“We’re putting the cart before the horse when we pay a coach more than a teacher in the classroom.”

If you were serious about that, random Alabama legislator, you’d be aiming your bill at state universities, too.  Those markets ain’t gonna un-free themselves, you know.

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15 Comments

Filed under Political Wankery, Whoa, oh, Alabama

15 responses to ““We’re putting the cart before the horse when we pay a coach more than a teacher in the classroom.”

  1. Uglydawg

    If a coach is bringing in the $$$$ for the school, I can understand it. But the point is taken..schools exist first for academics and education. Sports are (supposed to be) extra-curricular. Ask someone what comes to mind when you say, “The University of Alabama” and I’m betting almost all will say, “football” or something related to it. Same with UGA, and a lot of other schools.I don’t know if it’s really that bad of a thing.

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  2. Got Cowdog

    When the teacher gets 96,000 pupils to regularly pay to attend a lecture on a Saturday afternoon, then gets a big TV contract to broadcast the lectures nationally, we might have apples to apples. Right now it sounds like we have apples to sour grapes.

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    • 83Dawg

      So which Alabama High School has a 96,000 seat stadium and a big TV contract?

      Right now it sounds like we have someone who didn’t read the link or the OP.

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      • Got Cowdog

        That would be me, yes. I’m so ashamed.

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        • Got Cowdog

          At the risk of making myself out to be an idiot again; and feel free to correct this line of thinking:
          The disparity between College Football Coaching salaries and that of the university level educator is easier to justify (for me) based on my non sequitur comment above. Also, Are CFB Coaching salaries not paid wholly from the AA Budget with no Federal, State, or Local funding?
          The article mentioned principals salaries. I do not think there is a more difficult job in education than that of a high school principal. My thought is this: If the coaches salary is paid from school (Tax based) funding sources and disregarding tenure, then no. The coach should not be compensated at a higher level than a principal of equal tenure from taxpayer dollars.
          On the other hand, a successful coach with an involved and affluent booster system can and likely will receive bonuses that could increase his net income. Since this does not involve mandated public funding I would say, “No problem”.

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          • Got Cowdog

            Fleshing out the thought, a coach’s base salary should not be more than that of a non coaching teacher at the same level. He or she should receive a stipend determined by the school district to compensate for the extracurricular activity

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          • Macallanlover

            You are right about this, it is not even close to an apples to apples discussion. Putting a cap on coaches’ salaries would do nothing at all for teaching salaries. Nor is there any relationship between their tenures, or accountability/measurement of success. I do feel the educators will still be standing when the air goes out of the “sports balloon/bubble”.

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          • Napoleon BonerFart

            You’re correct. Most high school coaches make the standard teacher salary with a small (<$5k) stipend for coaching football (or whatever sport). Some schools use private donations to bolster the salary of the coaches.

            However, there are a few schools like Colquitt County or Buford, who pay the football coach well over $100k of taxpayer money. And the elected school board has approved the contracts. They are the ones who would/should be held accountable for spending priorities.

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    • dawgfan

      I read another post today that said that Willie Martinez is guaranteed $432,000 per year as the new defensive back coach at Cincinnati. I wonder how many professors there make even one fourth that?

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  3. Bright Idea

    Ford would freak out if he saw Georgia salaries. If calculated by the hour high school coaches are one heck of a bargain. Along with winning comes a lot of mission work that principals and legislators would never touch. Of course mission work is not the charge of public schools, or is it? If you cut coaching pay, might as well reinvest it in the prison system. They’ll need it.

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    • Sherlock

      The last two sentences of this post are the most underrated comment on this board in at least a year. The ability to play sports at the school is the key thing that keeps a significant number of students attending school and trying in class in order to remain academically eligible. Kids raised by single mothers look for a father figure. They can find it in a coach or on the street.

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  4. Bigshot

    I’m a retired teacher. I hope he has enjoyed his time in office.

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  5. Will Trane

    Before I hit the “that” link I knew this was an elite Democrat. Bingo, “I 9 “, for such a poorly informed, poorly educated idiot!
    First, let’s talk about education in America. It is the most highly subsidized industry in America with a substandard rate of return. Maybe you do not think so, but the industry is flush with money. Check your 2017 ad valorem tax bill. Look at the assessment for school taxes. Get in your vehicle and ride through in town in Georgia. From Class A to 7A, tell me what those physical school facilities look like. Modern, state of the art. Now look at the facilities of the private sector…like manufacturing or agriculture. They do not even compare.
    Then take a peek at the UGA campus, Tech, Emory, Mercer, Georgia Southern, and etc. How many businesses look like that. But remember those business are funding all of that to a large degree. Plus, look at page two of your tax return. Focus on those refundable and nonrefundable tax credits. They are funding higher education. When I came thru UGA none of that was available. That is okay.
    Those student loans. Largest federal debt group in the USA. Doubt if many of those loans will get repaid. Think how those loans originate at the federal level to fund those campuses.
    I can remember awhile back an AJC article about the salaries of two south Georgia coaches. Both had won state titles. They were some of the highest paid in the state. Hell, one of those held a PhD from Vandy.
    You know what I thought he was under compensated. Both made huge contributions to their local communities.
    Take a look at the number of kids who signed LOI a few days ago. High school coaches do more to build goodwill in communities than most pastors! There is a reason we hear the phrase “Friday night lights”.
    I think high school football is a tremendous sport. Perhaps only exceeded by collegiate football. I watched 2 pro games this past seasons. The Falcon’s last two. Conclusion. Nothing changes with that team. Losers. It is a disease in metro Atlanta. They can build all the stadiums they want. Go to Birmingham, they could change your luck!
    How much influence did those coaches out of Hoover had on young men. Overall a lot.
    Back to salaries. High school teaches in Georgia are some of the last on a defined benefit plan. And they receive some of the highest insurance benefits. Compare that to the private sector.
    I’d be very careful proposing a bill in the current or future legislature in Georgia. it has as much of chance of going thru as the Falcons winning a super bowl.
    Finally, let the market set the rate. Historically in the business world that has worked. It gets too high local school boards and communities can decide.
    We sure as hell do not need another damn bill or law telling communities and families what they need or should have. Frankly too much of government has interfered with the private business sector in the past 30 – 40 years.

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