Forget “it’s time to attack the day”.

This could very well be the most badass pre-game ceremony I’ve ever watched (h/t).

Man, I wish there was some way to import that to a Saturday afternoon between the hedges.  Or at least sign a couple of those dudes as defensive linemen.  Wowser.

32 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

32 responses to “Forget “it’s time to attack the day”.

  1. Dolly Llama

    Looks like Hawaii before we dismantled them in the Sugar Bowl.

    Like

  2. Hogbody Spradlin

    Kinda like that Hawaii thing.

    Like

  3. Spike

    If the Dawgs did that the refs would flag us.. Penn Wagers has a woodie looking at that!

    Like

  4. JasonC

    Maori Hakka dance. Common in NZ and among Pacific Islanders

    Like

    • atlasshrugged55

      The All Blacks (New Zealand’s nat’l rugby team) do the Haka prior to each test match. They’re the 2 time defending world champs & it’s very entertaining & intense.

      I highly recommend watching rugby at the highest level (NZ, So Africa, Australia, England, Ireland, Wales, … etc). The games are amazingly physical & skillful & the NZ announcers are almost Munson-esque w/ their broad vocabulary. Not like the ignorant ex-jocks we suffer through on espn.

      Like

  5. JG Shellnutt

    Is that the Sharks vs. the Jets?

    Like

  6. Athens Dog

    They applauded each other…………..would never happen in the SEC

    Like

  7. bulldogbry

    Mute it and then in your mind chant, “We got the spirit, yes we do! We got the spirit, how bout YOU?!”

    It’s way funnier.

    Like

  8. John Denver is full of shit...

    I’d settle for “welcome to the jungle” over the multi million dollar sound system.

    Like

  9. Mayor

    All show man. If you recall the University of Hawaii does antics just like that in its pregame warmups for football and we know how tough they really are, don’t we?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Got Cowdog

      No offense, Mayor, but I spent some time with the UGA Rugby team (not as a player) while I was there. Those Dudes were intense, to say the least.

      Like

    • illini84

      What a schmuck.

      Like

      • Got Cowdog

        Beg pardon?

        Like

        • Got Cowdog

          They weren’t the Blind Pigs then. I think it was the first year and it was not “University” sanctioned, it was intramural and they played other semi pro clubs. A couple of my buddies played. One of the two full on bar brawls in which I have been involved was while drinking with the rugby club (bring your “A” game) and started over an arm-wrestling contest. Good times.

          Like

          • illini84

            Hmm, I’ve been here since 84 and always knew them by that name but who knows? I guess they moved form intramural to cub status somewhere in there. I broke my back and have rods on my spine so I had to just be a “social member” , it wouldn’t be to smart to stick my head in the drum. The brawling stuff is funny because drinking with the other team is a time honored rugger tradition.

            Like

          • illini84

            Check that, the Blind Pigs is the alumni team.

            Like

  10. truck

    Reminds me of the “You Got Served” episode of South Park.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Keese

    When I lived in Hawaii…if anyone from Tonga-Samoa got into a scrap clear out the bar. They hated each other

    Like

    • illini84

      My nieces went to high school right next LAX and there were lots of Polynesians. If someone thinks those dudes are not tight they are just plain ignorant.

      Like

  12. CPark58

    Marcus Howard is unimpressed.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Nashville West

    Obviously the dudes in red kicked a$$ on the blue losers.

    Like

  14. illini84

    The young men depicted in the film In Football We Trust dream of continuing a tradition among Polynesian athletes: to play in the NFL. Even though Polynesians (Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders) make up only 0.5 percent of the U.S. population (2010 U.S. Census), more than 200 Polynesians have played professionally in the National Football League (and in the Canadian Football League) — 28 times more likely than any other ethnic group. Just like the Bloomfield brothers, Fihi Kaufusi, and Harvey Langi from In Football We Trust, many Polynesian NFL players had to face poverty, gang violence, and racism.

    http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/content/polynesian-nfl-players-pipeline-to-the-pinnacle-of-football/

    Like

  15. The other Doug

    It just means more

    Like