Give him time.

Over at Pro Football Focus, Gordon McGuinness pitches how Georgia could be a CFP contenda in 2017.  He cites three factors, none of which are particularly controversial, but skips past something that I think is at least as important — improvement on the offensive line.  Strangely enough, he posts a graphic that’s validation of that.

eason

Look at what happened to Eason under pressure last season, compared with the rest of the time.  Contrary to what you might expect, not all of his pressure-related woes can be related to handling opposing blitzes; in fact, he handled blitz situations relatively well.

Line play steps up, you’ll get a more productive starting quarterback.  No wonder Jim Chaney’s crossing his fingers that Sam Pittman can work a little magic this season.

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24 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Stats Geek!

24 responses to “Give him time.

  1. Otto

    I want to see stats on shotgun/pistol vs under center.

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    • I’m curious to see our running stats pistol/I formation. Looked like we were getting some momentum running from the pistol by the end of last year, however I haven’t seen our coaching staff stay consistent with anything we do from game to game.

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      • Dawgtired

        “…stay consistent with anything we do from game to game.”

        I’ve thought the same. I can only hope that their decision to abandon what seemed to be working was due to adjustments by opposing defenses and not the coaches pig-headed determination to force an offense that’s not working.

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  2. addr

    Interesting, but it makes sense. If your quarterback is getting pressured in non-blitzing situations, that means he’s trying to complete a pass with everyone else on the defense trying to stop him – a tough task for any quarterback, much less a freshman.

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  3. MGW

    I’d like to see how many of those pressures came against a 4 or fewer man rush, and how the line did relative to the national average in those situations.

    Seems like the best tell of a line’s pass blocking quality… or really the baseline of what you’d call a “adequate” line. Can you win when you have the numbers advantage?

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    • Irwin R. Fletcher

      I would think the ‘blitzed’ would be bringing more than your down linemen and ‘not blitzed’ would be the other.

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      • MGW

        Yes, but that stat up there doesn’t show what % of time someone put pressure on him during those snaps, just QB performance when blitzed and not.

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      • Sherlock

        The traditional definition for blitz is rushing more than 4 players.

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        • MGW

          …. thanks for that. Anyhow, I’m asking what % of the time teams actually put pressure on him with 3-4 man fronts or “non-blitz”, if you will. Not what Eason’s stats were in those situations.

          i.e. not many people pressure/knockdown/etc. Bama’s QB without blitzing. More occur against other teams. What are those percentages? What is the average? Where did UGA fit in there? How the QB does in those situations is another stat that is already spelled out above.

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  4. AutomaticDawg

    Wonder how we compared with the SEC and Natl average for throws under pressure? Because if we are at or above average on throws under pressure (doubtful), it may be Eason who needs the most work.

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  5. AthensHomerDawg]8

    “If you probe a football fan deep enough, he or she will probably say something like, “quit bothering me, I know a blitz when I see it.” I suspect that there is a technical definition of blitz used within football teams that still has a very specific meaning although it could be used differently from team to team. I also think there probably was once, at the start of the use of the term, a specific definition. The Wikipedia article on the blitz claims that the term was originally used to refer only to a team rushing seven men at the quarterback. Rushing six was called a “red-dog” after a linebacker named Donald Nesbit “Red Dog” Ettinger who played for the University of Kansas, the New York Giants, and in the Canadian Football League. Great nickname! This has the ring of truth to me. It fits most of our descriptions. If you rush seven men, you’re absolutely using a player who is not a defensive lineman because there are at most five of those, you’re likely to be blitzing with more men than are protecting the quarterback, and you’re by definition sending more than four rushers.

    So, if you want to be a stickler the next time you’re watching football with a bunch of friends, correct them when they shout about their team blitzing. Tell them that wasn’t a blitz, it was a red-dog! They duck the plate of hot wings that’s inevitably going to come flying at your face.”

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    • You’re right, in that I never really thought about defining it. But I know it when I see it! I would loosely call a blitz having more men in the box at the LOS than the O. Risk/Reward.

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  6. Rugbydawg79

    Ah Ha and then you can add stunts to the mix

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  7. Reading the table is very informative. It’s really what you would typically think about QB play. Reading between the lines would indicate Eason was at his worst against pressure from fewer than 6 men – rush 3, 4, or 5 and drop 6, 7, or 8 into coverage (man vs. zone doesn’t matter). I would think every QB’s efficiency drops when his protection can’t withstand a rush of fewer men than can be blocked (5 OLs vs. 3, 4, or 5 pass rushers) because the coverage can outman the receivers especially when you keep running backs in to block. When his linemen picked up the pass rush, Eason was pretty darn good for a true freshman. A 91 passer rating puts him in a class with Russell Wilson (92.6), Andy Dalton (91.8), and Alex Smith (91.2) and ahead of Philip Rivers, Carson Palmer, Jameis Winston, and Eli Manning.

    Bottom line, the kid is talented. If he can build on the learnings of this season and make better decisions (mainly to throw more on time) under pressure, he could make the next couple of years fun to watch.

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  8. John

    Those numbers actually made me feel a little better. That isn’t normally how I feel after looking at numbers.

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  9. Russ

    Just think how good Fromm will be behind that improved line, amirite?

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  10. Dawg Vegas

    Eason may improve his numbers for when he faces pressure, but you’re right to put the real focus for improvement on the O line.

    Look at the Super Bowl as an example. Brady, now considered by many as the GOAT, was ineffective when he was pressured and hit. Once the Falcons d was exhausted and Brady had protection, he carved up Atlanta’s coverage.

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  11. Macallanlover

    I believe we will see better line play in 2017, hard not to, but I also hope Eason gets better against pressure, Lambert never did. Understandable that it has a measurable impact on stats, but there is no shortage of QBs who are outstanding in 7 on 7s, and “no touching” the QBs situations (G Day). It is hard to find the Aaron Rodgers/Baker Mayfield guys who turn things to chicken salad when the heat is on. Feel there needs to be more “live” action for QBs and less time wearing the black/green jerseys during scrimmages. Practice like you want to play, occasionally, it applies to QBs too.

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  12. Mayor

    I’m glad the above post was written and the stats included because they validate what I saw with my own eyes without actually knowing the numbers. When a D rushes 4 and plays pass D with 7 the receivers usually are going to be better covered. When a team can get pressure only rushing 4 D-Linemen that is the worst situation for the QB–max coverage downfield yet still being pressured. The other teams on UGA’s schedule last season saw it on tape and they all did the same thing to the Dawgs most of the time–rushed 4 down linemen. Since the Georgia OL was so…how shall I put it…ineffective at pass blocking the D was getting into Eason’s face a lot while the receivers were well covered. I wish I had a buck for every time an interior D-Lineman knocked one of the Georgia O-Linemen back into the pocket so Eason couldn’t step into the throw and/or Eason had to run for his life to one side or the other–it seemed a constant on passing downs particularly. Give the kid a break. We all saw what happened to Brady when the Falcons got a good pass rush on Brady and we also saw what happened when they stopped getting to Brady. It will be the same with Eason if we can just get some O-Linemen that pass block effectively. Now if we can just figure a way to keep Kirby from f*cking up at the end of the game………

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  13. JCDAWG83

    Georgia is the perpetual “next year” team. Every off season we read some “expert” picking Georgia to be their dark horse playoff or championship team. I’ve had enough of the happy talk, I’m ready to see something on the field.

    Until we are actually winning games that matter and going to championship games, I’ll watch and pull for the Dawgs but I’m way past getting excited about upcoming seasons. It’s been 36 years since the last national championship, some of the players on that team have grandchildren. I think I’ve heard about Georgia being in a position to “win it all” every season since then. To paraphrase an old saying “fool me once, shame on you, fool me 35 times, shame on me”.

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