“It’s just different buckets, how the money gets structured.”

Just for yuks, when you read this article, try substituting student-athletes for coaches every time you read a compensation reference.

It’s not rocket science, folks.  Schools will pay what they can afford to pay, just like any other business venture.

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22 Comments

Filed under It's Just Bidness, The NCAA

22 responses to ““It’s just different buckets, how the money gets structured.”

  1. Yeah, but that will take money away from the Assistant to the Assistant Athletic Director for Compliance and those sorts. We can’t have those folks having to shop at Publix rather than Whole Foods.

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  2. Got Cowdog

    Looking at the bloated coaching salaries and AA budgets as a normal person: I’d say use the stipend and scholarship as the “minimum wage” and let the athlete’s capitalize on their NLI, with the AA’s and conferences and NCAA getting a cut of course. That seems fair.

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  3. Bill Glennon

    What happens when the rich schools outbid the small schools and free agency (post Martel) makes it possible for the rich schools to re-recruit players from small programs every year?

    Say Andy Isabella of UMASS asked for a hardship waiver because Alabama can pay him more, How are non-P5 schools ever going to compete, or poorer power 5 schools for that matter?

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  4. Patrick

    It’s obvious the system makes money. Right now, the money goes into artificial value things like 42 assistant coach salaries and Disneyworld facilities.

    But I don’t think paying the money straight to individual players based on market value is the answer. Too many average players with too little benefit.

    I would rather pour the money into a system that helps the most players prep for post-sports career. Divorce from the current academic standards. We already do that at admission. And instead fully fund a real-world educational system that actually meets all players needs. Some kids stay with microbiology, some kids learn a trade. There enough money to insure that all kids get enough resources to improve their lives.

    In short, I guess I’m a socialist when it comes to college sports.

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    • At least you’re honest about it. 😉

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    • Otto

      I agree with much of Patrick’s post. However, I think all college students should take Financial Planning, Business Law, and Civil Law classes. It is amazing how naive college grads have been for at minimum the past 25 years. What is the average credit card debt, and savings/retirement account size in the US?

      Students athletes currently have the option to major in their sport with a useless major or do the work for a useful degree.

      I don’t agree that the views are socialist but paying your dues. Apprenticeships in trades are under paid heavy work, if you graduate UGA in accounting and go on the audit trail with a big firm you’re under paid with a well paying job at the end. Doctors, nurses, and teachers all work in the field without getting paid or little pay. Grad Students also generate millions for the University with little pay. R&D expenditures of $453 million. How much does the school make? https://research.uga.edu/fast-facts/

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      • Connor

        You are certainly underpaid as a fresh-out-of-school auditor with a big firm, but you are paid. And as you note, there is a very good chance you’ll go on to make much more later. For most of these guys college is the most value they will ever have as football players. I don’t think accountants would put up with it if only 1 out of every 100 managed to stay in the field after the age of 25.

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    • ATL Dawg

      So you mean money spent on coaching/staff/administrative salaries and athletic facilities should be reduced/capped and the savings should be put towards the more wide ranging educational system that you describe?

      I’ve often thought that the schools might be able to better justify not paying the players if they capped coaching/staff/admin and athletic facility money to a number much, much lower than what the big schools spend on that stuff. At least then they wouldn’t be so outrageously hypocritical.

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      • Patrick

        Correct.

        Disneyland weight rooms get reduced and Disneyland academics and life skills that actually make sense get created.

        Some pro athletes have a salary cap. Maybe college coaching staffs need one.

        Join me comrades.

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        • Jack Klompus

          Patrick, I like your proposal. However, you fail to take into account the majority of Universities inability to prepare the bulk of non-student athletes for the real world.

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          • Patrick

            That crossed my mind. An affiliation with the university for the kids who want microbiology, but programs somehow handled outside the university for other trades, skills, etc.

            This is just my principled view of where the money SHOULD go within this ridiculous ecosystem we created.

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        • ATL Dawg

          I’m with you comrade. At least part of the way…

          If they’re going to continue not paying the players, I’m absolutely in favor of capping coaching/staff/admin salaries and athletic facility spending. There are so many ways that money could be better spent.

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