Mark Emmert’s wet dream

Violate NCAA rules and go to jail.

Federal prosecutors are demanding jail time for three men convicted of bribery and fraud charges in the pay-to-play college basketball trial. 

The defendants — Adidas executive James Gatto, former Adidas consultant Merl Code and aspiring sports agent Christian Dawkins — earlier this month submitted motions asking for probation in lieu of prison sentences, but government attorneys pushed back in court documents filed Tuesday.

“A sentence that includes a term of incarceration is necessary to reflect, among other things, the seriousness of the defendants’ conduct and the need to promote deterrence, and is thus sufficient but not greater than necessary to further the legitimate purposes of sentencing,” U.S. Attorney Robert S. Khuzami wrote.

Jesus.  And that’s on top of restitution.

The government said Gatto, Code and Dawkins owe Louisville $31,922.75, based on Bowen’s attendance during the spring and fall semesters in 2017. Gatto alone owes totals of $1,136,424.52 to Kansas and $258,585 to NC State, which include financial aid and tuition paid while Preston, De Sousa and Smith were on campus.

That’s restitution for tuition that’s not actually paid by a school, although, if you’re going to argue the schools were somehow the victims here, I guess that’s at least consistent.  Crazy, but consistent.

I’m waiting for the NCAA to go all in with some sort of “VIOLATING AMATEURISM IS AGAINST THE LAW” promo.  Should be boffo.

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5 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, The NCAA

5 responses to “Mark Emmert’s wet dream

  1. Thanks… It’s nice to have a good laugh as your day starts…

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  2. Go Dawgs!

    This is beyond ridiculous.

    The federal government is not responsible for enforcing the NCAA’s rules. Crimes were committed, I guess, but only because athletes were given money when they are not permitted to be paid for their services, which is ridiculous. If the legal system demands some sort of penalty, fine, but certainly this is nothing that rises to the level of requiring jail time? Are you kidding me?

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  3. Russ

    So, Lehman Brothers and their ilk nearly bring down the US economy and no one goes to jail. These guys pay to get basketball players to go to a particular school and they go to jail? Yeah, that makes perfect sense. Exactly who was harmed here?

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  4. Mayor

    Even if one accepts the premise that the actions of these defendants was a crime, the iffy nature of the financial harm makes the imposition of financial restitution as part of a criminal sentence a manefest overreach. Why even have civil cases at all?

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  5. Former Fan

    What crimes were committed Senator? If it were states, maybe they interfered with state laws concerning state schools. But I am confused how giving money to workers of another company on the side is not violating any laws. Color me confused.

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