Premium seating when you’re not in the big leagues

Greg McGarity does not approve of this.

The hostile nature of Apogee Stadium led Conference USA to move to a hard-line stance on student seating back in 2014, banning those fans from sitting directly behind an opponents’ bench.

North Texas athletic director Wren Baker confirmed Saturday that league officials have voted to reverse course and will allow students to sit in those premium seats.

Hell, approve?  I doubt he even comprehends it.  Why would you give up selling seats in a primo location like that?

Former UNT athletic director Rick Villarreal lobbied against C-USA’s restriction on student seating being enforced in 2014. He saw seating students in the premium seats behind the visitors’ bench as an opportunity to put the most enthusiastic fans in the most visible of locations for television games and as a way to secure future fans.  [Emphasis added.]

That’s a different sort of home field advantage, I guess.

6 Comments

Filed under It's Not Easy Being A Mid-Major

6 responses to “Premium seating when you’re not in the big leagues

  1. Hobnail_Boot

    It’s something we should’ve done at Stegeman years ago. Yeah

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  2. Bulldog Joe

    Did we up the minimum donation for the Spike Squad?

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  3. 69Dawg

    Old Fart here. 50 years ago the UGA student section went from the North Stands 50 yard line to where the band sits today. You were assigned seats based on your class. Grad Students and Seniors were on the 50. Times have changed since then of course. We used to greet the visitors to the chant of “Dawg Food” and we had cheers lead by the cheerleaders that include hell and Damn. Vince changes all of that when he became AD, no more cussing with the cheerleaders.

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    • It was that way when I was a freshman in 1972. I was okay with getting Aisle 11 or Aisle 12 seats because I knew I would get better seats each year. The student seating changed my sophmore year to random placement and I still got Aisle 11 or 12 seats often times in my upperclassmen years.

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