This is how plausible deniability works, y’all.

Jimbo Fisher said in deposition testimony that he was not aware of FSU’s policy about sexual battery.

Instead, he relied on procedure.

“I was to report to my superior,” Fisher said.
Boy, it’s a good thing head coaches aren’t known for being control freaks, right?  Um, wait…

22 Comments

Filed under ACC Football, Crime and Punishment

22 responses to “This is how plausible deniability works, y’all.

  1. SKB

    Maybe reporting to the superior IS their policy? Each school does it different so I wouldn’t be surprised.

    Like

  2. Gaskilldawg

    These guys know what is going on. Anyone think for a second that when Jimbo learned that his star QB recruit, the top HS QB in the country, could possibly be charged with a felony he just referred it to a superior and forgot about it? Lying bastard. That is just 1 reason I do not want him anywhere near the head coach’s office at my Alma Mater.
    Likewise, Rick Pitino had no clue an assistant coach was routinely having prostitutes at recruiting events on campus? Bullshit.

    Like

  3. Reipar

    I guess that is better than breaking out the you can’t handle the truth answer.

    Like

  4. Hogbody Spradlin

    Friend, you’re stretching the meaning of ‘plausible’.

    Like

  5. Rp

    He handled it correctly. We have learned at numerous other schools that coaches and administrators are not qualified to investigate and adjudicate reported felonies. He is there to coach football. The only entity that should be involved with these situations is local law enforcement.

    Like

    • Gaskilldawg

      Not debating that point. My point is that he is lying under oath if he claims that he did not make himself aware of what policy his star QB was facing.

      I did not say he should have been Jimbo Sherlock.

      Like

      • Rp

        My view on the college sexual assault issue in general is that the process is biased against the accused more often than not despite the fact the media and certain political factions swear we still live in the 1950’s. However, from what i have read about this case i agree with the comments below. It sounds like FSU is one of the remaining exceptions where they tried to ignore this and hoped it went away. Everyone needs to treat each story like this as an individual event and give both parties a fair shake.

        Like

  6. Macallanlover

    It is hard to imagine a major university, it’s athletic department, head coach, and city/campus police departments bungling a situation worse than happened in this case. Public sentiment will continue to roast all involved and Fisher’s handing of discipline during his time at FSU will stain his reputation forever. But that does not change the facts, at least those which have emerged, or been discussedreported, the decision to not charge Winston was the right one. The process sucked, the timing of handling the situation was awful, but there was no way a prosecutor should have ever taken that case to trial. Twelve honest people would not have gotten a unanimous, guilty verdict unless they got an “OJ jury” working more for a cause than administering justice. This whole incident seems to be more a case of the Gator aunt looking for a way to either further her reputation or cover for a case of “buyer’s remorse” to protect the niece.

    As for Fisher’s statement on what action he took initially, it seems consistent with how large corporations/institutions train employees on steps to handle a legal, or media, inquiry. My guess is Fisher did exactly what he was supposed to do by reporting it up the chain of command. I am as staunch a supporter as anyone on law enforcement issues and violence against any citizen, but it was more the process that was at fault here, not the administration of justice that was not served. It will only get uglier for FSU as the “cause” people will drive this bus now and the truth of this specific incident is not their primary objective.

    Like

    • Gaskilldawg

      I am not going to debate any of your points because that debate is not germine to the thread. My point is that I cannot believe he did not ask what policy would apply to his star QB so he would not be caught off guard by the direction of the inquiry.

      Does anybody other than a FSU Homer think that Jimbo reported it, and said, “Don’t tell me anything until it is all over”?

      When FSU staff talked about it in the football building did he put his fingers in his ears and chant, “NANANANANA” so he would not hear anything?

      Like

      • Macallanlover

        It is my take that Fisher is a mid-level manager in the FSU hierarchy and did what he was told to do, and likely did not understand the totality of the FSU policies. The discussions about strategy and what to say and do were most likely held outside his presence. In my experience, he would have gotten his marching orders from attorneys, executives, and PR people and probably followed them to a T. I have been critical of his handling of disciplinary actions in non-criminal. football related areas but if I were in charge of FSU, he would not have been talking without an adviser standing next to him and most of his comments would have been “no comment”, or a repetition of the recorded events as he knew them.

        Like

      • Otto

        The #@$%@ Germines got nothing to do with it!

        Like

      • Otto

        On a more serious not Jimbo on the surface does seem to be covering his rear, and is a win at all cost coach sort of like the last coach from a program in the state of Florida to win it all. Further I find it interesting the midget control freak running the top program in the SEC has not been linked to anything like this.

        Like

    • Tronan

      That’s a nice summary and interpretation, Mac. The whole affair makes me want to break out both eye and ear wash and then take a hot shower, but whatever case there was against Winston was not going to be a successful one to prosecute. And, as you note, reporting up the chain of the command is standard corporate M.O. It can be dissatisfying to observe, but it’s typically what large institutions insist employees follow.

      Like

      • Macallanlover

        Yes, the whole thing was sleazy. It would have been even if more immediate action were taken. The proper perspective needs to be on the whole issue of campus rape/violence and not just athletics. While we certainly assume there is favoritism shown to athletes, it doesn’t mean that every charge brought against one should be judged as having been swept under the rug. This is not all that different than the assumption of guilt/innocence because one is a national celebrity, or politically powerful. Winston is given special treatment in many ways because he is an athlete, he is also the target of some for the same reason.

        Regardless of what anyone assumes happened behind closed doors that night, FSU got a serious black eye, one that will last for many, many years. I think they deserved the cries of ineptness, but not so much the assumption of corruption. Campus rape, and violence in general, is increasing on college campuses nationally, FSU should not be singled out. The impression that universities have long covered up, and under reported, campus crimes has been around for decades. I don’t feel comfortable the the federal government’s involvement will help get the ship righted.

        Like

  7. Russ

    I feel slimy just reading about him.

    Like

  8. Isn’t that what JoePa said he did?

    Like

  9. JT (the other one)

    Well the Nazis claimed they were following orders…

    Like

  10. Uglydawg

    Here’s how it works. Jimbo reports it to his superior..the superior reports it his superior..who reports it to his superior until it gets to the big office in heaven. Theyr’e still waiting on an answer back. Until they get an email from theSupremeBeing@aol.com, everyone plays.

    Like

  11. Paul

    I work at a small college. I used to work at a midsize university. When it comes to federal rules and regulations, you know. Especially Title IX. You know. Everyone knows. It’s that simple. They tried the ‘I reported it to my superior’ defense at Penn State too. Didn’t turn out to well for them. However, FSU has always been extremely aggressive about their football players. And the local police are more than happy to accomodate them.

    Like

  12. Gene Simmons

    Here’s to all you supposed Dawg fans who think a Natty is the most important thing on the board. SO DID JIMBO.

    Like