There’s always something to game.

This genuinely sounds well-intentioned.  (h/t)

The Division I Committee on Academics will recommend to the Transfer Working Group that four-year transfer student-athletes who meet specific grade-point average and progress-toward-degree requirements be able to compete immediately at the second school.

The academic data reviewed by the committee indicated that, on average, sitting out a year of competition following a transfer may not be academically necessary for student-athletes with a strong scholastic foundation. As a result, the committee will recommend benchmarks that align with successful academic progress after transfer.

Committee members agreed those benchmarks should include a GPA between 3.0 and 3.3 and a requirement that students be academically eligible for competition at the time of transfer, based on their progress toward earning a degree within five years of initial enrollment.

So why do I have the feeling that some coaches who will remain nameless might suddenly find it in their best interests to allow their student-athletes to take more challenging courses?

7 Comments

Filed under Academics? Academics., The NCAA

7 responses to “There’s always something to game.

  1. Granthams replacement

    Auburn is in real trouble.

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  2. djrichiep

    Nick Saban likes the way you think!

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  3. Hogbody Spradlin

    Why would Saban have to steer players to harder courses, when he already tells the instructors what grade to give and they gleefully comply?

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    • Derek

      I just have to ask a simple question: if the new school has admitted the slave/employee/player/student-athlete haven’t they implicitly decided the kid can effectively play AND go to school all at the same time?

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      • Hogbody Spradlin

        I was figuring, tongue in cheek, that Saban would command grades good enough to stay eligible at Bama, but not good enough to transfer. Does that respond?

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  4. UGA '97

    Or stay put, sit out and sell your likeness to pay for remaining courses and complete a degree.

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