Monthly Archives: June 2016

Title IX in reverse

What if the problem isn’t that Title IX hamstrings schools from complying with funding equality between the sexes, but that the NCAA hamstrings Title IX?

The NCAA limits the number of scholarships schools can award in each sport. For example, men’s basketball teams in Division I can only award 13 scholarships per year, while women’s teams can award 15. Under Title IX, schools are supposed to spend athletic aid dollars in proportion to each gender’s participation; an unexplained disparity of more than one percentage point indicates a possible violation of the law. If a school sees that it’s underfunding women’s athletic aid, however, it can’t just freely hand out more scholarships to female athletes—that would exceed the NCAA’s per-sport scholarship caps, which would result in association sanctions, including the possible loss of more scholarships in the future.

In other words: the NCAA is potentially limiting opportunities for female athletes, and making it harder for schools to follow federal law.

Take Notre Dame, which says it is “fully funded” in women’s sports, meaning that it is giving out all of the scholarships it possibly can under the association’s caps. Nevertheless, the school has a three percent equity gap—that is, there is a three-point difference between the rate of women’s participation in sports and the rate they are awarded athletic scholarship dollars.

If Notre Dame didn’t have to follow NCAA rules, the school says, it would offer more scholarships to female athletes.

“With respect to financial aid, all 13 of our women’s intercollegiate athletic programs receive the NCAA maximum number of scholarship dollars,” Notre Dame senior associate athletic director for business Jill Bodensteiner wrote to VICE Sports in an email. In a follow-up email, she wrote, “The NCAA limits do have an impact. And yes, we would try to be ‘fully funded’ in all sports if they were increased”—as long as increases didn’t further give an advantage to Notre Dame’s sponsored men’s sports.

It’s not just Notre Dame. In 2013-14, Florida State had an 8.5-point equity gap. It would have cost the Seminoles roughly $681,000 more in women’s athletic scholarships to make things even—an amount the school’s athletic department almost certainly could have afforded.

Tough luck, ladies.  Sure helps the schools’ bank accounts, though.  Which is the point, of course.

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Filed under The NCAA

This is what free market value looks like.

Jim Brown, one of the all-time greatest players in American football, today settled with video games maker Electronic Arts (EA) to the tune of $600,000, after he alleged that the company used his likeness in its Madden NFL games series without his consent.

Quite a bit more than the college kids got.

(Via one of my favorite h/ts ever.  He ought to know.)

15 Comments

Filed under It's Just Bidness, The NCAA

More schedule talk

David Ching has this to say about Georgia’s 2016 slate:

Final analysis: SEC teams rarely play two Power 5 nonconference opponents in one fall, but that’s what the Bulldogs will do with UNC in the opener and rival Georgia Tech in the regular-season finale. That said, Georgia’s slate is not especially daunting. The Ole Miss-Tennessee stretch is the only spot on the entire schedule where the Bulldogs play consecutive scary games. Still, there are four or five contests that are anything but gimmes. The good news for Smart is that Georgia gets three challenging opponents (Tennessee, Auburn, Georgia Tech) at home. Further, aside from Ole Miss, Georgia’s other true SEC road games come against teams — Mizzou, South Carolina and Kentucky — that all fell short of bowl eligibility last year. However, the Bulldogs will play at Sanford Stadium just six times thanks to neutral-site games against UNC and Florida. ESPN’s Football Power Index rates Georgia’s schedule as the 16th-most difficult slate in the FBS, but that ranks eighth among SEC teams. By the conference’s lofty standards, this is a manageable first set of games for Smart & Co.

FPI bullshit aside, this lays out pretty nicely for the Dawgs.  If they can manage their way through the first five games with a winning record, the odds are pretty strong they’ll be headed towards at least a nine-win season.

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Filed under Georgia Football

Endorsement of the day

Art Briles is a big fan of Gus Malzahn.

Over the weekend, Kam Martin announced via Twitter that he had committed to play his college football for Gus Malzahn at Auburn.  The running back chose Auburn over another contender in TCU.

Malzahn and Briles are good friends who, prior to Briles’ dismissal in the wake of the sexual assault scandal in the football program, brainstormed together this offseason.  When Martin received a release from his BU National Letter of Intent, he turned to Briles for advice, with his former coach advising him that Auburn would be “a great fit.”

“He helped me — I still have a great relationship with him,” Martin told 247Sports.com. “He just told me Auburn is a great fit for me with Coach Gus Malzahn and his coaching staff. He said if I was going to Baylor and he was there, it would be the same type of vibe (as at Auburn).  [Emphasis added.]

Interesting choice of words there, especially since they’re second chance sister institutions.

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Filed under Auburn's Cast of Thousands

Barking up the wrong celebrity fan tree

With all due respect, Ed Aschoff, no, no, no and …

a1avy3zceaa-b0o

hell no.

18 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

Envy and jealousy, month of lists edition

CFN has its 1-128 rankings of college football coaches posted.  Its bit on Booch is classic.

37. Butch Jones, Tennessee Volunteers, 2013

Career Record: 71-44, School Record: 21-17

He’ll blow it.

Brevity is indeed the soul of wit.

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Filed under Envy and Jealousy

At least they got one.

Pro Football Focus lists its top 101 players in college football here.  It’s an interesting list, in that the site goes into extensive use of analytics to justify the selections.

If you take it seriously, then it’s a little depressing to see only one Georgia player there — Nick Chubb at No. 12.  For comparison’s sake, there are six SEC teams with more than one player.  And in terms of the schedule, note that Florida shows up with four players, while Tennessee and North Carolina each have three.

No, it’s not a be all and end all comparison.  Depth matters, obviously.  But if you’re a top tier SEC program that’s been chasing elite talent, it’s hard not to think it should show a little better on a list like this.

9 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Stats Geek!