“Makes you think.”

At least Mr. Mobley will be paying taxes, or some such other clarifying nonsense, right?

What indefensible bullshit.

23 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

23 responses to ““Makes you think.”

  1. S

    Bet he gets one hell of a “performance bonus” the years his kids sign, too

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  2. Ohio Dawg

    Well, Crean does need assistant coaches, right? So they happen to have 5-Star phenom sons. Isn’t that a coincidence?

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  3. Dave

    There are rules precluding a HS coach from being hired and then having kids from his HS attend the college he went to (I think that’s the case, anyway). Not sure anything can be done about a family member, though.

    Loopholes gonna loophole.

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    • The whole point is that the party creating the loopholes is having the FBI criminalize some parts of its rule book.

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      • Got Cowdog

        My take is the NCAA can’t shut that one because of precedent and it’s relatively harmless in the grand scheme because they limit the number of coaches on staff anyway, right?
        The shitty thing is the way they are trying to go about getting the other genie back in the bottle. The FBI? For fuck’s sake, doesn’t the FBI have better things to do?
        NCAA guy: “Basketball boosters are paying big money to high school kids to go to the college the booster supports.”
        FBI guy: ‘So?”
        NCAA: “Well, that’s against the rules.”
        FBI: “Whose rules?”
        NACC: “Our rules.”
        FBI: “Ok, hold on a second” (scratches around in drawer and looks at pay stub) “Sorry, it doesn’t say NCAA anywhere here on my check.”
        NCAA: “But you have to stop this, it will lead to the demise of amateurism and deprive our country of it’s right to College Athletics”
        FBI: “Refresh my memory, which amendment covers that?”
        NCAA: “Well, none but……”
        FBI: “That’s what I thought. If you will excuse me there is a pedophile reportedly traveling from state to state with a NCAA women’s gymnastic team abusing the girls. Word on the street is you and your boss knew about it and looked the other way. I’ll be by later to chat about THAT. Get the fuck out of my office I have real work to do.”

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      • Dave

        No, I know. It’s ridiculous, and yet there is always going to be a line in the sand. Plenty of other rules in the rule book that nobody would deem criminal.

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      • Lou

        that’s not how the law works – criminal offenses are criminal offenses

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        • Sure. If amateurism didn’t exist, what laws were being broken?

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          • Lou

            I really enjoy your blog, you help me survive the offseason. But imho, I think you’re obsessed.

            Violation of amateurism isn’t the crime, it’s solicitation of bribery and fraud. The scale of the fraud in dollars and the high profile nature makes it particularly important. Bribery and fraud exist in lots of non-amateur sports occasions, like FIFA. I don’t think it’s valid argument for any of these coaches or companies to argue, “the rules of amateurism made me commit the crime.” I don’t think that all of the coaches set out to commit a criminal act. Their fuzzy ethics just allowed them to go too far and now they have to deal with the consequences.

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            • Violation of amateurism isn’t the crime, it’s solicitation of bribery and fraud.

              I understand that. But without the NCAA prohibiting player compensation, there’s no need to resort to crime to land a player. And I’ve posted enough at this point to think there’s a legitimate question about whether anyone’s going to jail.

              I mean, look at your use of a loaded term like bribery here. In any other area where people’s services are offered, such a payment would be called a signing bonus.

              To me, this comes off as overzealous and an unfortunate use of public resources. If that’s obsessive on my part, so be it.

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              • Lou Ortiz

                Bribery isn’t a loaded term, it’s a criminal act. It’s what they’re being charged with. I’m sure Martha Stewart didn’t think she was going to jail either.

                Many people – not me – think that cracking down on narcotics is a waste of resources. There have to be rules and you have to draw the line somewhere, otherwise, you end up with 8th graders on retainer. If that’s where we’re at, just have to agree to disagree.

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                • There have to be rules and you have to draw the line somewhere, otherwise, you end up with 8th graders on retainer.

                  That’s one helluva reason to send someone to jail for.

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                • I think his point is that “bribery” is largely a crime of procedure, as opposed to something SUBSTANTIVELY bad at its core (or at least that many think is bad). Bribery is a payment to induce behavior…….but when you don’t criminalize the underlying act (paying a kid to play somewhere) you no longer call it bribery.

                  The problem many have in this case is that they’re indicting people under the procedural aspects, the means-to-an-end if you will, when a large swath of the general public believes that the “End” that makes those means criminal is a joke to begin with.

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                • Lou Ortiz

                  I understand your point, but fundamentally disagree. I think corrupt behavior is inherently bad and always harmful – that’s the underlying issue. If an individual (coach/govt official) signs a contract or takes an oath to abide by rules and then knowingly breaks those rules and commits a crime, then that individual should be punished.

                  I don’t follow college bball because of stuff like this, but my understanding is that almost no one thinks the AAU bs is totally corrupt. Since the kids involved are not able to sign contracts, this behavior gets awfully close to human trafficking – you’ve got the act, the means and the purpose all there. It feels slimy because it is slimy. If kids need to be paid to play, go the way of pro baseball, soccer, and (formerly) basketball. Don’t put it in universities or high schools where you’re just begging for more public corruption.

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                • What contract did the shoe company guys sign?

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                • Lou

                  Company employees have their own ethical clauses in employment contracts. So if they’re paying an illegal bribe, i suppose that’s the one they’re violating when it comes to the company.

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                • And that’s fine, if the company chooses to enforce such a provision. But what does that have to do with seeking criminal charges?

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  4. gastr1

    Shades of Ed and Danny Manning. Good old Larry Brown… the best cheatingest coach ever.

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  5. NCDawgMan

    I think the NCCA rule is that that Visionary Institution of Higher learning after said coach is hired; School can not recruit kids from that Higher Learning Instition for a period of 2 years

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  6. Makes you wonder did the school use the father to get the kids or did the father use the kids to get the job?

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  7. Welcome to hoops 101.

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  8. Broken Steel Chair

    Don’t know what it would’ve cost USC on the college hoops’ secondary market, but the free market perks are quite nice for an unqualified guy who has two elite level sons.

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