A perverse incentive

Mike Brey sincerely hopes for a crackdown on dirty coaches.

Notre Dame men’s basketball coach Mike Brey, who is president of the National Association of Basketball Coaches’ board of directors, on Wednesday challenged schools to be more be aggressive about firing coaches for cause when they violate NCAA or school rules.

“Why don’t AD’s and presidents drop the hammer?” Brey said while appearing as a panelist before a meeting of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics here.

Excellent question, sir.  It turns out the math is really, really hard.

That five-star stud generates way more revenue for a school than the school lays out for him.  Factor on top of that third-party payments to steer a kid to a particular program that don’t come out of the school’s pocket, and — if you’re really lucky — court-ordered restitution to a “victimized” school.  The end result?  It’s actually more profitable for coaches / institutions to violate NCAA rules than to follow them.  Which also means more enforcement doesn’t solve anything.

Pardon my French, but that’s really fucked up.

19 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

19 responses to “A perverse incentive

  1. Hogbody Spradlin

    So the schools get to pay ‘costs of attendance’ for the valuable capital asset (pardon me depersonalizing young men) and keep all the profit. Nice.

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  2. If the top of D1 broke away from the NCAA, they could come up with a sensible system for student-athlete compensation (the Olympic model is a good place to start) beyond the scholarship. They could then simplify the rule book to focus on what is really important and make the penalties draconian.

    The bottom line is the upper tier schools (80-90) have allowed themselves to be tied down by the other 260 schools. It’s time to break the cords.

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    • Gaskilldawg

      The millions and millions the schools get from the NCAA men’s basketball tournament is incentive to stay in an organization with the likes of Villanova.

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      • My perspective is that the millions and millions will still be there under a new system. Do Villanova and Gonzaga drive the millions of dollars or do Duke, North Carolina, Kentucky, Kansas, UCLA, etc. drive the money? I would suggest it’s the latter. With a smaller bracket (think 16) and fewer schools/conferences to spread the wealth with, the payouts are probably equal or better under this scenario than with 347 schools (at last count) chasing 65 spots.

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        • ASEF

          Agreed. A basketball tournament without auto qualifier dead weight would be much more valuable. And it would make P5 regular season basketball more relevant too.

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    • Junkyardawg41

      IMO going to the Olympic model = legitimizing what the FBI probes uncovered with regard to corporate funneling of funds. Nike, for example, would be the driving force steering recruits to schools. Or T. Boone Pickens. It helps with player compensation although I think it opens up an entirely new set of unforeseen issues — including a more corporate approach to college football.

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      • “A more corporate approach to college football”

        What do you think we have now? The facilities arms race, the soon-to-be $10m per year contracts, and the CFP with its Super Bowl Lite prices are just a few examples showing that ship sailed a long time ago.

        As the Senator so eloquently states about amateurism romantics, “Just say you don’t like the idea of paying players and call it a day.”

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  3. W Cobb Dawg

    Is something stopping Brey from naming those coaches he believes are cheating?

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  4. Russ

    I know we all think Auburn folks are dumb, but they figured this shit out years ago.

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  5. This would have more credibility if he explained exactly how he got his 5 star effect. As well as why, if this is so meaningful he doesn’t have these same concerns with high schools before these 5 stars get to college?

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  6. Proportionally speaking it is more. When Trevor Lawrence was at Cartersville their attendance was up about 30%. You think the attendance in Sanford stadium would be up that much? You think the attendance at Clemson has been up that much?

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  7. That is why I said Proportionally. Sure the values are more at the college level but the amount of impact is the same or greater in high school in most cases. Sanford Stadium holds a lot more people than Weinman Stadium. We are not talking total dollars here but proportional impact of one 5 star player versus another non 5 star player.

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    • Maybe I’m not understanding your point here. The Feds prosecuted folks for NCAA rules violations, essentially. What is the high school equivalent of that?

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      • My original point was that Andy Schwarz had stated what the increase in value is between a 5 star players and the rest. I am saying if he is concerned about that inequity why isn’t he concerned about that inequity in high school because it is the same or greater.. I would imagine it is because he hasn’t figured out how to profit from them yet because there is not nearly as much money in high school sports. But the inequity is the same or greater.

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        • Ah, now I understand you.

          Andy isn’t making a point about inequity. He’s showing data to support the idea that the schools turn so much of a profit off star players that they’re incentivized to cheat.

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  8. FlyingPeakDawg

    Hire Rick Pitino NOW!!!!!

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