Just when you thought it was safe to come out of the dorm room…

Athens-Clarke County’s finest strike again.

Georgia receiver Riley Ridley was arrested Saturday night on a charge of possessing less than an ounce of marijuana, according to the Athens-Clarke County jail web site.

Ridley was arrested at 10:05 p.m. on Saturday, and bailed out on $1,000 bond at 12:32 a.m. on Sunday. The Athens-Clarke County Police Department is listed as the arresting agency.

A rising sophomore, Ridley had 12 catches for 238 yards and two touchdowns last season. He is expected to compete for a starting position this year.

A marijuana arrest that is a misdemeanor usually brings a one-game suspension, per UGA’s student-athlete handbook. Georgia opens the season against Appalachian State.

I feel safer already.

***********************************************************************

UPDATE:  And lest we forget…

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50 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, Georgia Football

50 responses to “Just when you thought it was safe to come out of the dorm room…

  1. Granthams replacement

    His brother did the same thing but……

    Like

  2. Chi-town Dawg

    Our guidelines are tucked away on pages 145-146 of the manual with very detailed and precise instructions/penalties spelled out. My bet is Alabama’s entire manual is less than 100 pages with lots of discretion for the staff to impose penalties. Same penalty for less than 1 ounce or substantially more – another example of the Georgia Way highlighted in black and white.

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  3. Jimmy and AACCP have the AJC on speed dial.

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    • Every media outlet covering Georgia football reported the story within 15 minutes of each other.

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      • Argondawg

        I know several of ACCPD who won’t even bother with less than an ounce unless there is some other charge to go with it. It’s just not worth the hassle. It’s a personal use tax in all honesty. Ridley obviously didn’t get one of those guys

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        • Irwin R. Fletcher

          Anyone see why he was searched in the first place? If possession is the only charge, I’m trying hard to figure out how an officer had ability to search him. Unless he had it rolled in a swisher sweet…in which case, the officer needs some common sense.

          Can we get a public records request on the bonus system at the ACCPD?

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  4. justin houston

    Well I did it before the NFL draft 😂

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  5. I wonder if UGA beat writers just have a pre written template where they just switch out the time and names. APD gotta APD…its as reliable as the Georgia way and the reality of this post appearing every off season. Sigh….

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  6. PTC DAWG

    No victim…no crime in my book…

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    • Walt

      Agreed, and it’s not a performance enhancing drug

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    • “Good people don’t smoke marijuana.”

      Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III

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    • Sherlock

      To me, the problem is not that it is just a victimless “crime”; it is that marijuana is safer than alcohol and causes infinitely less social problems, yet Baby Boomers and Baptists still will not STFU.

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      • 69Dawg

        Don’t blame the Baby Boomers, we are the MF’s that started the general use of MJ. Blame the damn hypocritical politicians that smoked it in college and now say they didn’t inhale. LMFAS. If the politicians would let the people vote on it it would be legalized. It has only failed in one state so far.

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        • Sherlock

          Boomers and older are the only group that has 50+% opposition to legalization. Their hypocrisy on the issue is one of the thousands of reasons as to why they are the worst generation of human beings in history.

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          • doiknowu

            “Boomers and older” are two groups, not one. Or did you just pull this data out of your ass? Here’s a quote from a Pew research post in 2016: “A majority of Boomers (56%) also support legalization, up from just 17% in 1990.” They gone on to say that “Even when you break down Americans by age groups, every demographic from Millennials (18- to 35-year-olds) to Baby Boomers (52- to 70-year-olds) supports legalization.”

            Only one group opposes legalization — the so-called “Silent” generation (71-88-year-olds) oppose legalization 59% against to 33% in favor. ”

            How about this one from Cannabis Business Executive in 2015 : “Some 68 percent of Millennials, 52 percent of Gen Xers and 50 percent of Baby Boomers, those 51 to 69, support legalization.”

            Looks like it’s maybe just the “older” that’s opposed. Maybe you just don’t like Boomers, but it’d probably help your case if you stopped making shit up.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Macallanlover

              I feel you you give way too much credit to “no shit” in assuming he would be able to reach the correct conclusion even if all available research information were in front of him. While he is wrong that Boomers are the worst of the age groups, as a Boomer who supports legalization of marijuana, I readily admit that I hold Boomers primarily responsible for the current condition of America (we may not have been in control when things began to change for the worse, but we were in positions of power when changes should have been implemented.)

              There are no actual “facts” of whom will be in charge/blamed when a collapse occurs and the autopsy is performed because we are simply forecasting at this point, but I will put my money on the Millennials. They seem the least likely to recognize, or admit, we have the problem, and also seem to progressing slowly toward the maturity of stepping up. Seem to be mostly whiners and entitlement babies with their hand out and not helping to pitch in to find a solution. Surprisingly, there are many on here who think everything has been moving along nicely and putting our foot on the pedal is what is needed. As a Grumpy Old Man, I admit that I will not feel badly when that group gets hammered, only sorry they will take so many down with them.

              Legalization of marijuana seems a no-brainer decision to me but it is neither a solution for, or cause of, the bigger issues we face and should be spending our time on.

              But the political issues aren’t a reason for UGA not reviewing and revising the bad policies of Adams. UGA is being stepped on by virtually everyone for adopting a “zero tolerance” policy while other athletes in our conference, and nationally, face no punishment, significant or otherwise. I don’t see any generational group opposing a change from UGA administration on college students getting a warning/counseling on a misdemeanor offense at this level…maybe 5-10% of the donor base would write a letter or call, but low resistance, imo.

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              • Legalization with a significant “Sin Tax” (if spent properly) would go a long way to fixing our broken education system and hopefully leave the group after the Millennials in a better position to fix whatever they wrecked.

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                • Macallanlover

                  Oh, it would be heavily taxed for sure. And you are right, the money could be put to use while the jobs to those who sell the product would pay income taxes, unlike the gangs who currently profit from it. But that is the problem, if they tax it too much, the sales would still be done by the pusher man. But better to have a legal alternative.

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          • 69Dawg

            The Olders saved your sorry ass from speaking German so cut them some slack.

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            • DoubleDawg1318

              We were never going to be speaking German. No way Germany successfully crosses the Atlantic in force.

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              • Cojones

                With sympathizers already giving them a haven in S.Am., not so sure they couldn’t have set up shop and attacked from there.

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        • Gaskilldawg

          I support the legalization of marijuana wholeheartedly. That said, I am pessimistic that the legislature will ever decriminalize it because there is a huge law enforcement industry making tons of money from mj. Private probation and private prisons must have a steady flow of people convicted of nonviolent crimes in order to generate revenue, and cities and counties count on fine money for budgets.

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          • Yup. This. Private prisons, plus its an easy way to keep poor people incarcerated. War on Drugs was Nixon’s way to just jail people that opposed him (college hippies and minority voters).

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        • Cojones

          Know a lot of people (retired business owners, scientists as teachers, researchers and consultants, current business owners) and other old farts who have cookouts, drink beer/liquor and smoke ganja regularly. We discuss what we hear and read of research into it’s usage and will be the first ones to alert communities to anything that diminishes character or health once we ever hear of research that proves so. Two of our group are renowned plant taxonomists and ecologists in the Southeast, therefore, they are in the know constantly concerning new plant findings. The main reason you don’t hear about very much research on ganga turns out to be wholly related to funding that has been cut drastically for years by Congress. We think it’s because politicized weed goes off the funding list when negative data concerning it’s usage can’t be compiled.

          This group thinks we will have legalized pot throughout the US when Ken Starr appears on “Dancing with the Stars” .

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  7. St. Johns Dawg

    Used to absolutely believe this would mean Ridley misses actual game time because Richt made it clear he didn’t want the players smoking marijuana … Now thinking I will wait and see what Kirby might figure out for punishment. Probably will depend on who in the receiver corps steps up in spring and August practices.

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  8. John Denver is full of shit...

    If only the ajc would cover the arrests of similar instances of UGA frat bros for the sake of perspective.

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  9. Arrests for pot are ridiculously stupid and pointless. But oh well.

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  10. Legalities aside, why a world class athlete would breath that shit into his lungs is beyond me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Argondawg

      And why would a world class athlete over work his liver with alcohol? He feels better the next morning than the guy who put down a 12 pack.

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    • Chris

      Smoke ’em if you got ’em.

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    • Debby Balcer

      Amen knowing someone battling lung cancer I really don’t know why anyone would smoke anything.

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      • Cojones

        Bake cookies and give them to the cancer victim to bolster appetite after chemotherapy, such that the patient will be able to keep physical strength up through treatment. Ups their chances quite markedly. Unfortunately, my neighbor thinks he is allergic to pot in that he became ill after smoking it for years and, if he is allergic, cookies could affect him negatively. He has smoked cigarettes all his life and his lungs are the only thing not impaired by his prostate cancer that went to bone cancer. As his caregiver, I have shed tears over his dilemma, but won’t do anything that he doesn’t “okay” ahead of time.

        Go score a baggie and bake some cookies for your friend. Those precious moments of life that are left can possibly be increased. If those were your life moments, what would you do?

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        • Debby Balcer

          Fortunately first chemo brought no nausea. Second chemo round is next week. They live in Colorado so if nausea meds don’t work the Dr may prescribe. It is small cell lung cancer so definitely caused by smoking.

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  11. The Georgia Way

    Yes!

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  12. Russ

    At least Sallee is highlighting the absurdity of our rule…Or Bama’s. Take your pick.

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    • 1smartdude

      What’s wrong with the Alabama policy? How has it been a detriment to the team, the individual or society? It doesn’t seem the rule is causing any problems with the team being successful. If you look at the Williams case, he’s gotten a college education, a handful of rings, and will soon be a millionaire in the NFL. Thinking the discipline of a few college football players is going to have an impact on bong sales in America is asinine. Now flip the question. How does the UGA policy effect those same things. It’s pretty easy to say it does. Negativity.

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  13. ASEF

    American politics has become the performance art of maintaining an illusion in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary. 1984, but as a farce rather than a drama.

    And college football and politics enjoy a lot of overlap.

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  14. Spike

    I dunno.. He knew the rules.. He choose to break them.

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    • 92 grad

      This is where the debate gets derailed. If you’re a gifted athlete and student and your free ride is contingent on a list of rules you just follow the rules. I want MJ to be legal and I want to see common sense prevail when policy is ratified, but, people need to do what they’re supposed to do.

      He agreed to the terms of his scholarship and now appears to have broken a rule. If I lose my drivers license, I can’t work, therefore I do what I need to do to keep my license.

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  15. Spike

    Oops “..CHOSE..” My bad there..

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  16. Russ

    Interesting contrast between this case and Trent Thompson case.

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  17. Derek Dooley 2.0

    This is unacceptable. We brought CKS in so these things never materialize. He knows the Process. These players aren’t supposed to be getting caught. If they are, the PD is supposed to already be reporting straight to BM. We can’t reach the next level if we can’t keep star players eligible. That’s why we needed a change.

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