Daily Archives: May 31, 2019

Booze 1, Bible Belt 0

Too much money being left on the table…

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UPDATE:  One more thing…

I can see it now:  Bud Light, the official beer of Georgia’s Magill Society!

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63 Comments

Filed under I'll Drink To That, SEC Football

Factoid of the day

From The Athletic’s Florida preview ($$) comes this somewhat startling gem:

Feleipe Franks became the first quarterback at Florida to start in every game in a season since Tim Tebow in 2009.

Holy crap.  How did Georgia lose three games in a row to that?

56 Comments

Filed under Gators, Gators...

“(But) it’s not that simple…”

You know, it’s funny how an entire group of folks pulling down six- and seven-figure annual salaries to make big decisions as a matter of routine all profess to being completely bamboozled when it comes to player compensation.

Some coincidence, hunh?

6 Comments

Filed under It's Just Bidness, The NCAA

“I expect us to be better, certainly,” Fulmer said.

No worries, Jeremy.  You got this.

“I do believe that we’ll be better. Would I love to sit here and say, ‘We’re going to win 10 or 11.’ Absolutely. I’d love to say that, but that’s up to everything falling right and kids coming through.”

No, really, you got this.

So much of Fulmer’s AD legacy, though, will be linked to his first hire and whether Pruitt delivers in elevating Tennessee’s program.

The Vols are coming off their seventh losing season in the past 11 years.

“This program, in my time around it, has never been at this place,” said Fulmer, who was UT’s coach from 1992-2008 after previously serving as an assistant for his alma mater. “I mean, in three out of the (last) five years, we had nobody drafted. At Tennessee? Are you kidding?

Easy peasy.

20 Comments

Filed under Because Nothing Sucks Like A Big Orange, The Glass is Half Fulmer

Accountability in an age of social media

Like I posted the other day, it’s good that the SEC is concerned about making sure the product isn’t perceived as having a fixed outcome.  Transparency isn’t a bad thing, generally speaking.  But this Steve Shaw quote, from Seth Emerson’s piece about football officiating ($$), does give me some pause about how far the conference should take things.

Fans may want blood when it comes to blown calls. But Shaw still wants to keep that quiet, not broadcasting it when an official is fired, demoted or suspended. That’s where the idea of transparency may have its limits.

That’s the worry in all this: Good officials will be afraid to stay in their jobs if their personal information is being blasted out on social media, their name dragged through the mud. That’s a legitimate worry. The answer to that isn’t to simply get the calls right. They can still get calls right and have irrational fans get angry at them.

In fact, the social media reaction is causing a problem recruiting younger officials, according to Shaw, which isn’t affecting the quality of officiating right now, but could eventually.

“They say, I don’t want any part of that,” Shaw said. “That’s something we’ve got to overcome.”

Honestly, I can’t say I blame them, considering the shit shows that routinely crop up in social media.  People get hot about political issues, but from a passion standpoint, blown football calls run pretty close.  Shaw’s got a tricky set of priorities to balance there.

16 Comments

Filed under SEC Football, Social Media Is The Devil's Playground

Moar 2019 betting lines

Seven Georgia games on that list:

  • -9.5 against Notre Dame
  • -18 against Tennessee
  • -20 against South Carolina
  • -3.5 against Florida
  • -7.5 against Auburn
  • -12.5 against Texas A&M
  • -20.5 against Georgia Tech

I thought that Florida line was a little slim yesterday, but Tech’s less than a three-touchdown underdog?  Hmmmm…

I had to look.  Here’s the margin of victory at BDS since Mark Richt became the head coach:

  • 2001:  14
  • 2003:  17
  • 2005:  7
  • 2007:  14
  • 2009:  6
  • 2011:  14
  • 2013:  7
  • 2015:  6
  • 2017:  31

So, that spread definitely falls outside the average from that period, but how many of those Tech squads were worse than what we’re likely to see this season?

10 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, What's Bet In Vegas Stays In Vegas

Just heppin’ the young people

Greg Sankey says he and the SEC coaches are a little worried about the transfer portal — oh, not for themselves, mind you, but for the young men who aren’t really capable of making decisions for themselves.

“I identified my concerns that we have young people going into the transfer portal who are under the impression perhaps there’s a waiver on the other side,” Sankey said, “and are making decisions when that may not be the case.”

That issue would certainly hit home with former Georgia freshman tight end Luke Ford, who transferred to Illinois but had his waiver request denied.

The eligibility waivers are determined on a case-by-case basis.

Former Bulldogs’ quarterback Justin Fields, for example, was granted his request for immediate eligibility and is expected to start at Ohio State this season.

But neither Ford nor Fields knew for sure what their status would be when they entered the portal, and Sankey and league coaches want to do something about that.

“The focus (was) on students-athletes understanding their status as they enter this (transfer) process,” Sankey said, “ …. so they make informed decisions.”

Yes, because if there’s one thing associated with the recruiting process when these same kids made their first decision to enroll, it’s that they’re fully informed of things like the coaches who’ve pitched themselves as being a big part of their future having plans to leave the program after signing day.

Even if I want to take Sankey’s touching concern as legitimate, exactly whom does he propose be responsible for providing these kids with the necessary information?  And, anyway, how can anyone know in advance whether a waiver will be granted?

The easier way out here is simply to give every student-athlete one free bite at the transfer apple, with no strings attached.  That’s takes the random subjectivity out of the equation, but I’m guessing that might be a little more freedom than Sankey’s comfortable with… for the kids, that is.

2 Comments

Filed under SEC Football, Transfers Are For Coaches.