Enabling Mark Emmert’s wet dream

As we know, the NCAA doesn’t have subpoena power.  With it’s latest announcement, though, it’s determined to cobble together the next best thing.  It’s a double-edged sword the organization will be swinging.

First, check the fine print.

As a term of employment, school presidents and athletics staff must commit contractually to full cooperation in the investigations and infractions process. Full cooperation means reporting violations in a timely manner; sharing all knowledge and documents requested in a timely manner; providing access to all electronic devices, social media and other technology; and maintaining confidentiality. The chair of the Division I Committee on Infractions or the Independent College Sports Adjudication Panel can impose immediate penalties when schools or individuals do not cooperate (including loss of revenue or postseason opportunities). These bodies can consider lack of cooperation as admission of a violation.

Those terms will be required in every contract entered into from now on.  I will be genuinely curious to see how a “lack of cooperation as admission of a violation” standard plays out.  (Just think about where Ole Miss would be right now if that had been the approach from the beginning.)

Second, the NCAA welcomes its new criminal justice system overlords.

People charged with investigating and resolving NCAA cases can accept information established by another administrative body, including a court of law, government agency, accrediting body or a commission authorized by a school. This will save time and resources previously used to confirm information already adjudicated by another group.

Criminalizing the NCAA rule book is now an official feature.

Before you start fist pumping over the possibility that some of your favorite schools are about to enter a serious world of hurt for lyin’ and cheatin’, remember this is Mark Emmert we’re talking about here.

That would be this Mark Emmert.

That’s how you get shoulder shrugs like this one from Dan Gavitt, the NCAA’s vice president of of men’s basketball:  “We could’ve done a little better job of communicating [Wednesday’s] news with them. I’ll just leave it at that.”

All of that, and players are still gonna get paid under the table.

Yeah, this is gonna be fine.

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5 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

5 responses to “Enabling Mark Emmert’s wet dream

  1. lakedawg

    Guess these would apply to Urban Liar as well.

    Like

  2. Burn the NCAA to the ground, Jeffrey Kessler.

    Like

  3. Macallanlover

    Amazing Emmert is still at the top of this organization, he has been a total fail since the first week. Will be interesting to see how the prezs react to this. It isn’t like the power players really need the NCAA, there has been a move before to send this message (proud UGA was a part of that), maybe this time they could split away from the weaker sisters and form an organization that is more in line with their needs. have always thought this was a dysfunctional relationship because of the diverse needs of several hundred schools versus the top 50 or so. Doubt it happens, but would be a better approach for each to go their own way, imo, especially with football. NCAA may be the one group with lower approval ratings than Congress. we may be stuck with one but the NCAA’s ineptness makes them discretionary. Throw them out!

    Like

  4. stoopnagle

    Wow, this sounds like what’s happened at UGA the last few years with some programs and changes. We’re gangbusters at marketing while leaving the important details to be sorted down the road. Good luck, Kennesaw State!

    Like

  5. JCDAWG83

    If this goes as the NCAA thinks it will, this could be Auburn’s worst nightmare come true.

    Like

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