The smoke thickens at Ole Miss.

I’m not sure I’d say there’s a full-blown fire, but at least you can see the smouldering embers.

Mississippi’s football program was cited by the NCAA in 13 of the 28 rules violations levied against the school in the notice of allegations the university recently received, with nine of the violations occurring during current coach Hugh Freeze’s tenure.

The breakdown of violations by sport was first reported Tuesday by The Associated Press by a person with knowledge of the investigation, and later confirmed for ESPN.com by multiple sources.

The violations are a mix of Level I, II and III; the NCAA considers Level I violations the most serious. Many of the violations have already been self-reported by the school and, as sources told ESPN’s Brett McMurphy on Tuesday night, the ones that took place under Freeze’s tenure are low-level violations.

Ole Miss officials reiterated that there “were no surprises” in the NCAA’s report.

Yeah, well, except for the fact when the news first broke, the current staff wasn’t implicated for anything other than Laremy Tunsil’s poor judgment.  Not to mention that “many of the violations” being self-reported ain’t the same as “all of the violations”.  So Ole Miss has some maneuvering to do with the NCAA.

There is some good news for the school, though, assuming this is accurate.

Sources confirmed to ESPN.com’s Chris Low on Tuesday that Ole Miss was not cited for the more serious failure-to-monitor charge and that Freeze was not personally named in any of the charges.

Still, there’s enough in all of that, particularly the bit about a booster illegally transporting a recruit to campus, to give the NCAA something to dig its teeth into.  I doubt the end result will be anything too overwhelming, but it won’t be nothing, either.  And that means Freeze’s recruiting will face heightened scrutiny going forward.

Gee, I wonder if anyone will mention that on the recruiting trail.

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26 Comments

Filed under SEC Football, The NCAA

26 responses to “The smoke thickens at Ole Miss.

  1. What does it take for a school to get in trouble? Didn’t Tunsil’s step-dad testify under oath that they took money?

    Why is the the only SEC school I’ve ever seen take any real heat in the last 20 years is Georgia for some autographs and selling a jersey.

    This shit is a joke.

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    • Russ

      +100

      Oh, and Cam’s dad turned down $180k so his son could go to Auburn. For free. And Cam was none the wiser.

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    • Bulldog Joe

      FSU, Clemson, and the other SEC schools put a much higher value on gaining and maintaining athletic competitive advantage than Georgia does.

      It is just a fact.

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      • Do we not have boosters? I have a spare backpack or two I’ll donate. If the NCAA doesn’t care can we please get this stuff going here?

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        • Bulldog Joe

          The boosters are only a part of it.

          Every competitive endeavor has its written rules and its unwritten rules. To be victorious, you have to understand and navigate both successfully. Georgia chooses to ignore the unwritten rules not for moral reasons, but for financial reasons.

          Since a large percentage of athletic revenue is now shared, a few institutions are happy keeping their costs down and collecting the margin. Georgia and Georgia Tech fall into this ‘low rent’ category. They don’t mind seeing the basketball team slaughtered on the court by AAU players they’ve forbidden their coaching staff from recruiting. This is perfectly OK as long as they can collect their share of the revenue generated by these programs without committing much of their own investment. See the link below as an example.

          In Ole Miss’ case, they made a decision to ante up and join most of the rest of the SEC in the ‘high rent’ category, leveling the field of competition for themselves. This includes an investment in the legal, COA, and other costs necessary to play by the unwritten rules. It is already paying off handsomely. For their troubles, they know they may have to fire a couple non-revenue coaches like UNC did and put a few more athletes on greyshirt for a semester or two. They also know there are no longer financial-based penalties like TV revenue and no one will ever see a ‘death penalty” again. This is a very small price to pay in comparison to the benefits they have already gained.

          I know many Georgia fans will disagree on this point, but it is the way I currently see the college athletic landscape at the P5 level.

          http://www.cbssports.com/collegebasketball/eye-on-college-basketball/24640320/report-kentucky-racked-up-nearly-450k-in-private-jet-costs-last-year

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          • I don’t disagree. And I’ll add that there’s a significant difference between “exploiting the system as it stands” and “rogue program,” a fact of which most programs are demonstrably aware.

            At Georgia, the prevailing policy seems to be to go overboard, err on the side of over-caution, and hope to be able to compete anyway, simply because we deserve it for being such an upstanding example-setter of a program.

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          • Bazooka Joe

            While I agree, I also am not naïve enough to think that we do not have “boosters” delivering cash to SA and prospective SA just like everyone else.

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    • Whiskeydawg

      Because Georgia was one of the schools that took the NCAA to court years ago and the NCAA lost and will never forget it.

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    • B-UGA

      Couldn’t agree more! BS! The NCAA investigates is a joke! They just go for the low hanging fruit. Anything that actually requires them to “investigate” or prove something is just a joke. The Auburns’ & Ol Miss’ have cheating down to a science. They just laugh at the NCAA & say, ‘prove it’.

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  2. It’s all because of Adams and ADGM.

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  3. This happens at Ole Miss, and the administration obfuscates, as most any administration at most any school would.

    If this kind of thing happened at Georgia, McGarity would bend over, drop his slacks, and beg for the pain.

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  4. ASEF

    So the pre-Signing Day spin was a rather large short sell. Shocking.

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  5. Russ

    Both Ole Miss and Tennessee have some ‘splainin’ to do.

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  6. I guess Hugh Sleaze’s invitation for anyone with a working brain to report any violations is coming home to roost. Sadly FSU and Auburn have shown that you can basically tell the NCAA to fuck off.

    Unless you’re GM and basically bend over to get fucked by them.

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  7. Normaltown Mike

    ESSS – EEEEE – SEEEE!!!!

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  8. Hey Tre Nixon, Ole Miss still looking that good to you now?

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  9. AusDawg85

    Confused and in an over abundance of caution, McGarrity has asked the NCAA to allow UGA to forfeit all prior games played vs. Ole Miss since the beginning of time.

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  10. W Cobb Dawg

    The bumbling oaf McGarity would take something like this and make it far, far worse. Ole miss will treat this as business as usual and nothing will happen.

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  11. Bright Idea

    Schools used to be most afraid of bowl bans and losing TV appearances, even more than a few lost scholarships. With those punishments now off the table they are less worried about rogue boosters doing “minor” stuff. The coaches and ADs say they didn’t know because they didn’t want to know. NCAA probation now means nothing.

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    • …except at Georgia, where the AD conducts an exhaustive self-investigation, digs up previously unknown and unreported possible violations, crawls on his snakelike belly to report those possible violations, then removes his undergarments and calls in the NCAA enforcement gimp.

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  12. Steve

    So. This report is saying that Troopha Taylor is now employed at Ole Miss?

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  13. Jt (the other one)

    So did anyone think for a NY minute that Ole Piss went from bottom dweller to competing for the West overnight on Sleeze’s recruiting ability alone?

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