Eat, drink and spend broadcast revenue

Reading this article, I think the SEC grand poobahs Seth Emerson interviewed about cord-cutting mistook the question “Should the SEC be worried?” for “Is the SEC worried?”

There’s a difference, which they’ll realize in a decade or so.

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22 Comments

Filed under ESPN Is The Devil, SEC Football

22 responses to “Eat, drink and spend broadcast revenue

  1. Im all for cord cutting but I tried PS Vue and its interface totally sucked compared to my nice Comcast X1 guide. It felt like I was going backwards in time and not forwards…

    And you cant record ESPN on Slingtv to that’s worthless for CFB fans…

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    • The other Doug

      It’s worth it to you to pay the cable company for their product, but more and more people are deciding that they don’t need or want traditional cable. Programming guides can be changed and a lot of people don’t watch sports.

      ESPN and cable buggy whip manufacturers pointing out that there is no future in automobiles because they’re not reliable, belch smoke, and are noisy.

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  2. Thanks for posting this Senator. I thought something was missing from the AD’s responses that didn’t coincide with the ramifications of the changes in how games will be watched in the future and how those changes might affect revenue.

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  3. Athens Dog

    Heads in the sand. They will also realize it a decade from now when the upper deck at Sanford has a tarp over it to make it look better on TV

    Liked by 1 person

    • sniffer

      Athens, no one knows where all this will go. If the money flow slows and access to game broadcast is diminished, attendance may be the preferred method of participation. Currently, I have a choice how I want to watch UGA v AppSt. Home or live. In a few years, I might not have the same options. This happens if the cost of broadcasting a marginal game is too expensive and not profitable. Mickey will make the call and it may make attendance popular again.

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      • Athens Dog

        I think it’s more generational. Throw in Adams policy on family ties. Many, many of my friends children went out of state. The out of state students that Adams wanted have no loyalty. But I agree, maybe it goes the other way. I’m so old I remember when only one or two games were televised.

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  4. dawgfan

    Upgraded internet to 100 mbps yesterday. I’m cancelling my overpriced and seldom watched Direct TV today.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Macallanlover

      Can your router deliver that speed? I was in a market which had that speed, or higher, but was told the router (at least five years ago) could only handle 30 mbps. I am sure better routers are available now but that seems like quite a leap forward. I am not in a market now where that is an opportunity, but just curious about the “top end” in this race for speed.

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      • hassan

        Good point…the speeds that are advertised by ISP’s are the max speeds possible. Your equipment and actual available bandwidth play a huge part in what you can actually realize. Your speed is only as good as the weakest link in the chain (or only as fast as the slowest link I should say).

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      • dawgfan

        I checked it this morning and I was getting upload and download speed of 57 mbps in the center of my house where the new router is located. I’m not a techie but I’ve been told that will handle several devices, games, and streaming at the same time. Sorry for the late response.

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      • dawgfan

        By the way, a new router with the new service and I already know it has much better range than my old one.

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    • Faulkner

      The speed advertised is max speed. As well, make sure your toys can handle 5ghz which is what they will need to take advantage of the speed. Right now only my tablet and cell can do it. My older flat screens with built in Wi-Fi can’t. That shouldn’t be a problem with newer TVs especially the 4k’s.

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      • dawgfan

        Early yesterday evening a few hours after installation I got an upload speed of 119 while at the same time got got a download speed of 53. Installer said it can vary depending on a number of factors. Again, I’m not an expert, but I’m told that 25 mbps is more than enough for most purposes. It will be just the wife and I with Netflix and new Roku streaming stick. Going to try Sling, got a free 30 day trial with the Roku. My son is home for the summer so maybe he can figure it out. Thanks for the information.

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  5. I never thought I would cut the cord but I am a few months from it. Paying such a ridiculous price for hundreds of channels that I don’t watch or care about is annoying me.

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    • southernlawyer11

      Hey, you could be me. We have Xfinity cable and have slowly tacked on many of the subscriptions that cord cutters employ. Just taking it on both ends. It’s not worth fighting if you know what I mean
      #marriage

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  6. southernlawyer11

    Future looks interesting for sure:
    On the live attendance front, the entire experience of attending a game is going to have to be tweaked and, in an almost inverse of TV moving from packaged to a la carte, will have to be served up on an all-you-can-eat platter to compete with….life. The future will have the fan simply paying to show up with nothing but the shirt on his back to a tent on a grassy knoll with a television package, a cooler of beer and food ready and waiting. A parking solution or some other type of uber’esque invention will have to take hold. Families with 2 working spouses and kids are not going to spend time and money on things that are a hassle going forward. I suspect that many of the older generations are not as different in mindset as they may think, rather its simply that when they started these traditions things weren’t such a hassle. Attending a big time college football game will become even more of an upper crust activity as it will switch to a completely premium / lifestyle experience that costs quite a bit of money.

    The lower south side between the 30s will probably be all club style, wide chairback seats with arm rests and hold 2/3rds of what they currently seat there. The idea of having anything other than crystal clear tablet streaming on all 90,000 phones within 1 square mile will be obsolete. Between catching other games / replays on your phones, connectivity / TVs everywhere, the tailgate experience will also be brought inside the stadium in the form of beer gardens and common spaces. Traditional seating will continue to be eaten to accommodate this type of activity.

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    • The new baseball and NFL stadiums are already there. They are destinations providing fewer seats but more luxury.

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      • southernlawyer11

        Exactly. Which is kind of why I don’t understand why these ADs think they need to wait and see… about EVERYTHING. The future stadium experience will basically be like watching the game at a Pub/Bar/Lounge but instead of having a band playing in the background you’ll have football players smashing heads.

        You will see the controlled access boundaries expand so that a kid could go do XYZ kid activity (babysitting?) while mom and dad are watching the game and/or drinking craft beer under a tree that is now within a controlled perimeter.

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    • JCDAWG83

      I think that will be the first response from the schools. Whether or not it works remains to be seen. The smaller, more exclusive, higher priced crowd model is still really tied to the television/corporate money supply. The NFL, MLB, etc. high priced luxury model relies on corporations to buy up the luxury tickets not the average fan. The tv money also props up the smaller attendance numbers. The number of empty seats at pro sport events shows that actual attendance does not determine profitability.

      If the cable cutting and exodus from broadcast television continues, I’m not sure the schools can charge enough to make up for the loss of tv revenue. I don’t know for sure but I don’t see a lot of corporations stepping up to pay the kind of money they pay for NFL luxury boxes for college games. I really don’t see a large number of even the higher income alumni being willing to spend low to mid five figure sums to attend 6 or 7 home games at their school.

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  7. Doggoned

    Already have cut cord and make do with streaming (Sling, Netflix, Amazon, Acorn and a number of free apps, plus a rare switch to local broadcast channels for a couple of UGA games. No DVR available for ESPN is a pain, and the whole process is a little more trouble than cable, but I pay a lot less and only for what I want to watch. Feels right to me. Don’t expect to ever go back.

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  8. Mayor

    Look at the 2013 picture above the linked article. Think about how many of the coaches in that photograph are not at their jobs any more or not at the same job they had when that picture was taken. Metaphor for changes in the works?

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  9. Only reason I have TV, is spouse watches it. I cut the cord last year. Now cutting the cord to the net, that would be tough. Swapped one for the other. Would love to have spouse cut the cord—save quite a bit of $$$.

    Like

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