Daily Archives: June 16, 2016

Today, in Baylor, a continuing series

It’s good to see more righteous indignation about what’s been enabled in Wac… oh, wait.

Fired Baylor coach Art Briles is ripping his former employer, accusing the school of wrongful termination and indicating he has no interest in settling a federal lawsuit filed against him and the university by a woman who was raped by a football player.

The criticism in a motion filed Thursday as part of the lawsuit. Briles says he wants a judge to assign him new attorneys and his personal legal team is demanding that Baylor turn over all its files in the sexual assault scandal that has gripped the Baptist university for months.

The letter says Briles “does not wish to settle the case,” contrary to what Baylor lawyers told the judge last week.

Briles’ petition says he met April 7 with Baylor attorneys and that they used information he shared to support his firing.
Gosh, you hope this doesn’t set back those plans to bring Briles back after a one-year suspension.
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21 Comments

Filed under Baylor Is Sensitive To Women's Issues, See You In Court

Have and have-nots, SEC edition

Here’s a slideshow from Al.com, ranking the conference football programs by revenues.

Too lazy to click through?  Okay, here’s the list:

  1. Alabama, $97.02 million
  2. Tennessee, $94.37 million
  3. Auburn, $86.74 million
  4. Georgia, $86.71 million
  5. LSU, $86.31 million
  6. Florida, $74.72 million
  7. Arkansas, $66.17 million
  8. Texas A&M, $62.19 million
  9. South Carolina, $59.76 million
  10. Ole Miss, $53.39 million
  11. Missouri, $37.89 million
  12. Kentucky, $35.49 million
  13. Mississippi State, $31.3 million
  14. Vanderbilt, $27.4 million

My first thought on seeing that is to wonder what in the hell has Tennessee been doing with all that money – keep in mind that according to the article that gross was good enough for a whopping $70 million profit.  (In case you’re wondering, Georgia managed a $60.6 million profit.)

Other than that, it’s a pretty expected spread.  It takes money to win big.  Surprised?

20 Comments

Filed under It's Just Bidness, SEC Football

Hines Ward, scratching the coaching itch

You wanted to see it.  Behold!

4 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

Today, in greatness: a follow up

Again, one of those couldn’t-resist-posting items:

127 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Political Wankery

“We’re still using Etch A Sketch.”

The NFL has embraced the latest technology, but college football hasn’t.

While the NFL, which enters the third of a five-year sponsorship deal with Microsoft worth a reported $400 million that equips all 32 teams with Surface Pro tablets on the sideline and in the coaches’ box, will allow the use of video replay on the sideline during the preseason this year and Major League Baseball has a multi-year deal for the use of iPads in dugouts, the NCAA has been sorely behind when it comes to in-game technology.

High school football teams have embraced the latest technology, but college football hasn’t.

“I see high school teams in the state of Georgia that are replaying the previous series with their offensive line, with their backs, with their quarterback, on the sideline,” Muschamp said. “Certainly I think that’s something that would be beneficial for us. … To be able see a picture of a formation, and to be able to see a receiver split, to be able to see the split of an offensive tackle, all of those things are really critical to be able to do.

“Everything in pictures that you can draw up and be able to show a player that, it’s a much easier learning curve for a player as opposed to drawing it on a blackboard.”

Instead, welcome to the land of half-assed.

In February, the NCAA Football Rules Committee approved a proposal to allow electronic devices to be used for coaching purposes in the press box and locker room, but not on the sideline like in the NFL, during games beginning this fall. That proposal was approved a month later by the Playing Rules Oversight Panel, which in April, chose to delay implementation until 2017 after feedback from conference commissioners as to guidelines for consistency, cost and other issues.

“I think that’s part of the reason that the brakes were applied,” SEC commissioner Greg Sankey said earlier this month. “To say, ‘Let’s figure out exactly what might be implemented and how it can be implemented on an appropriately consistent basis.'”

All I can figure is that Sankey’s waiting for Microsoft to step up and offer him one of those sweet, sweet sponsorship deals.  In the meantime, enjoy the comedic stylings of SEC coaching.

Until some of the details are worked out, coaches are already searching for loopholes in how to maximize whatever technology ends up being implemented.

“I think that’s going to be one of those conversations that’s talked about the next couple of years,” Auburn coach Gus Malzahn said, “with the technology and where it’s going and what is going to be the plan moving forward in college football.”

As of now, a designated staffer or player could be in the locker room watching film and come to the sideline to relay information throughout a game. A quarterback could go to the locker room and watch film of the previous drive.

Bielema took that idea a step further.

“If we scored a touchdown our offensive unit could kind of just run into the locker room and grab a drink of water and maybe stay in there and watch a half a dozen plays, come back on the field before they’d be missed, which would be a huge, huge advantage,” Bielema said. “It’s the locker room. They just went in to use the facilities.

“I mean that’s the part of the SEC that I’ve begun to know. You’re going to take everything that you’ve given and kind of expand it a little bit.”

15 Comments

Filed under Science Marches Onward, SEC Football

Run the dang ball.

Here’s a pretty funky stat from last season.

Running Bulldogs: Georgia returns its two leading rushers from a year ago, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel. The two combined for 1,908 yards on the ground despite Chubb suffering a season-ending knee injury on the first play against Tennessee on Oct. 10. That’s more than 38 FBS teams had for the entire season. They also accounted for over 76 percent of Georgia’s rushing game.

Imagine what they could do this year with a healthy Chubb and a consistent offensive line.

18 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Stats Geek!

2016 SEC non-con schedules

Berry Tramel breaks them down here.

This season, only one SEC school plays two P5 non-conference opponents: “Georgia, often a scheduling renegade, plays both North Carolina and Georgia Tech this season.”

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Filed under SEC Football