“Coach Coley is a big tight end guy.”

Gee, where have I heard this before?

“If I am a tight end in the Georgia system right now, I would be pretty excited that James Coley is calling the plays.”

It must be preseason in Athens.

The coordinators may change, but the siren song remains the same.

22 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Strategery And Mechanics

22 responses to ““Coach Coley is a big tight end guy.”

  1. We were told Chaney is a big tight end guy.

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  2. Brian Schottenheimer, Jim Chaney and James Coley talk about tight ends. Georgia fans are enthralled.

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  3. Gaskilldawg

    What is the fascination with throwing to the tight ends? Forcing throws to tight ends would have taken carries away from Michel, Chubb, Swift or Holyfield, or catch opportunities away from Hardman, or Ridley, or Godwin. Sure, Nauta and Woerner are good, but it isn’t as if the other options weren’t NFL quality.

    Made sense to me that the QB had progressions and the coverage dictated to whom he threw.

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    • Gaskill, speaking for myself, it was more that the tight end was being used to help in pass protection rather than being in the progression. Because the tight end wasn’t a consistent threat, it forced the ball outside the hashmarks.

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      • Gaskilldawg

        If we need the tight end in pass protection, and we reduce our ability to pass protect because we removed the TE necessary to that role, don’t we make it more difficult to pass successfully to any receiver?

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        • Uglydawg

          The pass to a tight end over the middle usually comes out fast enough to negate the pass rush..Then there is the delay..where the TE chip blocks his man and releases. The TE pass is a great hammer in an OC’s tool box, but if you’re scared of tipped passes or overthrows over the middle you would limit the TE passes. Maybe that was Cheney’s fear?? Or maybe he just really did want that extra protection so Fromm could make it through his progressions and pick apart the defense.

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        • If you can’t or won’t attack the middle of the field, you play right into a defense like Bama’s hands.

          Everyone thought our offensive lines stunk in the Richt era, but we used the tight end lethally because we didn’t keep him in to block.

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          • Tony Barnfart

            Actually, the conventional wisdom vs. Alabama is that you have to directly attack the press coverage of their corners. Which is exactly what Fromm is good at and what we did in the first half.

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            • For that to continue to work, you have to be able to run the ball to force the defense to walk that safety down rather than play man with 2 deep safeties or you have to be able to exploit behind the linebackers and in front of the safeties in the middle of the field to keep those safeties from cheating to the corners.

              You cannot depend on your QB to drop dimes in tight press coverage on the outside for 60 minutes to beat a defense the quality of Bama’s.

              Saban’s perspective is that if you can do that consistently for 60 minutes, I’ll tip my cap to you. He defends the middle of the field outward.

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              • Tony Barnfart

                Not saying I disagree with you, but if we’re going to go macro instead of micro (where to attack first to get control of who dictates and who reacts), you may as well say “we just gotta beat them.” Saying we gotta run it well and hit them everywhere in the passing game is true, but it’s really just saying “we gotta be better.” Seems like the exercise is where and how to start striking so that they’re the ones off balance.

                At least according to Danielson (I know, I know) at the beginning of the SECCG, the place to first establish the fact that your offense will dictate–not be dictated upon–is dropping back shoulder throws against their press coverage.

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                • No doubt … I don’t disagree, but one thing (among many) that Little Nicky learned between 2004 and 2017 is the ability to make adjustments. David Greene dropped dimes on LSU’s press coverage for 60 minutes, and we pounded them (we also ran the ball well that day as I recall). Fromm was doing the same thing. Nick changed it up and took the outside throw away. When that happened, it seemed Kirby and Chaney said, “Damn, let’s let the air out of the tires and hang on.” In both games, once Nick made adjustments, his front 4 took over.

                  I’m not saying the conventional wisdom is wrong … Danielson (even though, I can’t stand him) has forgotten more football than I know. All I’m saying is you better be ready to counter-punch when Nick makes his adjustments.

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  4. Hogbody Spradlin

    Been visiting this site since Stafford and Moreno were pups, and there’s been tight end excitement every . single . off season.

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  5. CEPH

    Woerner is probably the best athlete on the team. Watch how many teams throw the ball down the middle, a la Clemson, Ala. etc. Not Ga. They love the sideline passes and the sideline is the DBs best friend. Woerner could be a terror over the middle with his size and ability to run after the catch. I sure as hell hope it happens!

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  6. Stan Darsh

    Based on Nauta’s combine numbers, we should not have been throwing to the TE.

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    • W Cobb Dawg

      Not sure Nauta made a good decision to leave early. Was advised not to enter the draft by the advisory committee, mediocre at the combine, and as I understand it looks to be a bumper crop of TEs in this draft.

      I didn’t believe Nauta was as talented as former TE Artie Lynch, who couldn’t stick in the nfl. I guess Nauta had his reasons for leaving. Hope he finished his degree.

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  7. CB

    Just saw Dawgs247 live on facebook. Good God, I thought DawgNation has gone down hill. It was putrid.

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