You’ve made your bed. Now…

Will Leitch watches yesterday’s presser and nails the underlying message:

The move to fire Richt was, in this way, the precise reactionary one that Georgia has always claimed it wasn’t about. At a bizarre press conference on Monday morning, McGarity attempted to keep up the façade that Georgia remained the classy place you thought it was, heaping praise on the man he had just fired right as he sat next to him. He was able to bathe himself in the Christian good nature of Richt, who answered questions honestly but with no malice or anger toward the executioner a few feet away; Richt, by taking the high ground at every opportunity, allowed McGarity to believe he was somehow still doing things the Right Way, even as he evaded every question and refused to even give a reason for Richt’s dismissal.

Richt said he told his players that the way you feel and the way you act should be two different things, and he couldn’t have exemplified that any better in his press conference. McGarity tried to pretend he was somehow doing the right thing by Richt by standing beside him, that it meant Georgia football Stood For Something. But the only reason you felt that way was because of Richt.

With Richt gone, Georgia can no longer claim that it is any better, or different, than any other school that believes it should win a championship every year, that it will do anything in its power to get one as soon as possible, that cares more about expedience and emotion than prudence and patience. Now, it’s very possible, even likely, that Georgia shouldn’t have felt it was any different in the first place, that it was smug and self-aggrandizing to believe it wasn’t playing by the same rules everyone else was. Georgia is a big-time football program like the rest of them, and now it’s acting like one. “About time,” many will say. The illusion had to evaporate at some point.

I understand this. But then you can’t pretend, as McGarity tried to in the press conference, that things are the same as they ever were. They’re not. The central organizing principle of Georgia football, of this community, was that it was different here, that Richt was different, that this was all different. Now, no one can claim that, ever again.

The end result may be good.  It may not be good.  But it’s definitely going to be different, regardless of who they bring in.  Because he won’t be Mark Richt.

And the guy who has the most at stake in the new world is Greg McGarity.  Holding a joint press conference won’t change that.

224 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

224 responses to “You’ve made your bed. Now…

  1. Billy Mumphrey

    I have never called for anyone to be fired and would have been perfectly content for Richt to come back next year and beyond. But claiming this move is about wanting a title “every year” is utter bull shit. Richt had 15 years to win a national title and couldn’t get it done. Trying to paint Georgia in the same light as the Auburn’s of the world is preposterous.

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    • I don’t think Leitch is saying people expected Georgia to win a championship every year. I think he’s saying that the expectations themselves are annual in nature. Sure seems to be similar to what I’ve read in the comments section for some time now.

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      • gastr1

        “And then, Sunday, Georgia football announced that it wasn’t satisfied being Georgia football. It wanted to be Alabama football.”

        I was ready for Richt to move on, but I guess, like Billy, I too can see a distinction between wanting to compete for titles more often and being Alabama.

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        • He’s not the only one who thinks that way.

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          • Billy Mumphrey

            Weren’t all of the previous Bama coaches on staff hired by Mark Richt?

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            • gastr1

              I always read that Richt wanted to win as much as anyone, you know, when people said he was too soft, too Christian, or too gentlemanly to compete at the highest level. Pretty sure Richt said that too. I guess I wasn’t aware that the not trying too hard aspect of “the Georgia Way” was a feature, not a bug.

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          • Even is Saban himself comes to UGA, the BM Georgia Way will surely keep his winning percentage similar to Richt. BM folks are as delusional as Georgia fans. LOL.

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            • GaskillDawg

              Amen. Look at Saban’s record at Michigan State. He was an excellent coach there but but his results were not as good as other coaches.

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          • anon

            can they bring some of their players with them too

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        • Napoleon BonerFart

          That’s all well and good. The problem is, to get those titles, you have to compete with Alabama. Arguing that UGA should be able to compete with Alabama without adopting the mindset of Alabama is nonsensical. That’s like telling a 225 pound kid that he can be UGA’s next left tackle because he has more heart than those 300 pound monsters he would be competing against.

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          • Debby Balcer

            Indeed, what bothers me most about how this all went down is that we want the championship program but we don’t want to put the resources towards it. If Mark Richt had the support staff Saban had it would have been easier to get there. If we change nothing but our head coach we will still be operating at that same disadvantage. I felt in spite of the lack of support we were close and felt this recruiting class would even the odds. I wonder if those who personally wanted Richt gone and had the power felt the same and felt it they were going to get rid of him this is our only chance. I think we will take a step back because if they hire Smart he will have to learn the head coaching gig as well as rebuild. It is not an easy task.

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      • Billy Mumphrey

        “With Richt gone, Georgia can no longer claim that it is any better, or different, than any other school that believes it should win a championship every year, that it will do anything in its power to get one as soon as possible, that cares more about expedience and emotion than prudence and patience.”

        I must not be comprehending this sentence correctly.

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        • He obviously feels that the current image of Georgia’s Athletic Program is due to Richt’s image alone.

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          • gastr1

            Yeah. I was thinking that as well.

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          • GaskillDawg

            I did nt get that. I thought he was referring to the entire “Georgia Way” attitude. Example, McGarity cooperating with the AJ Green and Gurley investigations because that is the Georgia Way. Michael Adams broke his arm numerous times patting himself publicly on the back about how Georgia keeps sports in the proper perspective.

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          • C First

            No, it took him a lot of dedication, blood, sweat and total commitment
            to the athletes,team,UGA and doing it the right way. He brought class to UGA and its’ athletic program. As far as coaching he is a Winning coach. Just look at his record! We all lose in this decision to put GREED over an exemplary Athletic program based on skills,and preparing men who are equipped to contribute to society. Coach Richt is a winner no matter what because he gave 100%,he loved Georgia and he did it the right way.
            Ask any of his players.

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            • Debby Balcer

              +1 I am not worried about Coach Richt he is a winner he will land on his feet. The outpouring of support from players and colleagues shows that. I am worried about Georgia dawggrading itself.

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    • I feel that Richt was fired because the AD likes Richt to fire Pruit and he refused.

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  2. Mark

    Senator, don’t these last few days take the whole “student athlete” farce to a new level? If the football players really are meant to be students first, and athletes second, how in the world could any school justify firing someone like Coach Richt?

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    • Normaltown Mike

      so as long as a professor is nice to the students and tells them he loves them, we shouldn’t look at his performance?

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      • Charles

        Are you really that obtuse? It’s not a matter of whether Richt’s performance should be evaluated, but HOW it should be evaluated. That’s really what all of this pissing and moaning amongst the fan base has boiled down to anyway.

        BELK BOWL, Y’ALL!!! doesn’t capture the entire picture.

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      • Gaskilldawg

        Of course not. But in this case the performance was at a better level than any other professor in the school’s history.
        I understand that you wanted him gone and the reasons why. I do and respect that. Richt is gone and is not coming back.
        The point is that this move demands a culture change. If winning at a Saban or Meyer level is the goal then t can only happen if we change our culture to the culture that allows Saban and Meyer to thrive.
        I was going to quote Boardwalk Empire’s Jimmy Dormany, “You can’t be half a gangster, Nuck.” (Guess I did anyway). I understand how you may find that quote unfair because Saban and Meyer are not criminals. The underlying point of the quote is that we cannot undertake a goal without committing to do the dirty work.

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        • Normaltown Mike

          I wanted CMR to retire, never wanted him fired.

          The wailing and gnashing of teeth for a guy in his 15th season is beyond ridiculous. We’ve been average as grits for three straight seasons in a mediocre division and our GREATEST seasons over the last decade include brain farts like SCe and UT in 2007 and getting curb stomped by SCe in 2012.

          I’m glad we have many fans that gloss over under-performing. I’m not going to pretend it was anything other than that.

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          • Athens Townie

            Fair points. Many seem tempted to revise history right now.

            Richt did great things for Georgia. He earned a lot of goodwill.

            He also failed to stay on top of his own program and keep up with the SEC. That’s why he lost his job — not because he didn’t win a national championship.

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            • HirsuiteDawg

              compare his record to the SEC – HOther than Alabama he has competed at as high a level as anyone.

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              • gastr1

                Yes. Except that UF, AU, and LSU each have played for or won multiple national titles. That’s why, IMO, it is not preferable to win 10 games every year if it means never being in a BCS bowl, having a shot at an NC, winning the SEC, or making the playoff. I would take those latter things if it meant going 6-6 one or two of those years we won nine or ten games–like this one.

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          • GaskillDawg

            Whether you wanted him fired, retained or to fall on his own sword is irrelevant. Richt is gone and is not returning.
            My point is about how we approach the future, not how we evaluate the past. The institutional lip service may still be “The Georgia Way” but the Alabamas and Auburns and Ole Misses are in the way of our goals, and to beat them we have to adapt to their culture. We can’t expect them to change to the Georgia Way.

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          • Napoleon BonerFart

            Given that Saban has only had one undefeated season at Alabama, and that Bama fans revere him, do you think Bama fans are too willing to gloss over Saban’s losses to inferior teams?

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        • Meyer (with Huntley Johnson’s help) did enable criminals …

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      • Mark

        Does UGA exists to educate students or to only win football games? If it is to educate students and help them become productive members of society, then that should carry the most weight when grading teachers, professors, coaches, etc. If winning is what matters most, then lets drop the whole student facade and pay the students for the job they are doing and hold the coaches accountable for winning more than the way they win.

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        • Normaltown Mike

          The majority of our football players would not be admitted to UGA, were it not for football.

          I guess you attended UGA in the 30’s, but that’s been the deal since Wally Butts came on.

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          • GaskillDawg

            Whether the football players would have be denied admission or not, once they are in school should the university’s mission be to educate them and help them become productive members of society?

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            • S

              There is an incredible academic infrastructure that surrounds the players. They have their own academic building – the Rankin Smith building – with the very best learning technology, and professional, vetted tutors in any topic you can think of. It’s for all the athletes, not just football, and it’s something that’s independent of any of the coaches.

              I was one of their tutors for a semester when I was a grad student at UGA and on a per-hour basis it paid a good deal better than my assistantship. Unfortunately, the topic was in very low demand. But anyhow, they get a massive amount of help. Any student-athlete who doesn’t pass and do fairly well in academics at UGA simply is not trying.

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        • dawgtired

          Not advocating the CMR firing but…can’t we have both? I realize that we may have missed out on some great players because of strict ethics but I believe it is possible to win championships with the talent we have had.

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  3. 81Dog

    I hope all the demanding excellence people are happy, happy, happy now.

    This is a no class move, precisely because it means that all the things so many people claim makes UGA better than Auburn, Tennessee, Ole Miss, etc don’t really mean a thing. All that matters is “winning” and it doesn’t matter if you do it all by the book, in a classy way, if you don’t have the NC ring.

    what I care about or want doesn’t matter, but if we have tp be exactly like Auburn or Tennessee or any of the shady programs so many of the excellence demanders have sneered at as we beat the brakes off them, then count me out.

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    • Normaltown Mike

      will you mail me your commemorative Belk Bowl Champions t-shirt?

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    • No One Knows You're a Dawg

      This “higher standard” Georgia has held itself to for decades now has been nothing more than a successful misdirection by those in charge to justify the chronic underperformance of our athletic teams. We’ve been told, and in large part believe, that the reason we haven’t been more successful is because we’re not willing to risk the school’s reputation by engaging in shady behavior.

      But what has this higher standard actually gotten us in terms of reputation? Is Georgia thought of as some guardian of integrity holding itself to a higher standard in the ethics? No. If you go ask someone in California or Conneticut or Montana about the integrity of Georgia athletics, he’ll respond by lumping us in with the Alabamas and Auburns of the world-just another football factory school with a bunch of dope-smoking criminal players. Meanwhile, schools such as Michigan, North Carolina and Vanderbilt enjoy much better reputations than Georgia, despite engaging in behaviors that make Georgia’s “scandals” look tame in comparison. So not only are we not thought of as having higher standards, but places with worse behavior are perceived as being better.

      What’s worse, the negative impression nationally of our program and our student-athletes has largely been reinforced by the higher-standard policies of Georgia administrators and endorsed by “integrity-first” Georgia fans. But where’s the “integrity” in a willingness to throw student-athletes under the bus to make administrators look virtuous and give fans a sense of moral superiority?

      Fans should realize that they’ve been sold a myth, a myth created to justify mediocrity, a myth that harms the reputation of both the University of Georgia and the student-athletes who play for it, a myth which only they, and no one else, believe in.

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      • GaskillDawg

        Fine. Let’s reject what you call the myth and make beating Alabama and Auburn and Ole Miss at their games our policy going forward. Take the Auburn approach to giving thieves second and third chances. Let’s change our asinine alcohol and drug suspension policy. Let the coach determine when to drug tests. Let’s fire Williamson and replace him with someone who understands the support role the campus police should have. Let’s make sure local car dealers and local haberdashers know what is expected of them without either side verbalizing it.

        The most stupid thing is to send the next guy out to win NCs without being willing to do what it takes to beat them at their game.

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      • Napoleon BonerFart

        The higher standard of UGA isn’t a myth. We have the strictest drug policy of any team in the SEC. We have campus police on a mission to punish athletes for the slightest of transgressions. Those are facts.

        True, people ignorant of college athletics may not know about UGA’s policies. That’s no reason to change them. Should our school teachers try to teach Georgia kids to speak with a New York accent, so that they sound more intelligent to northerners? No.

        Now, do the suits at B-M hold themselves in higher esteem than the kids who make their jobs possible? Absolutely. And many of them probably even believe in the elitist propaganda that they spout justifying why paying poor kids who do dangerous work is un-American.

        What the administration, and fans, must now accept, is what the Georgia Way means. It means that UGA will be a very good program that will usually come up short against programs like Alabama. If you want to beat Alabama, you can’t handicap yourself. You have to adopt the Alabama Way.

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    • GaskillDawg

      Great post.

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    • dawgtired

      81, I’m a fan of Richt but I don’t think they fired him because he wasn’t “dirty” enough to win championships. I believe that the admin really believe someone can play to the beat of their drum and still win…Championships.

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  4. With Richt gone, Georgia can no longer claim that it is any better, or different, than any other school that believes it should win a championship every year, that it will do anything in its power to get one as soon as possible, that cares more about expedience and emotion than prudence and patience.

    I disagree with this characterization. It ignores the fact that the admin stuck with Richt through the 2009/2010 downturn, when by far the majority of programs he’s referencing there would likely have made a change. You can argue that Richt wasn’t given all resources that he possibly could have been given, but the one thing he WAS given was time.

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    • It’s not 2009 anymore, Rev.

      And my bet is that if the team hadn’t shown improvement in 2011, we wouldn’t be having this discussion now.

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      • Agreed, but if that 2009/2010 dip had never happened, then Richt is probably (obviously can’t say for sure) still employed today. Richt used up pretty much all the good will he had built up during that time, barely had enough to hang on. And just wasn’t able to build up enough again. I mean even the best season that he had since then (2012) had a very embarrassing blowout loss. He just wasn’t able to fill that “goodwill” tank again. But the fact that he was given as much time as he was counts for something. Auburn fired their coach 2 years after winning a national title. We waited 10 years after just the last conference title to fire ours. Throwing us in the same category just isn’t a fair characterization.

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        • The difference is that Auburn’s never tried to cloak itself in the same things we’ve been happy to.

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          • And I’m not saying there isn’t a point to be made there.

            But again, referring to my last point, look at how much longer it took us to pull the trigger on a conference winning coach than it did for Auburn to pull the trigger on a national championship winning coach. Actions speak louder than words. That’s a clear difference between the two, and justifies – to an extent – feeling that we operate differently – because we did operate differently.

            Like I said, there’s a point to be made there, that at the end of the day, everyone wants to win. And I’m not McG apologist or B-M apologist, I hope it’s not coming across that way. But they have conducted themselves, over time, differently than the AU’s and TN’s of the world. So I stand by the fact that lumping us all in the same category just doesn’t hold water.

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            • piper

              auburn’s players QUIT on gene chizik. they had no choice. our players never quit on coach richt. ever.

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            • 69Dawg

              Yes they have and sometimes it has been not so good for the team or school. McG is Adam’s guy and he still is acting like it. If it takes our version of Derek Dooley to clean out Buttsmear then so be it.

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          • Scorpio Jones, III

            Oh they have tried, them Awbuns, we just don’t believe them. 😀

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          • S

            Senator, I hate to disagree with you, but I was both a graduate teaching assistant and a tutor for the AD while a PhD student at UGA. I can tell you that there was a great deal of attention paid to student-athlete attendance and performance in classes. I got sent all kinds of emails and forms asking for progress reports on athletes. At academic conferences, I met students from other institutions, including Auburn, and what I got from the Auburn contingent was laughter at how things were done and that they felt like whatever grade they turned in would come out the way that the coaches wanted. I can guarantee you that if I’d had to flunk a Georgia athlete, he/she would have stayed flunked. So, from direct experience, I can tell you that the things we “cloak” ourselves in as opposed to Auburn, well, there’s an actual difference.

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        • Atticus

          Shoot if he just recruits a decent QB after Murray he would still have a job.

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          • He recruited three Elite 11 guys after Murray (LeMay, Ramsey, Park). If you want to take a shot at development, that’s another story. Bauta was the only recruit that wasn’t “blue chip.” Recruiting wasn’t the problem.

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    • Rp

      This is one of those stupid “all or nothing” articles. Georgia has not even hired the new coach yet and Leitch can confidently say they are now win at all costs because they have fired one coach in 15 years. If we hire Petrino next week this article will be warranted, but lets just slow down in the mean time.

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      • What are the odds that Georgia’s next head coach lasts 15 years in Athens?

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      • Tronan

        This article annoys me. Smart could well be an upright guy, similar to Richt. In fact, I assume he is, otherwise he wouldn’t be under consideration (or would have coached under Richt). Even if he’s just a typical coach for whom expedience rules the day, that doesn’t mean we’re going to become Auburn east.

        And, I don’t know what this “believes it should win a championship every year” crap is, either. Everyone I know personally understands that’s unrealistic. UGA should be in the running more years than not – and as a result, win its fair share of SEC championships (and, by extension, be in the national title picture). What I think disappoints even the most avid Richt backers is that we haven’t even been in the running very often over the past decade.

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        • Tronan

          But, yeah, McG’s a yutz and that presser was weird.

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        • Debby Balcer

          The next coach is not what the issue is it is the changing culture of the boosters and administration that is the issue. Even Saban and Dank addressed that after the firing. It is the what have you done lately for me attitude with what have you done being raised to the height of have you gotten me to th NC.

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        • "the" ChilliDawg

          You can were in the running. You just needed a loss by Mo or Fl to get there. And you were last there in 2012, just 5 yards short.

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    • Jeff

      Time doesn’t mean squat without the resources, and once they gave him the resources, they didn’t give him any time. One recruiting class after the big “commitment”, out of which he played 22 freshmen or some such, with a monster class coming in (the likes of which UGA has NEVER seen before), and they fire him. Like someone else here said, he’s gone and he’s not coming back. What a shame. And of course, Richt will be fine and his reputation and aura will only grow from this. UGA’s on the other hand, well……

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      • bad byron

        Well stated. He put up with the cheap ass Ga Way forever, and when BM finally figured it out and arrived at the 21st century, they grew short on patience. I was as tired of the WTF games as anybody, but it was stupid and short sighted to not give CMR one more year.

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  5. Uglydawg

    As much as I agree with this, I also know that nothing lasts forever..and sooner or later this was coming.
    But the way it’s been handled is just …shitty.
    So far, unless there is something we on the outside can’t see, something that is going to cause all of us to say, “McGarity had it all right all along”, I have to say this looks like a disaster.

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  6. JAX

    Good grief, what an overreaction. I am saddened that Mark Richt didn’t win more games, big games, and more titles. No coach in the history of college football deserved it more. But if the characteristics that make him an outstanding individual equated to winning ballgames then the entire discussion is moot, although it isn’t because in the end this is a results-driven business and we were not competing at a level that we needed to be.

    That is it, simple, not hard, got it??

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    • Nobody is arguing with that. Indeed, all Will is saying is that the administration has quit trying to pretend otherwise. Hard to see how that’s an overreaction.

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      • Biggus Rickus

        I think he takes the argument too far, myself. It’s one thing to acknowledge that winning matters more than the other stuff, ultimately. It’s another to jump to the idea that Georgia is Tennessee is Auburn. There are lines some programs won’t cross and others will.

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        • Don’t speak so soon. We don’t know who the new coach is yet. The rumored top candidate spent years under Saban, who learned under Belichick, who is the best coach in history at finding and exploiting loopholes and grey areas. You can’t tell me that Saban isn’t also good at those things. It is a stretch to think that Smart wouldn’t be too.

          I agree that a line has been crossed…and now that it has, the next coach had better be markedly more successful than Richt at winning football games–because you can’t say any of that other shit matters now.

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          • Biggus Rickus

            You can still say it matters. It does matter. It doesn’t supersede winning at an acceptable level (however each of us defines that) though.

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            • GaskillDawg

              Sure we can SAY it matters, and I bet we will. Problem is that no one will believe us when we say it.

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            • Napoleon BonerFart

              If wins matter more than graduation rates, arrests, bad press, and fundraising, which we all seem to acknowledging is the unstated message out of B-M, then we’re just arguing about distinctions without differences.

              On a scale of importance from 1-10, if wins are a 9, does it really matter if marijuana usage is a 1 or a 3? I think not.

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      • JAX

        This is simply a final nail on the coffin of the Mike Adams school of façade enhancement. He wanted UGA to be Virginia, which is great, but at our core we are them and they are not us. Adams never said that successful athletics and academics are mutually exclusive, but he tried to make it seem that we don’t care as much about football championships because that’s what made us a better institution than say, Bama. However Florida proved his theory wrong a long time ago which is why I have/had high hopes and expectations for McGarity. I suppose those hopes remain to be seen or realized.

        So in the end we are back to being honest with ourselves and not trying to be something we are not. Just say you want to be the best and make it happen, and stop wasting time pretending. Fred Davison would say “about damn time!”.

        If that is what Will is trying to say in his “you mean Santa isn’t real!!” commentary then sure, I get it.

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      • 1) I have always felt it was a laughable conceit that Georgia was “different.” In some ways, sure. But overall, nope. It is one of many huge, very wealthy state universities with fans and alumni who want certain things to happen so they can stay connected to their alma mater.

        2) That said, you can’t deny that Georgia was far more patient with Richt than pretty much any other school of comparable size/history/revenue.

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      • Agree with that, just quit pretending and admit it is big business and UGA is like everyone else. Win SEC, win NC, just win and win big. We will sell our soul to win a NC. I am neither a Richt supporter or hater.

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  7. Scorpio Jones, III

    Excuse me, but fuck Greg McGarity’s neck being stuck out, Bluto, he’s hired help…. I, we, you, us are the people with the most to lose in this situation, not Greg McGarity or Mark Richt. US!!!!

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    • kevinsauer

      so you, personally, are gonna get fired if the next UGA coach doesn’t pan out?

      it’s just a game, dog.

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    • Scorp, as long as the next man in doesn’t do anything to cheapen my degree (thanks, Michael Adams and Jim Harrick!), I’m not sure I have anything to lose here.

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      • Scorpio Jones, III

        So the idea of wandering in the Tennessee wilderness for 10 years on the football field and winding up with a Butch Jones does not give you pause?

        Gosh and golly, I guess I take Georgia football way too seriously.

        Maybe Kevin is right, its just a game.

        You may not have anything to lose if the next coach is a fuckup, Bluto, but I sure as hell do. And so do we all.

        Hell, boss, this morning all of us, even your esteemed self are reduced to the most delusional of all human things…hope.

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        • Bro Tereshinski III

          I’m with the Senator on this one, unless the new coach does something to sully the value of a UGA degree, then I don’t really lose.

          If our football team pulls a Tennessee, I guess it means I have to deal with more guff from my UF and Tech co-workers and friends, but that’s about the only real annoyance a bad football team will bring to my life.

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          • Scorpio Jones, III

            Bro, I am glad you are able to intellectualize your relationship to Georgia football, there. Is there a book I can read? 🙂

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          • Jeff

            So losing more means a little annoyance, but having a small chance to win more more meant enough to fire Mark Richt? Geez people. Apparently, people’s livelihoods are just a game too, as are the fans’ attachments to the coach and the relationships of the players with the staff, who represent father figures to a lot of these kids. Something’s not squaring up here.

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          • GaskillDawg

            I totally respect your point of view and do not argue with it. A bunch of losing seasons will affect me because I make contributions and buy season tickets and take the effort o go to the games. Paying the money and making the effort to attend makes the losses worse than they are when I just watch the game on television.

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      • 81Dog

        I dont see how what anyone at UGA does today cheapens or adds value to a degree someone received 35 (or how ever many, not just you personally) years ago. Are people really so dense that they think “Hmmm. UGA grads have x scores on the SAT in 2015, so that guy who got in back in 1977 when you basically had to make 800 and have a checkbook with a positive balance must be a lot smarter than I thought?” Feel free to insert the pre-2015 year of your choice for “1977′” because it’s the same premise.

        Mike Adams BS claim to “add value” to UGA degrees from 10, 20, 30 years ago is laughable. There were smart people there in 1970. A lot of them are running this state now. There are dumb people there now, apparently many of whom work in the athletic department.

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        • The entrance requirements did increase dramatically during Adams’ tenure. Though this is a function of the Hope Scholarship more than anything Michael Adams did. Adams just hit the lottery…literally.

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        • Bro Tereshinski III

          I don’t think that one’s alma mater having an upstanding football coach makes one look smarter. After all, people still think highly of a UF degree despite all the shenanigans Corch allowed.

          I do think, however, that negative press coverage of one’s alma mater can make it a heck of a lot more embarrassing to say “yeah, I went to _____.”

          I would argue that Jameis Winston devalued Florida State’s “brand,” but they didn’t have much of an academic brand to begin with. I do know that when I’ve come across Penn State grads, I’m prone to give a little side eye. Long argument short, I don’t want a coach who is going to do things (like allegedly help cover up a rape, cough James Franklin, cough cough) that will embarrass UGA. I don’t want UGA to become a place with a football-above-all culture that provides the football team with cover for their bad actions (see, Lizzie Seeburg, Jerry Sandusky, Jameis Winston, etc.). Those things make it embarrassing to hold a UGA diploma. I can live with a bad football team run by good people. I cannot abide a good football team run by bad people.

          Like

      • Good comment on the degree. Cheapen or not? That is a very good question.

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  8. sectionzalum

    the two most apt quotes i’ve seen about this squalid, self-inflicted embarrassment:

    “With Richt gone, Georgia can no longer claim that it is any better, or different, than any other school that believes it should win a championship every year, that it will do anything in its power to get one as soon as possible, that cares more about expedience and emotion than prudence and patience.”

    “But then you can’t pretend, as McGarity tried to in the press conference, that things are the same as they ever were. They’re not. The central organizing principle of Georgia football, of this community, was that it was different here, that Richt was different, that this was all different. Now, no one can claim that, ever again.”

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    • I’m not struggling with the decision to remove CMR anymore. He’s going to be fine and apparently is now the hot commodity on the market just as I thought at the end of October. If he wants to coach this year or next, he’s going to be able to pick the job he wants. Good for him.

      What I am struggling with is this rush to hire a guy who has zero head coaching experience just because he is a coordinator at Alabama and is a Georgia man (by the way, I don’t consider he or Muschamp Georgia men anymore). This hire isn’t the home run hire that Meyer was to Florida or OSU or Saban was to Alabama. This hire feels like Mike Shula all over again because he was a coordinator and am Alabama man. I don’t understand why we didn’t swing for the fences and try to hire a PROVEN head coach if you’re going to run off a PROVEN head coach.

      Rant over. I needed to get that off my chest. I’ll hang up and listen 😉

      Like

      • paul

        These are my thoughts as well. Our plan A seems somewhat underwhelming. And if we have a plan B we haven’t let that cat out of the bag yet. Perhaps that’s when we hire a search firm ‘in some capacity?’

        Like

        • Paul, I don’t understand why Plan A appears to be a downgrade from the previous guy. If I looked at his resume, I would say, “Go find a job like Meyer, Bobo, McElwain, Herman, Sumlin, Strong, Fedora, etc. did and prove yourself. Call me back in 3-5 years when you’re ready and we’ll talk if we need to make a change.” If you have the best job available (which we do now that USCw decided to retain Helton), why not attempt to upgrade to a Shaw, a Kelly (if he’s out in Philly), or someone proven?

          Like

          • Exactly. I would take Bobo over Smart all day long. I bet you could do that relatively cheap and keep most of the rest of the staff in place too.

            You know McGarity’s Plan A is probably Mullen.

            If it is Smart, I think it makes Georgia look very, very small to fire a 15 year HC, just because lowly SC might hire a DC from Bama that happened to go to UGA 25 years ago AND that jilted UGA when we wanted him back once before. Shouldn’t UGA be making decisions based on UGA and not what SC may or may not do?

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            • Biggus Rickus

              Well, if there’s anyone who could unite the fanbase, it’s Mike Bobo.

              Like

              • You say that like some candidate will. That doesn’t exist. But Bobo is more of a UGA guy than Smart is. Not sure why the guy with zero HC experience is somehow valued higher than the guy with 1.

                Regardless–to half the fanbase, whoever is hired will only ever be not-Richt.

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              • dudemankind

                That was a quality snark right there. Well done! If someone had suggested Mike Bobo for head coach on here 3 years ago they would have been laughed off the message board. Half of the Georgia fans I encounter and strike up conversation with still hate that guy, whether he deserves it or not.

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          • paul

            Actually I was agreeing with you. I too believe we should be looking for a proven head coach. You don’t fire a guy who routinely wins 9-10 games a year to replace him with an unknown commodity. Smart has proven to be a top notch coordinator. But plenty of top notch coordinators have failed miserably as head coaches. My assumption here is that Kirby is our Plan A.

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          • Napoleon BonerFart

            Unless the Georgia Way has been abandoned, UGA won’t touch Kelly with his history of NCAA violations. And Shaw is in a pretty good situation with a chance to win a P5 conference, get into the playoff, and not have to contend with Saban.

            Like

            • I understand, so we’re going to give the keys to a guy who hasn’t proven anything other he can do what Saban tells him to do. The point is why aren’t we going after a big name that says, “Damn, Georgia is serious about competing with the Tide.”? The current Plan A doesn’t say we’re serious … it says “We just want something different.”

              It goes back to what I posted yesterday. The question will be “If Georgia is the best opening out there, why in the hell is this person the best qualified for the job?”

              Like

    • Normaltown Mike

      +1

      In galapagos tortoise years, CMR was barely getting started at year 15. UGA totally quit on him too early.

      Like

  9. B

    I believe the thought that Georgia did it better was in a lot of ways brought to bear because Richt couldn’t win a championship. When we don’t win the east, we’ll its because we don’t cut corners or but look at what a great man our head coach is. After so many ‘wati til next years’ you have to hang your hat on something.

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  10. Will Leitch needs to temper it down. He’s showing his “reactionary” side.
    I for one am happy to see that UGA can make such a big change in the football program in such a respectful , encouraging and harmonious spirit.
    And yes, that is mostly due to Mark RIcht’s wonderful character and attitude.
    But it doesn’t make McGarrity an “executioner”. And he should not be expected to spell out all of CMR’s shortcomings at their joint presser. It wasn’t the time for it. This presser was about a smooth transition.

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    • I would love for CMR to spell out GM’s shortcomings when the time is right because I guarantee you GM will to Mark Bradley over the next month. There’s plenty of time for that as well, but, alas, he’s a man of class and character.

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  11. DawgPhan

    So hard the lulz….so many fans wanting to have that cake and eat it too. They loved wrapping up in the Georgia Way cape to look down their nose at their AU friends, but damn if they were lusting after their glass footballs under that cloak.

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  12. Buz

    The fact is – College football is no longer about college, no longer about students and is really about money. I’m actually surprised we still have student tickets and a student section.Time and again we have seen that coaches and athletes can play by different rules than the rest of us – as long a they win.
    Mark Richt was one of the few hold-outs that felt that raising good men was as important as winning. I felt that that really helped us in recruiting and although we won our fair share of Fulmer Cups, we could sell one of the cleanest programs in the nation. One that didn’t make false promises to athletes and held them to standards off of the field and one they and their parents could be proud to be associated with.
    Sure Alabama, Auburn, FSU and Ohio State have won National Championships in the last six years. I’m not sure I would trade my last 6 years as a UGA with any of them any more than I would have wanted to be a Miami fan in the 80s or early 90s. I’d just feel dirty, but I guess that’s just me.

    I guess it’s time to accept the fact that times have changed and winning is everything.

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  13. sUGArdaddy

    I think we live in a culture that is looking for something to upset about. I’m an old dawg that watched Dooley, Goff and Donnan, too. I’m also an evangelical Christian that adored the character and faith of Mark Richt. I don’t understand why people HAVE to see all the issues as so polarizing:

    -There are plenty of great men and women of character and Christian faith who lose their jobs every day because the results they produce in the marketplace are not satisfactory. There are many good pastors who are fine Christians who are dismissed from a church because it hasn’t grown under their leadership. The idea that we should keep people simply because they are fine individuals is not true in any profession, even the church.

    -It is, first and foremost, about winning. And representing the university. And graduating players. And influencing young men. Mark Richt got to stay for so long because he won A LOT. In the end, it wasn’t enough. Whatever else coaching big-time college football is about, it follows a big AND after winning.

    -What Dawg fan in their right mind thinks that Mark Richt is the only one who ‘does it right’ or is the reason we ‘do it right’? Yes, he helped tremendously. He carries himself in a way that is different than all the others. I’m proud of that. But Dooley was committed to doing things different than Dye at Auburn and Hall at Florida. They ended up on probation banned from bowls. We never did, even with the Kemp fiasco. We did things different than Fulmer at UT. We never had a coach subpoenaed. We’ll continue to be different because that’s the Georgia Way, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t try and compete for championships every year, and it doesn’t mean we can do what we do better.

    Mark Richt is a fine man and I’d want him influencing my sons any day of the week and twice on Sundays. But the last two years in Jacksonville doomed him. I would have been fine, and even wanted him to stay, to have him around to give it one more try with Eason and a healthy Chubb. Nevertheless, I see the logic of letting him go. Maybe he refused to fire Schotty. Maybe he didn’t have the answers. Or maybe the evidence of a team that lacked focus an intensity nearly all year was enough for the powers that be. It was not a fun season. Nothing about it was fun. Beating Auburn and Tech were great, but the games weren’t fun because we weren’t a fun team.

    Donnan’s last 3 regular seasons were 8-3, 7-4, 7-4. Richt’s last 3 season’s were 8-4, 9-3, 9-3. One loss difference. No one minded Donnan getting the can because he was bristly. Mark is a fine man, and it bothers us that 9 wins isn’t enough. Saban asked “What happens to me when I lose 3?” I don’t know, Nick, you’ve only done it once, in 2010. You followed that up with 2 straight National Championships. It’s not losing 3. The next guy will, too, and probably at a rate more frequent than Saban. But, we’ve got to have those 10 and 11 win regular seasons to get a shot at the SEC and the playoff, and there just haven’t been enough of those. Since 2008, Saban has lost 3 one time. Since 2008, we’ve lost 3 seven times. And, unfortunately, that’s the standard in this league. And we CAN catch them. There’s no reason we can’t.

    There was a time that I didn’t think USC would ever lose the Pac-10 again. And Oregon decided to do something about it. TCU and Baylor decided to do something about OU always winning the Big 12. Bama decided to something about losing 6 straight to Auburn.

    So just relax everyone. Richt is an awesome person and was a fine coach. Maybe we can be even better without him. Maybe we won’t. But none of us know. You can be proud of his wonderful accomplishments on the field and off the field AND still wish we could win a few more and still do it with class.

    Like

    • Biggus Rickus

      Good post.

      Like

    • … But Dooley was committed to doing things different than Dye at Auburn and Hall at Florida. They ended up on probation banned from bowls. We never did, even with the Kemp fiasco

      Come on, man. That’s a nice line you’ve drawn, but punishment’s punishment.

      Like

      • sUGArdaddy

        I am mindful of the cover of US News…”What price Glory?” But, we didn’t get put on bowl probation, and that was in an era that the NCAA was handing out that kind of probation like free candy.

        It must be said, though, that our most cherished memories on the gridiron are shrouded in the Kemp scandal and the Butts/Bryant scandal. Does that mean it’s incredibly hard to win the right way? I don’t know. I do think you have to push the edges of the envelope. I don’t think Bama cheats (they don’t need to). I do think they push the edges as far as they can.

        But there’s always been an air at UGA about trying to do things right, and I don’t think that’s going to change. That’s my point. We might not have a man of Richt’s caliber on the sidelines, but he upped the ante on who I think we’ve tried to be. That’s why it seemed like such a good fit. But winning championships is ultimately the fit they’re looking for, and it doesn’t seem to be that they thought he could anymore.

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        • I am mindful of the cover of US News…”What price Glory?” But, we didn’t get put on bowl probation, and that was in an era that the NCAA was handing out that kind of probation like free candy.

          That was because Dooley was good working the NCAA on that stuff.

          And, again, Will’s point isn’t that Georgia’s now committed to cheating. He’s just saying that the administration is finally admitting that winning is more important than all the niceties we used to pride ourselves on.

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          • Scorpio Jones, III

            And maybe all those niceties we used to pride ourselves on were a convenient sop when we did not pay the price to win enough….the very essence of the Georgia Way?

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          • S

            “That was because Dooley was good working the NCAA on that stuff.”

            Oh now, I’m not sure about that one. Dooley was involved along with Oklahoma in the lawsuit that broke open the NCAA’s TV monopoly in 1984. Think they ever forgave Dooley or Georgia for that one?

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        • Scorpio Jones, III

          Sugar I gotta tell you, I think, compared to our dust up over Jan Kemp, that Auburn got off easy.

          In a sense, what is going on right now is a continuation of our punishment.

          As was Michael Adams.

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      • 81Dog

        someone remind me again how many NCs Dooley won. And how many he won without the greatest player in the history of college football.

        To cite Dooley’s accomplishments as a reason in support of firing Richt is pretty hilarious. If the internet existed in the fall of 1974, or the fall of 1977, I’m not even sure Dooley would have been around for the early 80s. Dooley had a lot more average years, and non championship years, than some people seem to want to recall. I was and remain a Dooley fan, but except for the Herschel years, UGA was never a “dominant” program under him. We were pretty good most years, average some years, mediocre a few times. He’d never last 25 years with today’s know it all crowd.

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        • Biggus Rickus

          As I pointed out in another thread, Dooley would have made every SEC Championship Game from ’75 to ’83, with the exception of ’77, if they existed back then. ’74 was a year that could have seen Dooley fired, but Richt survived ’10, so I doubt it.

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          • GaskillDawg

            Another perspective is that through his first 15 years Dooley gets credit for an SEC championship in 1966, 1968 and 1976. Unlike today, the 1966 championship was a co-championship with Alabama, and the 1976 championship was a co-championship with Kentucky. How do we compare or contrast co-championships back then with today, when there cannot be a co-champion. Do we treat a co-championship as the equivalent of making the SEC CG? However we do it, Dooley had 1 outright championship to Richt’s two. Richt was a Eastern Division co-champion in 2004. How do we factor that into comparisons. The 1975-1983 Dooley teams played 6 conference games a year instead of 8, and half of our conference slate was Vandy, Kentucky and Ole Miss during its post-integration down years. It makes hard comparisons about what Dooley would have done in today’s climate or what Richt would have done from 1975-1983 more difficult. Both were very good coaches and I am glad we had both.

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            • Biggus Rickus

              ’76 wasn’t shared. Georgia was 5-1. Nobody else was better than 5-2. The ’81 title was shared with Alabama though. It’s difficult to compare coaches from different eras. So much has changed over the years. I think it’s a little easier to win at Georgia now than it was before desegregation and the southern population boom, but you still have to be a good coach to do it. Of course, those factors have also improved the overall quality of the SEC, so maybe it’s a wash. That said, Georgia was the second best program in the SEC in the second half of the ’70s, and the best program in the first half of the ’80s. It is to date, the longest run of sustained success in the program’s history.

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        • Biggus Rickus

          Also, if you think the ’90s were bad, go back and look at the ’50s and early ’60s. That would give you some perspective on exactly why Dooley is so honored by Georgia fans even though he wasn’t Bear Bryant.

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          • GaskillDawg

            Dooley deserves a hell of a lot of credit. Most of the folks who [post on this blog are unaware of the state of the program in 1964. We had to play doubleheaders at Grant Field to make ends meet, for pete’s sake.

            In fact, a little known Georgia football history fact, Wally Butts coached the Bulldogs in games away from Athens than he coached in Sanford Stadium One year we had just 3 home games.

            After Dooley arrived we no longer had to schedule games away from Athens for any reason other than home and home series.

            Like

    • charlottedawg

      This. Well stated.

      Like

    • dubyadee

      “It is, first and foremost, about winning. And representing the university. And graduating players. And influencing young men.”

      If you can spot the technical error in these phrases, you’ll also spot the logical error in the post.

      Like

      • Biggus Rickus

        Insert a then. You know what he meant.

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        • BulldogBen

          I’m with the Rev. The “niceties” that Richt brought were simply sanctified losing. It allowed fans to justify going to the Belk Bowl because, you know, we suspend players and hold ourselves to some perceived standard and to take shots at programs like FSU………”you’ve got a title, but at least we aren’t CHEATS!”. I’m not saying we go full Jackie Sherrill but Bama not only spends the most money, but they also push at the edge of everything for a competitive advantage within the rules. All the extra assistants and coaches on the sidelines, recruiting “specialists”, engaging in greyshirting (no matter your feeling on it, at the time, there were no rules against it), etc, etc, etc.

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  14. West coast dog

    Sorry, I too have to call BS on this. Richt is not the only way to have a clean program that cares about doing things the right way. that is self righteous BS. See Stanford as an example to aspire to for example.

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    • Stanford alumni (and I don’t think there are Stanford fans who couldn’t find Palo Alto on a map) don’t have the expectation of winning the national championship in football. They want a man who is going to be competitive, do it the right way, and not do anything to affect the Stanford brand – that sounds a lot like the positive side of the Georgia Way. Unless David Shaw starts losing 5-7 games per year, they won’t run him out of Palo Alto because Stanford knows what sucking at football really looks like.

      Like

      • Dog in Fla

        “not do anything to affect the Stanford brand”

        As if Condi Rice and Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace
        haven’t affected the Stanford brand enough already 🙂

        “Hoover is well-known for its prominent influence over national Republican policy….Some of Hoover’s major issues: education reform that centers around private school vouchers and charter schools, dismantling affirmative action, privatization of social services, ‘flat tax’ and other tax reduction schemes, deregulation of industry, Reagan’s policy legacy, and “character education.”

        http://www.rightwingwatch.org/content/hoover-institution

        http://www.stanforddaily.com/2012/11/25/protecting-stanfords-brand-name/

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        • 69Dawg

          Well I see my Florida comrade is out today. How are things at the Kremlin?

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          • Dog in Fla

            Chili but the threat alert level remains high as usual for death by poisoning from vodka, radioactive polonium-210 and the no suspicious circumstances death by one of five possible varieties of the lethal geselsium plant, the preferred double-agent weapon of choice for Russian assassins used most frequently in conjunction with “character education,” school vouchers and the Reagan policy legacy

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        • The Stanford brand on sports. Winners of multiple Sears cups. The other items at Stanford are not athletics. Important to look at but not sports brand. Nephew is a Stanford grad and he keeps the sports separate from the other.

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    • Buz

      They do look a little better….
      2007 4–8
      2008 5–7
      2009 8–5
      2010 12–1
      2011 11–2
      2012 12–2
      2013 11–3
      2014 8–5
      2015 10-2
      81-35

      2007 11–2
      2008 10–3
      2009 8–5
      2010 6–7
      2011 10–4
      2012 12–2
      2014 10–3
      2015 9–3
      76-29

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  15. Butler T. Reynolds

    I understand why people are saying that Georgia wants to be different than Auburn and Tennessee.

    But really, I thought Georgia wanted to be different than Alabama too.

    As great as Nick Saban is as a coach and as fun as it might be for the fans to cheer for a team with that much success, doesn’t it ring a little hollow?

    The fact is, Saban is not one of them. For those who hang their self-esteem on the success of their football team, I guess he delivers for them.

    But you get the vibe that Saban really couldn’t give a rat’s butt about all the Yellowhammers in the state. He may well find them disgusting.

    Vince Dooley was one of us. Ray Goff was too, which might play a part in why he lasted longer than Donnan, despite all the misery of those years.

    Mark Richt certainly was one of us. Heck, he was better than most of us, but not in the way that Nick Saban is.

    Even if you don’t buy in to his religious views, which I don’t, he inspired us to be better people. He made us proud to wear the red and black.

    If McGarity’s gamble works out, perhaps they’ll have to build more trophy cases in B-M. It will be fun, and it will make a lot of fans forget. But for those who want college football to be more than just a mini-NFL, it won’t feel nearly as good.

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  16. Kinda random observation. We didn’t have blogs and stuff back then, but anyone notice how much all of this mirrors the Donnan firing/Richt hiring? A firing that most people feel was handled very poorly (Remember Adams’ incompetence during the firing of Donnan?). Primary candidate is a longtime coordinator under one of the legends of the game, but was not a proven commodity.

    And you know what? As badly as the execution was flubbed, and as unproven as the new guy was, everything worked out great. The fact that Richt is fired now in no way changes the fact that he was a great hire. Took us to heights we hadn’t seen in a LOOOOOOOOONNNG time.

    Sometimes people succeed in spite of themselves. Let’s hope that happens with McG on this hire. 🙂

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    • Scorpio Jones, III

      Sure, Rev, we may as well hope, its all we got, there…ya know> 😀

      Sides, its only a game, right?

      Like

    • Donnan lost 3 in a row to tech and was a prickly jerk. That’s why he got canned. The program in 2000 wasn’t where it is now. We didn’t have candidates who were willing to beat the doors down to take the job. By the way, we got the best guy available in 2000. He had been a coordinator and QB coach for 15 years and, at the time, would have likely been Bowden’s successor if Bobby had retired around that time. His resume looked a lot more like Jimbo Fisher’s than Kirby Smart’s.

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      • I don’t disagree with any of that. Was really just more being hopeful/joking that perhaps McG will fall face first into a hire that turns out great, no matter how badly the process was that got him there. 🙂

        And no situation is ever exactly apples-to-apples, but you gotta admit there are striking similarities between the two.

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      • to be precise Donnan lost 2 and had one stolen away and what you call prickly I remember as refreshingly candid to dumb ass journalists who could not tell the difference between a cover two and man to man. Should have hired ERK… Waited too long to fire Goff ,fired Donnan too quickly, should have let Dooley leave as AD on his own schedule and clearly needed to not listen to the nattering nabobs of negativity regarding Richt….When does our athletic Dept get anything right. Other than hiring Dooley(thank you Joel Eaves) and hiring Richt((thank you Coach Dooley) not very often….I am NOT optimistic.

        Like

        • Yes, that’s true (damned Al Ford). I met him at a signing one time at Rich’s before the 2000 season. He was a complete @$$ who clearly didn’t want to be there.

          Everything else you said is right on, sir. I would also say hiring Tubby Smith was great as well.

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  17. Athens Dog

    If i don’t hit business goals for 10 years, do I still have a job. No.

    It was time. Fine man. Let’s move on. I’m excited to see who our next leader is.

    Like

    • All depends on how you define UGA’s “business goals”, doesn’t it?

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      • Athens Dog

        Yep. I think in my case for UGA it’s winning championships…..or at least competing for them. I don’t think that’s too much to ask given the resources. Ten years is a long time

        Like

        • GaskillDawg

          I think you mean winning championships, not competing for them. We competed for the championship in 2014. The SEC East came down to the day after Thanksgiving in 2014.

          Yeah, the 2013 record was not great after we lost Gurley, Marshall, Mitchell, N]Bennett, Conley, and Scott-Wesley after beating the then #6 teams in the country in September. I understand why 2013 went south. We competed in the SEC CG in 2012 and 2011. We were in the same division a the BCS champs in 2006 and 2008. We competed for the championship in 2007, tied for the SEC East and would have played for the SEC Championship if either Vandy or Kentucky had made short field goals.

          That takes us through the last 10 years. I think your complaint is us not winning championships, not competing for them. I understand and respect the the argument that we needed a change because he had not won a championship, even if I disagree. I think the argument that we were nt competitive the past ten years is contrary to the facts.

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  18. Slaw Dawg

    I guess I’m in the minority here, but I agree with Leitch’s point and had the same essential thought after I heard the news. While we may not (and hopefully won’t) descend to Barner levels, UGA Football stands revealed as just another big time CFB program that wants to win championships. It’s in the same stream of thought that leads to discontinuing ancient rivalry games, 16 team playoff, pandering to the TV Gods, piping in fake juice, playing “Sandstorm” everywhere and otherwise generalizing and NFL-ing college football. Maybe we were just haughty, naive saps for ever believing otherwise.

    Still, “classy” does exist elsewhere in the CFB world. In Charlottesville Saturday, we watched Va Tech pull out a late victory for retiring coach Frank Beamer against their hated UVA rival. It was a sloppy game, but the goodwill and appreciation for the man was palpable. Right after, we heard that Justin Fuente would be the new head coach and would retain Bud Foster and the younger Coach Beamer. As we drove our son back to Blacksburg the next day, and saw the many signs expressing appreciation for Coach Beamer’s accomplishments, I thought “this is how you do it.”

    Then my brother in law texted me about Richt’s firing and those “Thanks, Frank” signs suddenly struck me as bittersweet.

    The situations are certainly different, but I keep contrasting the swiftness and smoothness with which Va Tech handled its coaching transition and the embarrassments in Baton Rouge and Athens. So maybe that’s coloring my view of the situation. But I don’t think I’ll ever feel the same about UGA football, notwithstanding that I actually get why the decision was made.

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  19. illini84

    My career included a couple more years covering Richt’s Bulldogs and a two-year stint writing about University of Illinois athletics.
    If you don’t appreciate Richt enough already, Google “Tim Beckman Illinois.”
    In Champaign, I witnessed dysfunction, disrespect and disastrous attempts at playing football.
    So I was happy when I received the opportunity to come back to Athens to be the sports editor of OnlineAthens.com and the Banner-Herald.

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  20. UGA85

    I will miss CMR. I already miss him. But this is the nature of the business. Do we somehow think our program transcends other programs? Do we not have to win at UGA to be successful? Why do we think we are the only decent, clean program in the SEC, and CMR is the only coach with integrity? I don’t think Richt feels that way. Self-righteous indignation is not a virtue. I am tired of looking down my nose at other programs, especially after a loss, and claiming some kind of superiority. Let’s play ball, by the rules, and not put our new coach or our program on a pedestal.

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  21. Turd Ferguson

    “Now, no one can claim that, ever again.”

    Asinine.

    It’s amazing to me how many people have become amateur soothsayers over the past 48 hours. First of all, we don’t fucking know who the next head football coach will be. And second of all, we don’t fucking know what kind of man he’ll be when he gets here. So, for all we know, our next head football coach could be someone who both (a) coaches a team up to compete for championships, and (b) is a fantastic man, mentor, and ambassador for the university. And maybe the program could honestly and sincerely claim that (a) matters every bit as much as (b), but we had to fire Richt because he wasn’t fully living up to both standards anymore.

    Look, if I have a cell phone that takes crystal clear pictures and videos, has tons of great apps, etc., but doesn’t reliably enable clear phone calls, then as much as I love all those other perks, I ought to replace the phone. Why? Because it’s not doing the primary thing that a cell phone is supposed to do. It might be a great camera, a great mp3 player, a great gaming device, or whatever, but if it doesn’t reliably enable clear phone calls, then it’s not a great phone. And when the times comes that I need to contact someone, I’d much rather have the ancient Nokia in my pocket that could make a phone call from the bottom of the fucking ocean than the sleek new smartphone that does everything but.

    Now, last time I checked, the primary objective of all competitive endeavors is to win. (Not saying it’s the only objective, mind you. Just saying it’s the primary objective. Otherwise, it’s not really a competition.) As long as this is still the case, then, at the end of the day, it remains the most fitting measure of how great (or not) a head football coach really is.

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    • Turd Ferguson

      To follow up: When I hear people lamenting the fact that “UGA is apparently just another football program that wants to win championships,” to my ear, it’s like saying of the person who replaces the fancy cell phone, “You’re just another one of those people who expects his cell phone to reliably enable clear phone calls. How dare you, sir!”

      It’s fucking ridiculous.

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      • Agreed.

        And not pick on Slaw Dawg, but his line above:

        “UGA Football stands revealed as just another big time CFB program that wants to win championships.”

        I guess this is the line of thought that I just don’t get. When did we ever NOT value competing for championships? If Dooley hadn’t won 2 conference championships in his first 5 years and regularly beat FL down in Jax, he wouldn’t have lasted as long as he did, likely would have never made it to 1980. Goff and Donnan weren’t fired because they didn’t graduate enough players or build them into high enough quality men. They were fired because they weren’t fielding teams that could compete at the highest level.

        If Richt had not won 2 SEC titles right out of the gate, he would have been fired a long time ago. I honestly was never under the impression of anything less, no matter how much that he did “the right way”.

        Now I do believe that we operate under higher standards than the AU’s of the world in some specific areas that DO allow us to feel that the Georgia Way is different/better, and I do believe we were more patient with Richt than a lot of other schools would have been, especially after 2009/2010. But again, if Richt had never won an SEC title, he wouldn’t have lasted 15 years no matter how much he did it the right way, and surely nobody is under the impression that he should/would have?!?!? We fell in love with Richt, hard, those first 5 years. And that love kept him around a lot longer than most coaches would have lasted.

        But this “OH MY GOSH UGA WANTS TO FIELD A NATIONALLY COMPETITIVE TEAM NOW, I NEVER KNEW THAT WAS IMPORTANT!” meme that is quickly developing here just kinda blows my mind. I’ve never been under the impression that doing things “the right way” was more important than competing for championships – the only thing more important was maintaining the level of the reserve fund. 🙂

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        • Chickasaw

          Just to be clear about my own sentiments, it’s the “just another” part of my comment that I would emphasize. I’ve been Dawgfanning for decades and want badly to win any and all championships in sight, and never intended to imply otherwise, nor do I think my comments do so. And I’m unaware of anyone whose point of view is the one you have emphasized in caps–with all respect, RW, that’s quite a straw man you’ve stuffed there.

          But there are ways to win and there are ways to win, as you clearly recognize with your reference to AU (see, no straw man!). That implies we have some sort of standards we think are important. Are those standards only those that might get us into trouble if identified by NCAA snoops, or are those standards inherent in something we value as UGA alums? If the latter, do we want those exemplified in our sports programs and their head coaches? And, if so, how do we weigh those against the burning desire to win it all?

          McGarity’s Sunday decision, which job eliminates a coach who both secured wins and exemplified the standards, indicates that McG, at least, may believe winning championships are degrees more important than exemplifying the standards. Or that he has the competence to find someone who will win the championships and continue to exemplify the standards. I will be presently surprised if he succeeds in that, based on his prior and subsequent comments and performance.

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          • Chickasaw

            “Pleasantly” not “presently.” Jeez…

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          • Disagree with your characterization of my point as a straw man argument, but don’t disagree with your overall sentiment.

            My point is just that I don’t agree that firing Richt signals a shift in how much we value winning vs doing it the right way. The standard/expectation has always been to do both, at least that’s always been the impression I’ve been under. The reaction of some people seems like they are legitimately shocked that we would value winning as much as we would doing things the right way. And I’m not talking about winning all the games against crappy teams, but losing every time you play a decent team (I think we are something like 5-22 against ranked teams since 2008 or something like that). If you can’t go at least close to .500 against ranked teams, you ARE NOT securing wins.

            So my point was that I don’t know how people were ever under the impression that both weren’t equally important – and firing Richt doesn’t mean all of a sudden all we care about is winning/competing at the highest level, it means we want a coach that can do both. Again, it’s why we fired Goff and Donnan. Richt was A LOT better than them at first, but really not much better the last 5 years, he had simply fallen off. And (in my opinion, though others disagree) Richt had pretty well shown it just wasn’t going to happen under his watch.

            I wasn’t arguing for against the decision to fire. I was arguing against the perception that the decision means there’s been some fundamental shift in the values of the program. I simply don’t see it. Like I said above, we operate differently from the AU’s of the world in several specific areas, and we will continue to do so.

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      • DawgPhan

        Analogies about phone call clarity really make you seem with it.

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        • Turd Ferguson

          If you’ve got a problem with the analogy, let’s hear it. It’s meant to illustrate a pretty simple point, which is this: whether or not an X is a good X depends upon what an X is for. Knives that don’t cut well are not good knives, no matter what else they can do well; because cutting is what a knife is for. Calculators that do not reliably add figures correctly are not good calculators, no matter what else they can do well; because calculators are for calculating things correctly. I could go on and on, if you just don’t like the phone example. (Or you could just read Aristotle.)

          Some of us think that, while there may be many things that coaches are supposed to be for, the main one is to compete at the highest level at which a team or program can reasonably be expected to compete. And for that reason, we think that it was time for Richt to go, because there just weren’t enough reasons anymore to think that he could do that.

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          • DawgPhan

            phones arent about making calls, they are about connecting. Those connections are the function of the phone, not the call clarity.

            Call clarity is the virtue of one of the types of connection that the phone makes.

            Calls are actually one of the least efficient means of connecting provided by phones today.

            But seriously the analogy is weak, your Aristotle dig was sad, considering you missed the connection being the function of phones.

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            • Turd Ferguson

              You’re confusing two separate kinds: phone and smartphone. This was precisely the debate about early-generation iPhones. They were bad phones, but perhaps excellent members of a different kind — smartphones. Smartphones enable multiple forms of communication, so a particular device might be an excellent smartphone even if it’s unreliable with respect to a particular form or means of communication (e.g., phone calls). But in this case, it’s still count as a bad phone. The function (telos) of members of the kind phone is the same as it was when phones were invented, champ.

              So as an means of illustrating the significance of telos for determining a thing’s quality, the phone analogy is every bit as strong as any of the other analogies I mentioned. No surprise that you chose to simply ignore that obvious point. This all could’ve been avoided if you’d simply done your Aristotle homework, DawgPhan.

              Class dismissed.

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    • Normaltown Mike

      thanks Turd, I like your cell phone analogy.

      10 years of “If I can just reach that next hill, I’ll get a better signal”

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    • GaskillDawg

      You are exactly right, the next head coach may be the best human being ever. If he is it will be just luck, the same as if he happens to have the best lawn on the block. We will not be hiring him based on that characteristic.

      Just win baby.

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  22. Brandon

    I saw a tweet yesterday that summed it up nicely for me. Went something like. “UGA firing Richt is like the 8 that loved you dearly that you broke up with because you thought you had a shot at the 10, but instead you wind up marrying a 4 that can’t cook.”

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  23. If the success Richt has had isn’t good enough then I hope we’re prepared to do whatever it takes. We aren’t gonna get to the next level doing it The current Georgia Way. Stepping on throats and dabbling in the gray area like Bammer and Barn is what it takes today.

    Georgia football is no longer the Georgia football we’ve come to know. Those who only care about W/L should be ecstatic.

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  24. W Cobb Dawg

    Here’s hoping McGarity is gone before the next gtu game. Last year he made an ass of himself with the bradley interview, and this year he’s made a fricken fiasco of a coaching change. Throw in the TG3 mismanagement. McG leaves a trail of disasters in his wake. Get rid of him NOW!

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  25. @gatriguy

    No, the AD fired Richt bc he got taken apart by Bama, and FL, and FL last year, and blew a 3 TD lead against TN, and lost to Vandy and Missouri in 2013, and lost by 4 TDs to USC in 12, and lost to all 4 good teams he played in 11, and lost 7 games in 10, etc., etc., etc.

    I get that no one has much faith in McG lately, and that’s fine. But let’s not rewrite history and pretend that Richt hadn’t given any AD ample reason to pull the trigger.

    If Richt was any less of the person that he was, he’d have been gone in 2010.

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    • dudemankind

      Oh boy. If the new coach doesn’t win the playoff by year three then we are really going to hear it. People think Richt is a class act right now, but by then people will swear that he was purer than the driven snow.

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    • “If Richt was any less of the person that he was, he’d have been gone in 2010.”

      That calls for speculation … Dooley didn’t get fired after his one losing season in 1977. Goff didn’t get fired after his first losing season in 1991. Donnan didn’t get fired for his one losing season in 1996 (yes, I understand it was his first season). I wouldn’t have expected Richt to get fired after his one regardless of his personality (2011 would have been a completely different animal).

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      • Derek

        Not to quibble, but Goff’s first losing season was 1990. His second was 1993. His third was 1995. But anybody can win at Georgia!!!

        He also had a 6-6 (1990) and a 6-4-1 (1994) season. Only 2 decent seasons out of seven: 9-3 (1991) and 10-2 (1992).

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        • My bad … 1990 was a disaster. That’s what I meant. Damn middle age moment! 🙂

          He was 6-6 in 1989 (Peach Bowl loss to Syracuse), 4-7 in 1990 (with Joe Dupree and Greg Talley at QB), 9-3 in 1991 (Zeier’s freshman year), 10-2 in 1992 (when One Play Away Ray was born), 5-6 in 1993 (terrible defense), 6-4-1 in 1994 (alleged thrown game on Homecoming), and 6-6 in 1995 (Virginia in Peach Bowl).

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  26. Derek

    First, let me say that I generally agree with the sentiment. I do think that there are fans, me among them, who would rather not be Auburn or Alabama or FSU even if it means no shiny trophies. If we are to win any trophies I want it to be the end product of doing things the right way. I do think that are fans who could care less about the image of the program so long as we win. I think they are not the majority, but are a loud minority. There is even one “fan” who wanted to lose in order to get his way and others who supported that “fan,” if not the sentiment.
    Second, I do think its a leap to say that by releasing CMR that we’ve already drifted from being a program the majority of us want. We don’t know exactly what went on or why it happened. We also don’t know the direction that the school intends to go. I think we have to take a wait and see approach on that.
    If we liberalize the marijuana policy, greyshirt, medical redshirt kids, run kids off, yank scholly offers at the last minute them we will know that we are no longer trying to BEAT Alabama, but we are trying to BE Alabama. I’m an alum and an unconditional lifer, so I’ll be there whether we lose 50 in a row or we win 50 in a row with a bunch of illiterate gangsters. That’s not to say that I’ll be happy about the latter though. I don’t think we know just yet where we are headed. That’s the only area that I think the article goes too far in.

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    • Thank you, you summarized what I’ve been trying to say better than I did. Firing Richt doesn’t mean we’re now “All in” on winning at all costs. I get that people disagree with the decision (and I know you were one of them, which is why I appreciate your take on the matter), but connecting the dots of “Firing Richt” and “Now all our program cares about is winning” just cannot be connected without a big leap in logic.

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      • GaskillDawg

        I respect your opinion that firing Richt does not mean we are “all in.” But, let’s look at how other coaches’s agents are going to describe the UGA job:

        “Kirby, (or Tom, or DJ, or whomever) UGA just fired a coach with a 74% winning percentage because he did not win a championship. It’s football budget is the middle of the SEC even though its revenues are among the top, it’s policy concerning alcohol and weed is the strictest in the conference and you will have no control over whether to suspend for games or even which games the players are suspended for, the campus police will not handle incidents with players by calling the coaches first, the school policy prohibits oversigning and grayshirting. Forget about he liberal use of medical disqualification as a roster management strategy. Oh, and if you don’t mind standing in the security line at the Atlanta Airport they will buy you a Delta ticket to make a recruiting trip. Can you imagine Bill Battle telling Saban to put his carry-on on an overhead bin? Ha-ha!””
        Kirby (or whomever) : “Tell them that it is going to take more commitment from the school and if it will change those policies I will consider.”
        Think Kirby is dying to rid himself of the shackles that is the Alabama and Tuscaloosa policies affecting the team?

        If we want someone schooled in The Process we need to promise the same working conditions. It is not whether we choose to continue the Georgia Way. It is a matter of having to discontinue the Georgia Way to get candidates such as Kirby.

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        • Dog in Fla

          “It is a matter of having to discontinue the Georgia Way to get candidates such as Kirby.”

          a/k/a

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        • We need to get rid of the parts of the Georgia Way that hold the program back and to keep the parts that do make Georgia different from X, Y, and Z regardless of who the coach is. I’m not willing to throw most of it aside for the current leading candidate. Generally, I agree with your thoughts.

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        • One minor quibble – there’s no school policy against oversigning/grayshirting. We oversigned just this past class, I remember on signing day reading that we were over 85, but they figured normal attrition would handle it (and it did). That was an irrational fear of the “oversigning” label that kept us from doing it for so long. Unfortunately it took Richt too long to get past that fear. And I specifically remember Lorenzo Ward and Nathan Theus were originally offered as grayshirts, but there was enough room to bring them in once it was all said and done, but there’s no school policy there against grayshirting either. It was just that Richt never signed enough people for grayshirting to become an issue.

          The rest of your points are valid – but here’s the thing – we HAVEN’T changed those policies yet. If we do, then your point stands. If we don’t, and still land a quality coach, then it doesn’t. There’s no to prove or disprove your point right now. Which again, is why I say it’s a big leap in logic to say that “firing Mark Richt = All UGA cares about is winning now”.

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