An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of four-game suspension.

This is how an athletic director takes proactive steps to avoid having a season derailed.

Due to the recent increase in autograph demands of Louisville star quarterback Lamar Jackson and other student-athletes, the Cardinals will no longer be allowed to autograph items because of NCAA eligibility concerns.

“We decided to take this measure as more of a proactive approach to protect the eligibility of our student-athletes,” a Louisville spokesperson said in a statement provided to ESPN. “Furthermore, certain steps needed to be taken to insure that third parties were not benefitting commercially on the signatures of the student-athletes.”

There is no indication that Jackson or any other Louisville player violated NCAA rules regarding autographs or has been compensated for autographs, the spokesperson said. The decision was made because the autograph demand of players had increased after the recent success of the football team.

Gee, I wonder what might have inspired that call?

Louisville’s autograph ban decision was to ensure none of the Cardinals commit any NCAA violations — specifically in regard to NCAA bylaw 12.5.2.1, which has sidelined two of college football’s biggest stars in recent years.

In 2014, Georgia running back Todd Gurley received a four-game suspension from the NCAA for “accepting more than $3,000 from multiple individuals for autograph memorabilia and other items over a two-year period.”

Yeah, that’s what I thought.  Rocket science, for the win!

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19 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

19 responses to “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of four-game suspension.

  1. Hogbody Spradlin

    I can’t tell whether you’re giving Louisville credit for a nice cautious decision, or chiding McGarity and Richt for not thinking of this back then.

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  2. Gaskilldawg

    Proactive steps, moactive sleps! McGarity would LOVE ESPN to do a series comparing sizes of reserve funds. That’s what matters, you know.

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  3. Does anyone think that cretin from Rome was going to go through Greg McGarity to get items signed by TG3II? If Jackson or any other player gets approached to sign items for money, is this really going to prevent the player from doing it?

    Let’s get over it and allow these guys to trade on their name and likeness.

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  4. ugafidelis

    What might have been…

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  5. Bigshot

    What’s done in this car, doesn’t leave this car.

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  6. 86BONE

    BTW…what became of the deuche bag from Rome Ass Georgia?

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  7. Scorpio Jones, III

    Very smart of Louisville…I just wish they had some other player to use as an example. Like, Cam, maybe?

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  8. W Cobb Dawg

    “In 2014, Georgia running back Todd Gurley received a four-game suspension from the NCAA for “accepting more than $3,000 from multiple individuals for autograph memorabilia and other items over a two-year period.””

    Um, was that ever actually proven?

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    • Scorpio Jones, III

      Yep. As I remember it was actually quite a bit more than $3.000.

      Not that it matters.

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      • LamontSanford

        McGarity headed up the investigation and turned all of the proof over to the NCAA….I guess to ensure that lenient 4 game suspension.

        If he hadn’t been so thorough and forthcoming–The NCAA might have been forced to sit him a half game like Johnny Football.

        Smart.

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  9. 69Dawg

    How does the NCAA even begin to justify that rule. Are any of the high priced legal talent attacking it as a restraint of trade or hell just un-American.

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  10. DawgPhan

    I think that if UGA had done this they would have printed out all the screenshots of the ebay items, fedex’d them to the NCAA office, and put us on probation.

    oh wait, that is what they did. bummer.

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