This week, in Title IX litigation

It’s Tennessee’s turn to step up to the plate.

Six women filed a federal lawsuit on Tuesday claiming the University of Tennessee has created a student culture that enables sexual assaults by student-athletes, especially football players, and then uses an unusual, legalistic adjudication process that is biased against victims who step forward.

The lawsuit, filed by plaintiffs identified only as “Jane Does,” accuses five Tennessee athletes of sexual assault. They are former basketball player Yemi Makanjuola, former football players A.J. Johnson, Michael Williams and Riyahd Jones and a current football player named as a “John Doe.”

… In making its case that the university enabled an environment of bad behavior and used a disciplinary system that favored the players, the lawsuit cited more than a dozen incidents involving football players that included underage drinking, sexual harassment, assault, armed robbery and sexual assaults that did not involve the Jane Doe plaintiffs. Some of the incidents cited have previously never been reported.

What makes the situation in Knoxville somewhat unique in comparison with what we’ve seen alleged in places like Baylor and FSU is how institutionalized the process is made out to be.

The plaintiffs say that UT’s administrative hearing process, which is utilized by public universities across the state, is unfair because it provides students accused of sexual assault the right to attorneys and to confront their accusers through cross-examination and an evidentiary hearing in front of an administrative law judge. The administrative law judge who hears the case is appointed by [UT Chancellor) Cheek, the lawsuit says.

The details of that, as laid out in the complaint, are pretty amazing.

Tennessee is the only state in the country to use such an administrative hearing process, according to the lawsuit. The lawsuit claims that UT student-athletes frequently hired prominent Knoxville attorney Don Bosch to represent them in their administrative hearings.

“Athletes knew in advance that UT would: support them even after a complaint of sexual assault; arrange for top quality legal representation; and then direct them to the (Tennessee Uniform Administrative Procedures Act) hearing procedure that denies victims the right to a hearing and to the same equal procedural, hearing, and process rights as given to perpetrators of rape and sexual assault,” the plaintiffs said in their lawsuit.

That’s gotta be encouraging for a rape victim.  It certainly gives the administration a certain level of comfort in managing the process, and that’s what several of the allegations made in the suit point towards.

“UT administration (Chancellor Jimmy Cheek), athletic department (Vice Chancellor and Athletics Director) Dave Hart and football coach (Butch Jones) were personally aware (as ‘appropriate persons’ under Title IX) and had actual notice of previous sexual assaults and rapes by football players, yet acted with deliberate indifference to the serious risks of sexual assaults and failed to take corrective actions,” the plaintiffs said in their lawsuit…

The university “delayed the investigation process until the athlete perpetrators transferred to another school or graduated without  sanction or discipline,” the lawsuit said. Johnson was suspended at the end of his senior season but was able to participate in the UT commencement ceremony…

And this allegation is just nasty.

Two of the student-athletes named in the lawsuit — Johnson and Makanjuola — were publicly praised by UT coaches and administrators while they remained on their teams, graduated or transferred, even as those officials were aware that sexual assault allegations had been made against the players.

If true, either these people are too stupid or too lazy to worry about plausible deniability – or simply too arrogant.

There’s plenty more alleged in the complaint.  I don’t see how Tennessee has any choice but to fight this hard, given the way people all the way up the chain of command are named.  In any event, it sure looks like all the rumors about misbehaving Vol players being coddled by the administration going all the way back to the Fulmer era are coming home to roost.  Ugly.

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82 Comments

Filed under Because Nothing Sucks Like A Big Orange, Crime and Punishment, See You In Court

82 responses to “This week, in Title IX litigation

  1. Bulldog Joe

    Like FSU, this one is destined for a quick payoff with no policy changes.

    Cost of doing business. Same as it ever was.

    Like

    • Honestly, I’m not sure I agree in this case, at least if the allegations about the process and the involvement of UT administration prove accurate.

      Like

      • Bulldog Joe

        We’ll see. In that community, the university and the athletic department have a long track record of winning these cases and/or settling out of court.

        The Bensel-Meyers, Naughtright, and the long list of athlete criminal cases settled in favor of the university’s interests make for an overwhelming precedent on how these things are handled locally.

        They call them Teflon Tennessee for good reason.

        Like

      • SemperFiDawg

        Agreed. This is BIG, UGLY, and INSTITUTIONALIZED.

        Like

        • You nailed it, SFD.

          Set aside for a moment the individual cases and the he said / she said aspects that people spend countless hours arguing which isn’t what the problem is about. Strip all that away and the real issue is that there’s a culture and systems in place on our college campuses that discourage women with legitimate sexual assault claims from reporting them because it shows them massive indifference and is openly hostile towards them especially when it involves their most valuable commodities (i.e. football and basketball players).

          Reporting means they have to deal with the pain of re-opening old wounds and knowing they’re going be accused of deserving / wanting whatever happened to them. Women don’t report because it’s easier to deal with the emotional scars through something like therapy than it is to seek justice and most of them know that little to nothing will likely ever happen to the person that has wronged them. Instead they fail out of school because of the emotional trauma (similar to soldiers coming back with PTSD) and some have even committed suicide because of the shame and the guilt they carry as a victim (I feel like there was a woman that went to a neighboring school of Notre Dame that claimed she was raped by a football player killer herself a few years ago when Notre Dame stonewalled it). I don’t see how anybody with any level of decency or humanity can’t see this as a failure and a blight on our society.

          Like

  2. truck

    Couldn’t happen to a nicer bunch. Here’s to orange blood in the streets of Knoxville.

    Like

  3. Let’s see how long the Tennessean follows this. If this were the AUC and Georgia, it would be on the front page consistently for the next 6 months.

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  4. TN Dawg

    Have no fear Senator, the liberal Board of Regents and progressive student body have a plan for dealing with it.

    “A Sex Week organizer defended the controversial events, saying that they are necessary to reduce sexual assault. “In order to combat rape culture, we have to stop the sexual repression, because less sexual oppression leads to less sexual violence,” junior Nicky Hackenbrack, a board member of Sexual Empowerment and Awareness at Tennessee (SEAT), wrote in a piece for The Daily Beacon, the college’s newspaper.”

    http://fellowshipoftheminds.com/2014/02/07/universities-sponsor-sex-week-on-porn-anal-sex-and-s-m-bondage/

    Like

    • Dawgwalker07

      Yikes. That’s some jacked up logic. Sadly, I have a feeling that UT is not the only major university that has people who think this way.

      Like

    • ASEF

      Liberal Board of Regents? Aren’t those positions political? Tennessee hasn’t had a liberal in a position of state-wide political power in two decades.

      Like

      • TN Dawg

        Tennessee’s political power shift occurred about 8 years ago, though we had a (D) governor as as recently as six years ago.

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        • Walt

          Tennessee has a republican governor, 2 republican senators, and 7 of 9 members of of congress are republican, 28 of 33 state senators are republican and 73 of 99 state house members are republican. How did those sneaky liberal bastards get on the board of regents?

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      • W Cobb Dawg

        With the exception of a very few like Gore, I strongly doubt there’s been many ‘liberals’ involved in the political power structure going back to the founding of the state, regardless of the party that holds power. But hey, if it makes you feel better to grind the axe, grind away.

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  5. Rp

    “The plaintiffs say that UT’s administrative hearing process, which is utilized by public universities across the state, is unfair because it provides students accused of sexual assault the right to attorneys and to confront their accusers through cross-examination and an evidentiary hearing in front of an administrative law judge.”

    WOW! This is a great illustration of how jacked up the campus sexual assault issue is. These folks want to deny males attending college of the same due process every other American expects when accused of a serious crime. If there is a “war on women” they are certainly fighting back and fighting dirty.

    Like

    • DawgPhan

      I think that the difference is that the process allows the accused those rights, but denies them to the accuser.

      Also schools shouldn’t be in the sexual assault investigating business.

      Like

    • Did you miss the part about the victims being denied due process rights that are granted to the accused when you were jerking your knee so hard?

      “Athletes knew in advance that UT would: support them even after a complaint of sexual assault; arrange for top quality legal representation; and then direct them to the (Tennessee Uniform Administrative Procedures Act) hearing procedure that denies victims the right to a hearing and to the same equal procedural, hearing, and process rights as given to perpetrators of rape and sexual assault,” the plaintiffs said in their lawsuit.

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      • Rp

        I guess I’m confused. If the accused is at a hearing in front of an ALJ where he can cross-examine the accuser, aren’t they both being afforded a hearing? And if the accused is cross examining, then the accuser was obviously allowed to present her case.

        Does the accuser not have the ability to cross examine the accused?

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        • To your last question – that’s exactly what the lawsuit is alleging; that the accuser is not afforded the same procedural rights as the accused.

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          • Rp

            Got it. I just tried reading the act and it is too damn long. The section on hearing procedure sure sounds like a normal (both sides present their case) arrangement to me.

            College sexual assault cases are the worst. Its almost always a he said she said situation and I just want everyone to remember that in this country we have a tradition of innocent until proven guilty. The sad part is this will result in guys who are guilty getting away with it because there was not enough proof. But if we err the other way it will (and already has) resulted in innocent men having their lives ruined over BS allegations. I believe you have to go with the former.

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            • The bottom line is, as someone else said, colleges have no business investigating this stuff. It’s a criminal matter and it should be the police and courts handling it instead.

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              • Napoleon BonerFart

                Doesn’t Title IX require schools to investigate?

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              • SouthernYank

                Unfortunately, that’s not the case. And the current Admin has encouraged the schools to do just that: https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/dear_colleague_sexual_violence.pdf

                Based on this, the allegations in this suit appear to be fantastic. I highly doubt we have any school providing representation to athletes and denying it to the accuser.

                However, I could give two sh*ts what any student code of conduct says. If your kid is an accuser or an accused, lawyer up immediately. Let the school claim that they can’t be represented. Then sit back, file your suit, and decide which building you want your name on.

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              • SouthernYank

                Post this previously in reply to wrong post. My bad!

                Unfortunately, that’s not the case. And the current Admin has encouraged the schools to do just that: https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/dear_colleague_sexual_violence.pdf

                Based on this, the allegations in this suit appear to be fantastic. I highly doubt we have any school providing representation to athletes and denying it to the accuser.

                However, I could give two sh*ts what any student code of conduct says. If your kid is an accuser or an accused, lawyer up immediately. Let the school claim that they can’t be represented. Then sit back, file your suit, and decide which building you want your name on.

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        • So you think it’s fine for an alleged rape victim to have to obtain counsel in order to pursue her claim?

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          • Rp

            Thank you. I see the issue. The school is providing or helping the accused obtain counsel but not the accuser. That is unfair if counsel is required to attend the hearing. Is there not anyone that assumes the role of DA on behalf of the accuser in this process?

            This takes us back to another poster above and how colleges don’t need to be in the business of investigating and adjudicating felonies.

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          • Mr. Tu

            The case should be pursued by the DA, not by the school, or private counsel. And, of course, the accused should have the right to counsel and to cross-examine the witnesses, even the accuser. The reason the accuser doesn’t have the same right to cross-examine the accused is, I imagine, due to the pesky 5th Amendment.

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  6. Here’s to every Dawg fan that kept lamenting the fact that we let AJ get out of the state. Even if they are great at football, we don’t want all of these guys. I’m interested to see if we start seeing a more lax attitude toward things (not necessarily violent, but other things) with the new staff. This does help other teams.

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  7. South fl dawg

    That sounds like Penn State with women instead of kids. Everyone was upset when the victims were kids; let’s see how many people are upset when the victims are adult women. Also Iet’s see how many more women come forward.

    Like

  8. Dog in Fla

    “UT administration (Chancellor Jimmy Cheek), athletic department (Vice Chancellor and Athletics Director) Dave Hart and football coach (Butch Jones) were personally aware (as ‘appropriate persons’ under Title IX)”

    That’s only because (Vice Chancellor and Athletics Director) Dave Hart, Jr., perfected his plausible deniability awareness skills over a long period of time. He was the executive director of athletics at Alabama (his alma mater) assisting Alabama athletic director Mal Moore.

    Before Mama called, Dave Hart, Jr., spent 12 years as Florida State’s athletic director when Dave Hart, Jr., “left Florida State after he was told by the school’s president, T.K. Wetherell, that his contract would not be renewed the following year.

    His departure coincided with an academic scandal that resulted in the vacating of wins by the Seminoles football program and four years of probation. Hart said his decision to leave was made before the scandal was uncovered by the university and was instead the result of disagreements with Wetherell.”

    http://espn.go.com/college-sports/story/_/id/6933615/tennessee-volunteers-hires-dave-hart-alabama-crimson-tide-new-athletic-director

    Like

  9. Macallanlover

    Former Vice Chancellor Tim Rogers should make for a very interesting witness, if his life isn’t threatened by the Vol fanatics before he can testify or be deposed. His actions seemed to show he felt strongly about what he knew and had a major conflict with the administration’s handling of what he brought forward. Of course this is the same group that brushed away the cop stomp incident a few years ago.

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  10. TN Dawg

    I commend UT on granting students the right to an attorney, which ought to be common sense.

    As for Cheek appointing the judge, well that’s another story entirely.

    Frankly, all colleges would do well to leave law enforcement to law enforcement and the judicial system to the judicial system. That solves the problem.

    The real problem is that universities want to handle these issues “in-house”. Let a grand jury review evidence and return indictments if claims have merit.

    Like

    • Napoleon BonerFart

      I agree that even college students accused of serious crimes should have due process rights. The problem is that the USDOE, as well as many legislators, sees it differently. The DOE currently recommends that schools use the preponderance of the evidence (>50%) standard when deciding on sex crimes.

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  11. Hogbody Spradlin

    I’m not sure where the center of gravity is here, but it’s not in denying the accused the right to counsel and cross examination. It’s interesting that Tennessee is where Glenn Harlan Reynolds (Instapundit) teaches Con Law. He is a major voice against the current trend in campus procedures for rape accusations, which strongly favor accusers. Athlete involvement probably makes this a different can of worms.

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  12. Debby Balcer

    Both victim and accused should have the right to attorneys. Rape cases should be investigated by the police not the school. Have any of the players been convicted? I hope they have been but would not be surprised if they were not tried because the victim was traumatized by the process at UT.

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    • Dog in Fla

      Victim traumatization by the process at UT is designed as a feature not a bug.

      Perhaps Commissar Sankey will devote as much attention to this bad design feature as he does to Springtime for Harbaugh

      Like

    • Napoleon BonerFart

      While I don’t think accusers should be denied attorneys, I don’t know why they would need an attorney. The accused faces serious consequences, including expulsion. Regardless of the outcome of the hearing, the accused wouldn’t face any consequences.

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      • Napoleon BonerFart

        Also, if the accusers want their cases handled by the police/prosecutors, they can certainly choose to involve them. However, the accused will have due process rights, which it sounds like the women who have brought this lawsuit object to.

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    • TN Dawg

      Yes, AJ Johnson went to jail for rape….after the season.

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      • TN Dawg

        Of course for those of us who have been around Knox-Vegas for awhile, this is nothing new.

        I remember when Jeffrey Underwood murdered a student and wasn’t tried until after the season back in the late 80’s.

        They justify it around here the way every fan does with the “that happens at all schools” mantra. I guess that’s one reason I always appreciated CMR, he didn’t always win, but he never let ’em get away with murder.

        Like

      • TN Dawg

        Correction, AJ was arrested and charged, but is still awaiting trial.

        Like

  13. Bobby

    Looks like the plaintiffs are using Simpson v. University of Colorado Boulder, 500 F.3d 1170 (10th Cir. 2007) as a blueprint.

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  14. Normaltown Mike

    In loco parentis is el stupido

    Like

  15. Bright Idea

    Is guaranteeing the student-athlete high-dollar legal representation when they are accused of rape a new recruiting tool? Why is that necessary? Why can’t they use the same public defender that anyone else who can’t afford a lawyer would have to settle for? I guess every Knoxville, Tallahassee, and yes Athens have prominent attorneys willing to do it for free.

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  16. Dog in Fla

    @Hogbody Spradlin February 10, 2016 at 9:56 AM

    “Glenn Harlan Reynolds (Instapundit)” a/k/a Instaputz (2006 -2013)

    http://instaputz.blogspot.com/

    Monday, December 04, 2006
    Putz on Iraq: a timeline.
    Since Putz has so generously offered to hold a symposium on what to do about the Great Victory in Iraq disaster, we thought this brief timeline would be useful for the participants.

    9/11/01
    Suggests attacks on WTC give Bush license to nuke Baghdad.

    6/4/02
    Suggests that Mohammed Atta met with Iraqi intelligence before 9/11 (and again on 8/4/02).

    6/22/02
    Promotes connection between Iraq and the Oklahoma City bombing.

    8/13/02
    Argues that invading Iraq is important for “psychological reasons”, i.e., to humiliate the Arab world.

    8/29/02
    Pooh-poohs worries about Iraq as a Vietnam-style trap.

    9/4/02
    Promotes theory that Osama bin Laden is a puppet of Saddam Hussein.

    9/6/02
    Promotes Iraq-al Qaeda connection. Also once again promotes operational connection between Timothy McVeigh and Iraq.

    9/14/02
    Compares Scott Ritter, who was speaking out against a preemptive US invasion of Iraq, to surrenderist defenders of the Soviet Union and Pol Pot.

    9/16/02
    Suggests Saddam will have a nuclear weapon in three months.

    9/28/02
    Hypes Saddam’s nuclear threat again.

    3/26/03
    Begins series of “they’re not antiwar–they’re just on the other side” posts.

    6/1/03
    Argues that things look “pretty good” in Iraq despite the press’s “bogus looting stories” that were attempts to “hurt Bush.”

    7/11/03
    Promotes connection between Saddam and Osama.

    11/12/03
    Insists that attacks in Iraq are akin to the Battle of the Bulge and not an indication things are going “badly.” Claims that “anti-war types” want “America to lose” and “dance on our soldiers’ graves” but doesn’t name any.

    4/6/04
    Accuses Ted Kennedy of emboldening our enemies by comparing Iraq to Vietnam.

    4/20/04
    Accuses Michael Moore of giving “aid and comfort” to the terrorists.

    7/19/04
    Again promotes Saddam-al Qaeda connection.

    3/23/05
    Triumphantly announces that we’re winning in Iraq and that the press is wrong. Predicts that it’s only a matter of time before Ted Kennedy will be taking the credit for it. Also, brags that blogs like Instapundit helped “neutralize the psychological warfare” of the terrorists.

    11/11/05
    Accuses Democratic critics of the Iraq war of being unpatriotic and hurting our troops abroad.

    12/18/05
    Says Bush believes we’re winning in Iraq and that he thinks it will be obvious by November 2006.

    1/14/06
    Calls John Murtha, who began publicly criticizing the war, a disgrace.

    1/26/06
    Announces that we’re winning in Iraq again.

    4/18/06
    Calls generals who publcily criticized Rumsfeld “gutless.”

    5/9/2006
    Says we’re winning again, which you’d know if you were “paying attention.”

    6/8/06
    On the death of Zarqawi, accuses the press of emboldening the terrorists.

    6/26/06
    Breathlessly promotes Rick Santorum’s “discovery” of WMD in Iraq.

    8/22/06
    Compares Iraq to Iwo Jima.

    8/26/06
    Compares the violence in Iraq to the violence in Philadelphia. Says the war “isn’t terribly bloody.”

    9/1/06
    Promotes bogus data indicating that violence is down in Iraq. Has to post a correction shortly after.

    9/17/06
    Wonders why Bush doesn’t invade Iran, since Iran is the cause of “much of the problem” in Iraq.

    10/23/06
    Calls Americans who are worried about Iraq “cranky.”

    12/03/06
    Offers to run symposium about what to do about Iraq.

    http://instaputz.blogspot.com/2006/12/putz-on-iraq-timeline.html

    Like

    • Macallanlover

      I know it is your current passion to defend cowardly, Muslim terrorists (they are all the rage these days/years you know) and bullies but wondering if you would defend Hitler, Stalin, and Mao with the same enthusiasm you do on the computer trying to deflect outrage away from the slimeballs? Mass murder and genocide hasn’t changed much as an offense. Saddam was over a half million murdered before we helped rid the world of his act. (I realize you would have been handicapped without a keyboard, but would you have stood on the street corners of villages with a bullhorn?) How many lives would we have saved if Bush senior had continued the Gulf War by marching on Baghdad and ending that regime in the 90s? I don’t feel that should be America’s role in many cases but I have spoken with many from the generation before us who seriously regretted letting Hitler run wild for many years without getting involved in bringing him down.

      And by the way, many Dimocrats ARE unpatriotic and hurt troops abroad (and at home). Mostly in the leadership,of the party, not the sheep who blindly follow, as best they can with their heads stuck in the sand.

      Like

      • Napoleon BonerFart

        I’m no liberal, but I am against war. The problem with getting into the Middle East is that, despite the neocons’ fantasies, there is no Jeffersonian democracy ready to spring up. If you replace a brutal, secular dictator, like Hussein, you create a power vacuum that allows a brutal, theistic regime, like ISIS, to emerge.

        Terrorists are bad, but 15 years since Gulf War II started, we’ve only created more terrorists. Now, we’re in Syria where Al Qaeda, ISIS, and Assad are all vying for power. We definitely don’t want to allow Assad (another brutal, secular dictator) to stay in power. We probably don’t want ISIS in power, so it looks like Al Qaeda wins by default. Hooray for getting involved!

        If we had never left Iraq during 91, we would probably still be there fighting terrorists. Actually, it was our reneging on our agreement with the Saudis to remove our air bases after the war that was one of the main reasons Al Qaeda executed the 9/11 attacks in the first place. So I don’t think we would have helped anything by antagonizing terrorists even more than we already did.

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        • Wait and See

          This is western arrogance. “I don’t like war. It’s not my problem” OK, duh. Raise your hand if your love war. (If your hand is raised, you’re an idiot). Let’s just assume that most people don’t like war. But, there are some really bad guys doing some really bad things out there. What do you do with them? I read a story about ISIS where they cut the fingers off a 12 year old boy because he was suspected of being Christian. I literally cried. I have a 12 year old boy; I expect when I go get him this afternoon he will have all his fingers. Would you help your neighbor if his house was on fire? At what geographical line do you stop caring? County line? State line? Outside the US? Hey buddy, one planet. No easy solutions but, I’ll give it a try. Find bad guys, kill them. The only reason this doesn’t work is because we always quit before the job is done. Many find it more tasteful to discuss how terrible America is while sipping on a hot latte’.

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          • Dog in Fla

            “At what geographical line do you stop caring? County line? State line? Outside the US?”

            Mac’s lawn. Stay off it. If you do go on it, keep quiet b/c Mac’s having seances with WWII vets about Hitler

            Like

          • Cosmic Dawg

            Western arrogance is doing things like supporting our own dictators, using the CIA to overthrow regimes in the middle east since the 50’s, etc – and expecting no blowback.

            I’m not saying we let Isis take over or leave Iran to their nukes, at this point, but we’ve certainly contributed mightily to the problem and I rarely expect the brain trust in D.C. to get anything right, foreign or domestic, or to be free of political influence in every last decision they make.

            For a small government guy like me, your argument about territory cuts both ways. Our govt is too corrupt and incompetent to manage more than the rudimentary tasks here at home, and that’s exactly the skill set and ethics they bring to managing other people’s lives abroad.

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          • Napoleon BonerFart

            There are two issues with your humble foreign policy of policing the world. First, does DC have the right to police the world and force all other nations to comply with our demands? There is an intelligent, rational, and moral argument that DC does not have that right.

            Second, even if America has the best values in the world and has the right to force the rest of the world to live by its rules, does it work? America has been involved in Iraq since 1990. America has had an ongoing military presence in Iraq since 2003. After all that time, the problems of Iraq have gotten worse. Personally, I find the argument that we just need another year?, decade?, generation?, to get to a good result to be magical thinking. Maybe Santa Claus will give us democracy in the Middle East if we’re very good boys and girls this year.

            I care as much as anyone about the Arabs as anyone. That’s why I don’t want American planes bombing them and American troops shooting them. Even if it is for their own good.

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          • Bazooka Joe

            First of all – its not our fight. We are not (ok we seem to be but we should NOT be) the worlds policemen. You want to be the policeman ? Fine, you go and be sure to take your kids along with you. #2 – Every country we have gone into in the middle east with our holier than thou democracy gig is now worse off than before we intervened. Iraq, Libya, Syria, etc…. (I do not include Afghanistan in this because for obvious reasons we had to go there because thats where Osama was).There is a reason these countries have strong man dictators – the population is so fractured along tribal and religious lines that they would tear each other apart without a strong (and yes a lot of times brutal) dictator in power. They are just not ready for democracy and we shouldn’t be trying to ram it down their throats.

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            • Bazooka Joe

              I forgot you can also include countries such as Egypt, Algeria, Tunisia, etc… Although we did not have direct intervention they are by-products of the ones we did (and they are also all worse off than before)

              Like

      • Dog in Fla

        “I don’t feel that should be America’s role in many cases”

        Excellent point. Why not just have the Chinese do it

        Like

  17. SouthernYank

    “The plaintiffs say that UT’s administrative hearing process, which is utilized by public universities across the state, is unfair because it provides students accused of sexual assault the right to attorneys and to confront their accusers through cross-examination and an evidentiary hearing in front of an administrative law judge. The administrative law judge who hears the case is appointed by [UT Chancellor) Cheek, the lawsuit says.”

    Yes, this is “unfair”. Give me a break.

    Like

  18. Wait and See

    Thank goodness they didn’t have any scooter incidences!!

    Like

  19. gatorhater27

    I’m surprised this part of the lawsuit didn’t make it into the Tennessean article:

    http://www.courier-journal.com/story/sports/college/ut/2016/02/10/lawsuit-tennessee-player-put-hit-teammate-helping-rape-victim/80170032/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

    University of Tennessee football players confronted and assaulted wide receiver Drae Bowles as retribution for helping a woman who said she was raped by then-Volunteer players A.J. Johnson and Mike Williams, according to a federal lawsuit filed in Nashville on Tuesday.

    Bowles took the woman to a hospital on the night of the alleged rape in November 2014 and supported her decision to report the incident to authorities, according to the lawsuit.

    While the woman, a student-athlete, was meeting with executive senior associate athletics director Jon Gilbert, senior associate athletics director Mike Ward and her coach, she received a message from her roommate “who was witnessing at that moment several football players jumping” Bowles, the lawsuit says. The woman informed the athletics officials of the incident and was told they would “look into it,” according to the suit. The lawsuit says “athletic coaches were present during that altercation.”

    Days later, the woman learned that Bowles was assaulted a second time at the team facility by the same players, the lawsuit says. She reported the second assault to university administrators as well.

    Like

  20. rocksalt

    Why don’t these victims go to the cops? What is the value for them of pursuing it through the University?

    Like

    • If the assault occurs on campus, which cops do you think have authority?

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      • Macallanlover

        While initial response may be from campus police, I would think local, state, and federal laws prevail so authority of campus police would be trumped. I realize the schools have guidelines and policies that apply to procedures for handling reports of violence but surely any citizen can choose to bypass those and go directly to law officials not employed by the school.

        Like

    • Napoleon BonerFart

      Accused students have due process rights when dealing with cops and prosecutors. Schools don’t have to afford the accused those same rights. So it’s easier for the accusers to win their case.

      Like