Oh, what could have been.

From Bill Connelly’s piece about Oklahoma State’s new offensive coordinator:

Averaging nearly 90 plays and 44 points per game, the 2013 Tigers used modern-day tempo and made themselves almost un-scoutable. Three quarterbacks — Quinn Epperly, Connor Michelsen, and Kedric Boston — not only took snaps as first-stringers, but stayed on the field at other positions, too. […]

“There’s no law against it,” Surace says, matter-of-factly. “There’s no law against a team like Alabama, with two good quarterbacks, having them in on the same play occasionally. If we do it, it’s because we think we can run efficient plays.” […]

“Our guys can really process the information,” Surace says. “You can talk to them at a high level football-wise. They’re not NFL players, and we don’t have unlimited time with them, but within that small work week, we can give them a lot of information.”

The benefits of having a few different guys who can throw the ball can pay off in obvious ways, especially near the goal line.

Could you imagine running that with Fromm and Fields last season down on the goal line?  Let’s see Todd Grantham defend that.

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39 Comments

Filed under Strategery And Mechanics

39 responses to “Oh, what could have been.

  1. Clayton Davis

    A lot like the Mayfield Rose Bowl TD. I wonder if Riley watched this and added an end around for further confusion.

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  2. DoubleDawg1318

    Don’t you know being creative and passing the ball saps the toughness of your team? We might get stuffed from the 1 yard line 6 straight times, but man look at all the toughness we instilled. That should help us in the 4th quarter against Alabam…oh wait.

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  3. Dylan Dreyer's Booty

    That is all well and good – and it is certainly fun – but the reason you do that all the time is because you have to with the personnel that you have available. I am good with us doing it some of the time, but I’d rather that other teams be surprised when we do it.

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    • MGW

      That’s what they said about the spread 10-15 years ago. And the air raid about 1 year ago.

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      • Dylan Dreyer's Booty

        Yes, and 10-15 years later really good teams use elements of the spread, but don’t rely on it because they haven’t got the personnel to do anything else. We are finally building an OL that crush people, so we should use it.

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  4. I am not sold on having multiple QBs on the field. You take a very good runner out of the game to put another QB in.

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    • Otto

      Fields could run with many RBs especially outside the SEC, and Fromm is no slouch. Fromm ran some very effective RPOs keeping the ball for some nice gains.

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    • Fields averaged 6.33 ypc last season. That’s higher than Herrien’s average.

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      • Otto

        Not arguing that at all and it proves my point but, as someone who believes Herrien was under utilized (especially in the Cotton) Herrien’s carries were often in garbage time with eat the clock plays where everyone knew what was coming.

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      • Russ

        He was also significantly larger than several of our backs.

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    • Otto

      Yes you are depending on winning the #s battle with the D having to account for every potential ball carrier for most of the play and to do that you have to be willing to give any of them the ball sort of like giving the FB the ball out of the I formation just enough so that they give him attention..

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  5. Otto

    The Sooner ran a similar play against UGA but throwing to Mayfield. The DB in the play above should not give up the WR to go to the corner, always stick with your man (especially against dual threat and Big12 spread offenses) and trust the big guys up front to win their battles.

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  6. Yurdle

    I’m in the the school of thinking this is clever but not revolutionary. A QB is seldom as good as an RB at running or a WR at catching, to say nothing of a QB’s normal lack of excellent blocking (though Jake Fromm says hi). Perhaps guys like Fields are different, but it usually boils down to not wanting those guys to take true RB hits.

    Put another way, if Fields is going to have a run/pass option on a play, does it stress the defense more to have him get the snap from Fromm on a sweep or have an extra WR or RB carry out the sweep fake? That QB in the video had to throw (he had no running lane), and the CB who blew his assignment wasn’t about to make a play on the QB.

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    • Not trying to be overly snarky here, but how many times during the season did we bitch about how Chaney was only using Fields to run the ball and not giving him a chance to throw?

      I don’t think not wanting Fields to take true RB hits was the issue last year.

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      • Otto

        True and on the flip side, Chaney seemed more willing to let Fromm take QB hits with Eason on the bench than he did with Fields on the bench.

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        • Texas Dawg

          That made me stop and ponder the recent rules change. I wonder how much Eason would have played had the 4 game and still redshirt rule been in effect in 2017?

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          • Otto

            True and it also makes me question how ready they thought Fields was if they protected Fromm from taking hits but not encouraging him to keep it in a RPO.

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      • Yurdle

        I feel you, but my skepticism is this: would those plays have worked better if we had replaced a TE with Jake Fromm so he could hand off to Fields? What does having both of them in there really accomplish? The extra QB seems like dead weight.

        We lost those plays because we lost the matchups in the trenches. In that regard, I would call that stubbornness instead of a lack of creativity.

        I would also suggest that the raw numbers on Fields’s passing v running are skewed by his tendency to make one read and then run. He ran on several called passes (or at least plays with a pass option).

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    • Fields ran the ball 42 times last season and threw 39.

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  7. Minnesota Dawg

    Nah….I’d like to repeatedly run the same play up the middle at the goal line, where the unblocked, backside DE makes the tackle every time. Then I’d like to do it again.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. David K

    I heard Kirby tried to run a play like that once, but Fields couldn’t hear the playcall due to tall the racist stuff being yelled at him from the stands.

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  9. stoopnagle

    Kirby sits in a dark room, watching film, shaking his head.

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  10. 69Dawg

    Ah well you don’t have Chaney to kick around anymore. The goal line offense was beaten by not having leverage on the DL. That and by not having a fullback that could cold cock the edge rusher. Face it at times our TE’s were just matadors waving a cape as the bulls ran by. On the goal line power low man wins, our 6′ 5″ guys got submarined and we just kept doing it. That is the definitions of insanity and Kirby went insane.

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    • Russ

      Not to argue the point about TE blocking, but on the eleventeen play drive at the goal line against Florida, there were several plays were we just didn’t even attempt to block Zuniga. You’d have thought after the second or third time, we’d attempt to block him, but nooooooooo.

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    • Would REALLY like to know how many (if any) times the co-OC said about the other co-OC making the calls “can’t believe he’s calling that play AGAIN”…”hey jim, need a crayon”…or maybe “shit, did kirby really say THAT”….just wundooring…..

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  11. ASEF

    When you have a roster as stacked as Georgia’s, putting 2 QBs on the field means removing a 5 star WR or RB. I wonder what the risk/reward of that is.

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  12. hailtogeorgia

    But, will they block?

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  13. PTC DAWG

    Pound the rock.

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  14. FlyingPeakDawg

    I want to say we did have Fromm and Fields in on the same play once or twice last season, but it was Fields taking the snap and Fromm out wide with Fields keeping on the RPO?

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