Workin’ for the man isn’t really a job.

Greg Sankey can be such a card.

Greg Sankey knew the exact amount of time between the end of the College World Series and the beginning of Southeastern Conference media days.

He knows because he was there in Omaha, Nebraska, on June 27 when Florida beat LSU to win the national championship. He knows because he was there, too, on Monday, stepping to the microphone to begin media days.

“We used to sing ‘Twelve Days of Christmas,’ ” Sankey joked in his opening address to reporters. “We’re working on ‘Twelve Days of Summer’ as a new song. It does go quickly.”

Chuckle, chuckle.

Remember, this is coming from the guy who said this week that the SEC is following the discussion on expanding the college football season an additional week, with its attendant price of shortening the period between the end of summer school and the start of fall camp.

Then again, Sankey’s joviality may stem from the reality that there ain’t really that much time now, anyway.

More than half of the league is beginning preseason camp in July, according to tentative dates that emerged this week.

The NCAA Division I Council abolished two-a-days this spring, a ruling that resulted in the addition of an extra week of camp. Schools can start seven days earlier than in previous years.

Some are using it. Others are not.

Practices are beginning as early as July 25 at Mississippi State and as late as Aug. 3 at Alabama…

… The Bulldogs don’t complete the second term of summer classes until Aug. 2-3, a week after camp is scheduled to start. LSU will have a short break — just two days — from the time summer school ends (July 27) to its reporting date of July 30. Drills begin July 31.

Coach Ed Orgeron purposely planned the schedule to allow his players to potentially return home before the grueling weeks of camp begin.

“I couldn’t push it any farther back,” he said. “Got to give the guys a couple of days off. We cannot push it back another week. That’s going to dig into our summer school time. We’re starting as early as we can.”

Two whole days to spend with the family.  Ed, you’re a real prince.

For Mullen, even starting as early as possible isn’t enough.  It seems the NCAA has left too much slack in the players’ schedule for his comfort.

The NCAA has made it mandatory that players receive one full day off per week during drills. Complete off days were not mandatory and were somewhat of a rarity in previous years.

Mullen, a previous member of the NCAA Division I Football Oversight Committee, is against a full day off. He’d like to see the policy tweaked to allow coaches to, say, teach a non-football class on players’ off days.

“Instead of sitting around a hotel on their back for the entire day, bring them in and have two hours of life skills,” he said.

Lazy sumbitches, sitting on their backs.  Good thing the coaches don’t treat them like they’re on a job.

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3 Comments

Filed under College Football

3 responses to “Workin’ for the man isn’t really a job.

  1. Coaches like Mullen are starting to make me wish the NFL would jump in with both feet into developmental league football. I wouldn’t watch it, but I would love to see these glorified PE teachers called college football coaches get slapped upside the head as their world gets turned upside down.

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  2. heyberto

    Two hours of Life skills you say Dan? Booch is laughing at you, sir.

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  3. Go Dawgs!

    The most interesting part of the article to me is that Alabama is starting fall camp last. Are we to take that to mean the best coach in the conference doesn’t think he has to have his guys locked up every single day from now until kickoff? I’d be interested to know if Alabama has a lot of “voluntary” non-voluntary stuff going on that keeps the players in Tuscaloosa or if they really get a break. Obviously, I know that their players have been there all summer lifting and doing work on their own … er… “on their own”… but I wonder if they’ve really got more time than the rest of the league. Because if that’s true and they’re still eating everyone’s lunch, then the rest of the coaches need to take a long hard look at easing up on the reins a little bit.

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