn’t fumbled a punt, but he’s fumbled a catch.

      What’s your point?

      Like

      • CB

        My point is this post (unless I missed something) is criticizing Richt for not having McKenzie in the game based on practice, but it’s ignoring that he’s fumbled the ball in games as well. While I don’t disagree that McKenzie should be in the game, he has also made legitimate in-game mistakes that likely contribute to his absence as punt returner.

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        • Napoleon BonerFart

          Fumbles are costly. But McKenzie at least gives you the chance of a big return with that risk. As Bluto pointed out, all our return men have fumbled. But Richt still wants the chance of a big return. Otherwise, he’d have Ramsey fair catching everything.

          My problem is that Richt’s approach seems to be mitigating the reward, not the risk. High risk, high reward beats high risk, low reward any day.

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          • CB

            Agreed. I believe the thought process going in was that Godwin had yet to fumble a kick and also has some return ability. I understand where Richt’s head was and I don’t think him to be unwise in his decision making. McKenzie definitely gives you the best chance for a return though.

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