“But I understand the integrity of the rule [is being violated].”

Really, the hand wringing over the graduate transfer rule is comical.

What’s clear is that few players transfer to find a school with a strong graduate program in their desired area of study. Yes, that was, in fact, the impetus behind the initial legislation to open the door for graduates to transfer without penalty.

Nevertheless, interviews this summer with more than a dozen Power 5 coaches revealed none who were upset about the misappropriation of the original grad-transfer rules.

Of course not.  I’d like to think it’s because they know it’s hypocritical to restrict player movement while coaches can jump ship at a school without limit, but I know that’s a fantasy.

It’s because they all know they might be the one to benefit from it next.

More than 60 graduates switched schools at the FBS level in 2017.

Among the high-profile newcomers to August practice sessions are quarterbacks Max Browne (USC to Pitt), Brandon Harris (LSU to North Carolina), Malik Zaire (Notre Dame to Florida) and Shane Morris (Michigan to Central Michigan); receivers Freddy Canteen (Michigan to Notre Dame), Jeff Badet (Kentucky to Oklahoma) and Jalen Brown (Oregon to Northwestern); offensive tackle Aaron Cochran (Cal to Oklahoma State); defensive lineman Scott Pagano (Clemson to Oregon); and cornerback Shaq Wiggins (Louisville to Tennessee).

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15 Comments

Filed under College Football

15 responses to ““But I understand the integrity of the rule [is being violated].”

  1. Will Trane

    I would venture to say somewhere down the road those letters of intent will have a buyout clause.
    If they have an undergraduate and to transfer for another or masters, I have no problem.
    Here is what I think the NCAA should do. If a member accepts that player with remaining eligbilty they have to forfeit two on that years recruit limit or 85 man roster

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  2. sectionZalum

    shaq’s THIRD school!

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  3. Macallanlover

    Restrictions of graduate transfers beyond schools on a team’s immediate regular season schedule is wrong. And there is no justification to impose restrictions beyond that one exception. I agree with the one year period for undergrad transfers, but worry about the policies penalizing graduates, big difference to me.

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    • Restrictions of graduate transfers are wrong. The student-athlete has completed the requirements of the scholarship. He/she should be able to transfer freely to the school of his/her choice. The student-athlete should be able to enjoy the same benefit any other graduate receives.

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  4. 69Dawg

    To be able to restrict the transfer of a graduate should be an easy law suit for anybody that wants to try it. It would immediately expose the hypocrisy of a system that binds the players to a school by punishing them for transferring to another school. My understanding is that even if the school pulls a players scholarship at the end of a year, they retain the right to restrict his transfer to another school that is willing to give him a scholarship. The graduate transfer rule further restricts the player in that the graduate degree at the other school must be something the current school does not offer. Thus if he gets a business degree from Podunk U and wants to get an MBA from Alabama or Stanford with a scholarship he can’t because Podunk offers an MBA program. This is the one thing that should be eliminated yesterday. If I’m wrong about the details of this let me know.

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  5. 85ishDawg

    Well these players just don’t have enough gratitude. If they really appreciated the efforts of the school to keep them eligible for four years, then they would be begging their coaches for the opportunity to stay on the team. Even if they are not good enough for playing time, it would be a valuable “internship” just to be around the younger players taking their spot, and they should be grateful to train their replacement. The school has given them a degree, free room and board and even branded clothing. Don’t they see how lucky they are to have such benevolent coaches and administration??? My kids would love to have such a deal, because I raised them right!!!!

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  6. 85ishDawg

    Well these players just don’t have enough gratitude. If they really appreciated the efforts of the school to keep them eligible for four years, then they would be begging their coaches for the opportunity to stay on the team. Even if they are not good enough for playing time, it would be a valuable “internship” just to be around the younger players taking their spot, and they should be grateful to train their replacement. The school has given them a degree, free room and board and even branded clothing. Don’t they see how lucky they are to have such benevolent coaches and administration??? My kids would love to have such a deal, because I raised them right!!!!

    Like

    • Cojones

      You printed the same message twice.

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      • Cojones

        I sent the same message twice and it wouldn’t post, but instead told me it was a duplicate message. However, it was typed twice to attempt posting inside a minute like your was.

        85ish, my attempt at humor was sidetracked by Word. Disregard the above posting since it doesn’t come off as humor anymore. Btw, this is my second typing of this similar message that it refused to post out of spite (or the Senator is holding his hand on the key).

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    • Cojones

      Was going to make a funny by typing my message twice, but the Word caught the same message and claimed it had already been printed. How in hell can it not let the same message that’s typed separately be printed? Meanwhile, it duplicated yours without so much as a howdy. We know this because no one could have typed the same thing twice inside the same minute posted as yours was. It’s a friggin’ prejudiced blog I tells you.

      Disregard the previous posting since it wasn’t meant seriously, 85ish.

      Like

  7. John Denver is full of shit...

    Can’t wait to see crumpton burn Wiggins on a skinny post

    Like

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