If Ole Miss ain’t cheatin’, it ain’t tryin’.

From the Oxford Citizen (h/t):

… Hot flash to the NCAA, the fans don’t care or understand your laws. What the fans that pack Vaught-Hemingway Stadium want to see on a Saturday afternoon is a good game. And preferably a win.

You think people who pay $1,600 for four season tickets care if a player’s family got an extra $800 at the airport or not? You think the vast majority of those same ticket holders care if Laremy Tunsil or CJ Hampton are driving around with a loaner Nissan Titan or Dodge Challenger? Most people would say “It’s not my car. It’s not my issue. I just want to see a win over Alabama for the first time in my life.”

Hot flash to the Oxford Citizen, Ole Miss is a member of the NCAA.  The NCAA is the schools’ creation.  When you’re bitching at the NCAA, you’re bitching at Ole Miss.  Which, of course, is kind of detail the fans that pack Vaught-Hemingway Stadium don’t really want to think about.

30 Comments

Filed under General Idiocy, Media Punditry/Foibles, The NCAA

30 responses to “If Ole Miss ain’t cheatin’, it ain’t tryin’.

  1. Jt (the other one)

    I don’t like some of the idiotic NCAA rules…some purely are idiotic and quite frankly run counter to our laws, but I agree with the fact that Ole Piss is a member of the NCAA therefore has agreed to abide by the by laws etc…of said stupid institution…

    • Saxondawg

      “Hot flash to the NCAA, the fans don’t care or understand your laws.” They are just cave men, and the NCAA’s modern ways frighten and confuse them.

  2. Walt

    Oh how the times have changed. I’m from Louisiana and few good friends of mine were buddies with Ole Miss QB John Fourcade, who was recruited by Ole Miss out of Gretna, LA in the lats 70s. Ole Miss GAVE Fourcade a Datsun 280Z.

  3. Gaskilldawg

    The “Let’s disband the NCAA” argument he makes shows he has not thought through this outrage. The NCAA is a true democracy in that the members vote on the rules.

    If his request were to come true I guess individual colleges would organize their own games. Do the two teams negotiate the set of rules by which they play the game? By the way, Ole Miss would say “goodbye” to that $2,000,000+ annual share of the NCAA basketball tournament check, and those fans would be paying more than $1,600.00 for 4 season tickets in order to replace that revenue. Without rules set through a governing organization requiring players to be at least enrolled as students he would have us return to the good old days such as our first game against Tech when Tech suited out a bunch of Army officers from Fort McPherson in White and Gold.

    If the writer is merely echoing the visceral screams of Joe Typical Mississippian then that State is full of folks that do not think much.

  4. VoxDawg

    The fact that OM willingly gave up a dozen scholarships over a 4 year period tells you everything you need to know as to their guilt. Self-imposed scholarship limits only means that they promise to cheat 10% less while recruiting during the next election cycle.

    • aristoggle

      Hmm … it occurs to me that it comes down to simple economics. The fewer scholarships you award, the more money you can give to those who do receive one. Brilliant idea!

  5. Gurkha Dawg

    Yep, that has to be one of the most stupid things I have read in a while. If Ole Miss wants to do away with the rules, do they really think they can out bid Bama or UGA or TX etc for the services of the Tunsils of high school football? They would be worse off than they ever were.

    • Macallanlover

      True, in a Wild West shootout with laws being ignored, Tunsil never even takes a trip to Oxford. Ole Miss fans really don’t care if money is flowing to athletes, and cars are provided? Jeez.

    • WF Dawg

      Great point there, Gurkha.

  6. 69Dawg

    I think the NCAA’s biggest problem is not setting the rules of the games but the social engineering part of the rule book. The let’s keep a level playing field between teams that are so diverse that the playing field can’t ever be level is killing the game. This level playing field doctrine and the how do we keep these “scholar athletes” limited to just a scholarship and nothing more has cost the NCAA almost all of the credibility it has built up over all of these years.
    Sure the NCAA is a member run organization but then so is the Federal government. The NCAA has a tone deaf bureaucracy with too many members having too many agendas. It is time they reorganized football using some real classifications based on which conferences are Division I FBS, Div I FCS and all the want to be’s. These are the rules of the actual game, and these are the classifications now have at it. Screw the level playing field.

    • Gaskilldawg

      The NCAA governing structure is totally different from the government set up. The NCAA members all directly vote for the rules. The Constitution sets up 2 legislative bodies. One represents districts and one represents states. Once you and I and everyone else can go to DC and vote directly on bills then thenter citizens ‘ input to laws will equal colleges ‘ input on rules.

  7. Gurkha Dawg

    I have a general question for all you smart lawyers out there. I asked it a while back in a post that was a couple of days old and didn’t get a response.
    I know a lawyer can’t tell a client to lie under oath, but can they advise him to lie if he is not under oath at the time? Such to the media, NCAA, police, etc.?

    • Dylan Dreyer's Booty

      At the risk of sounding all Bill Clinton, it depends. I don’t think you can ever advise a client to voluntarily tell a lie. But – and this comes from a class I took taught by the Honorable Larry Edmondson – if you don’t get asked if you wear glasses or did you have them on at the time you have no obligation to volunteer that information. I’ve heard dissenting viewpoints.

      • 81Dog

        there is a huge difference between telling a lie and failing to volunteer information, especially when you are being questioned by someone who is not seeking to help you. You aren’t obligated to actively assist someone else in their investigation, but you are obligated to answer questions truthfully, if you answer them at all.

  8. Sh3rl0ck

    Frankenstein’s Monster did nothing wrong.

  9. PTC DAWG

    This. is. HIGHlarious.

  10. Irwin R. Fletcher

    I’m pretty sure “Hot Flash” was it the phrase he was looking for but carry on.

  11. W Cobb Dawg

    Hot flash to the Oxford Citizen, google 3 words: SMU death penalty.

  12. Cojones

    I think somma’ yall are drankin’ early by your replies.

    For the local community representative of town and University, this editorial staff fails as the moral leader of it’s citizens. They seem as if to have only lately emerged from flying the Confederate Battle Flag as a symbol of a dead past…..oh, wait… .. …

    • Macallanlover

      The past is never dead old timer, it is just the past. The emotions, scars, and lessons taken from the past always impact the current and future. There is no delete button to scrub the past away. The stains and pains are always there, some deal with it and gain perspective and wisdom from it. Others, not so much. Many of the current problems with this country stem from a lack of learning from past events, policies, etc.

      • Cojones

        History repeats itself and that’s why you have to learn it so as not to be in the repeatin’ bunch. If you didn’t learn in the first pass, you ain’t never gon’ learn. When you defend the repetition of painful history, then it’s just a matter of being stubborn not to learn.

        • Macallanlover

          I don’t think anyone is suggesting repeating painful history, althoughI see some signs that is happening in our country today. The divisive hate seems to be coming from the other side, but it is hate again. Gonna bea long, hot summer brother.

  13. ClydeBoogie

    This just in Coach Freeze just said ” If anyone else has anymore proof of cheating at Ole Miss please, please don’t turn it in”. Also, disregard any lies he has told or will tell.

  14. WF Dawg

    Senator, your response is pitch perfect. Exactly what I want to say to the Ole Miss crowd.

  15. ASEF

    Hot flash to Ole Miss media:

    The NCAA doesn’t care if a player gets $800 either. They just suspend him if they find out. That’s why AJ sat and Georgia faced zero Level 1 (or equivalent) infractions over it.

    The NCAA cares when your compliance staff is hamstrung and/or incompetent. They really care when your coaches are breaking rules or encouraging boosters/players to break rules. Even when those coaches claim to not know the rules.

    Ole Miss wants to make this about the money amounts. The NCAA wants to make this about your people knowing basic member expectations. Guess who’s going to win?

    • 81Dog

      If Ole Miss people want to be mad at the NCAA, tell them to be mad that AU does this kind of thing every year and not only gets away with it, but sneers at the NCAA. To paraphrase R. Perry Sentell, Jr., “It hardly seems fair.”

  16. JCDAWG83

    Auburn has given the college sports world the template for dealing with the NCAA. Stonewall, deny, tell the NCAA to “prove it” and do not assist them in their investigation. Unless an athlete or booster comes out and admits the violation or some event occurs that thrusts a violation into the public eye due to a criminal act, the NCAA is pretty powerless to do much. The NCAA does not have subpoena powers and must rely on voluntary compliance with it’s investigations. Auburn knows if they don’t comply and no one talks, the NCAA is pretty much a toothless hound.

    Ole Miss is in trouble because their athlete and his family could not stay on the right side of the law. If the Tunsil clan had been able to get along and keep their mouths shut, nothing would have ever happened.

  17. Jared S.

    Hotty Toddy. Sounds like Black Bear Nation is royally pissed off. I don’t know who John Davis is or why anyone should care what he writes, but I’ve got news for him: he sounds like an idiot. Here’s an idea: quit breaking the rules (or do a better job hiding your indiscretions) and you won’t have to fume about how much time and money the NCAA spends investigating you.