What might be

If you’re a Georgia fan, Mark Schlabach kinda buried the lede in his first Way-Too-Early 2020 CFB rankings.

Outlook: Georgia fans who weren’t happy with the team’s offense in 2019 will get their wish with a complete face-lift. Fromm, a three-year starter and most accurate passer in school history, is off to the NFL draft, along with three starting offensive linemen. Sophomore Cade Mays decided to transfer to Tennessee. Georgia scoured the graduate transfer market for a starting quarterback, and Wake Forest’s Jamie Newman has enrolled in classes at Georgia and will participate in spring practice. Changes are expected on Kirby Smart’s offensive staff as well. Keep an eye on former Cleveland Browns offensive coordinator Todd Monken.  [Emphasis added.] Georgia’s defense carried the load in 2019 and should be stout again, especially with safety Richard LeCounte, linebacker Monty Rice and cornerback Eric Stokes electing to return. The Bulldogs open the season against Virginia in Atlanta and play at Alabama on Sept. 19 and against Florida in Jacksonville, Florida, on Oct. 31.

Schlabach is fairly well connected in Athens, so take it for what it’s worth.  (I might also mention this isn’t the first time I’ve heard Monken’s name mentioned, so take that for what it’s worth, too.)

If you’re looking for some background information on Monken — and, given that he’s been around for a while, there’s plenty of that — this summary is as good a place to start as any.

Monken is not a traditional “Air Raid” coach, at least not in the sense most think when they hear that phrase. If you watch his offense at Oklahoma State or Southern Miss it bears almost no resemblance to what you’ll see from Mike Leach and his disciples.

Monken runs more of a spread offense that is built around throwing the football, but his offense is more balanced. While his offenses always lean heavy on the pass, the ability to be effective running and throwing the football is what makes them so explosive. The threat of the run also makes his pass offense more dynamic.

What I like most about Monken’s offense is that he will attack the entire field with the throwing game. His Oklahoma State offense attacked down the field quite a bit, but on every snap you had to be prepared to defend every zone, short to deep, inside and outside. Monken will attack with vertical stretch concepts, horizontal stretch concepts and he’ll run some triangle concepts that are a big part of the West Coast offense.

Monken also attacks with the play-action and screen game. His screen game attacks inside and outside, and will go to backs and receivers. He’ll get his running backs the football many ways. In 2011-12 his top back was Joseph Randle, who caught 71 passes in two seasons under Monken. In 2015 at Southern Miss, his top two backs combined for 79 caches and 799 yards.

I could live with that.

56 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Strategery And Mechanics

56 responses to “What might be

  1. Biggus Rickus

    Impossible. I have it on good authority that Smart is stubbornly going to refuse to change and go down the path of Les Miles.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Texas Dawg

      Nope, IF he refuses to change he is headed down the path of Les Miles. Last night that idiot who knows nothing about football, (you know that guy at Bama, Nick Saban who has not done very much) pretty much said the same thing (see above Bluto’s post Adapt or Die). Now is the time to see how flexible or hard headed Kirby is. Start turning the ship and the sky’s the limit. Stubbornly refuse to change and watch it slip away (Les Miles).

      Liked by 1 person

      • Biggus Rickus

        Uh huh. When LSU comes back down to earth offensively next year, maybe some of you will get that execution and players really do matter. Probably not, though.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Greg

          exactly………

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        • ASEF

          Who said execution and players don’t matter?

          LSU just won a national championship with an historic offense that their fans will warmly remember the rest of their lives. Do you really think if their offense struggles next year they’ll be regretting anything? Nope.

          Execution and players will get you so far. If you have an elite roster in a weak division, it pretty much banks 11 Ws. Winning those other 3 games requires plays and schemes that give your elite guys an edge on their elite guys.

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          • Biggus Rickus

            Georgia didn’t execute for shit half of the season and went 11-1. If they had executed on offense, they’d have given LSU a game.

            Liked by 1 person

            • ASEF

              Or maybe the scheme is difficult to execute because it makes everything hard?

              Running into numbers is hard and requires perfect execution. Timing sideline routes require perfect execution. Every play.

              So, yeah, “better execution” would get a better result. But designing an offense that requires only adequate execution to be successful probably gets an even better one.

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              • Tony Barnfart

                Half of the devastating plays the LSU offense makes are on breakdowns where the QB buys more time. Jake Fromm, god love him, needs to be the end of the statue era at Georgia. It’s not about running around like Michael Vick either…. but it is about turning a throwaway into an improvised 15-20 yard gain…..or a sack into a 9 yard scramble out of bounds.

                If your QB has no wheels or you don’t allow him to use them, you’re basically playing with 10 guys when it could be 11. Also, your timing in the passing game has to be impeccable. Again, most of LSU’s deadliness comes from Burrow buying a few extra seconds, which lowers the necessity of perfect timing when no DB can possibly hold out for so long.

                Liked by 1 person

              • Biggus Rickus

                The offense I saw against LSU had people running open that were missed and passes that were dropped. Georgia’s running game in ’19 was a puzzle. I expect blocking on the outside was the major problem, but interior blocking was inconsistent, at best. The thing is, they didn’t have the same difficulties running the same basic offense the previous two years. I think all of you are reading way too much into one season.

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            • stoopnagle

              37-10 is 17; 42-25 is 17.

              Weird, huh?

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          • Greg

            true…..but most importantly it is execution, it trumps all. Scheme will give you a chance to make plays, but if you can’t execute it…all goes for naught.

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            • So, why not run a scheme that’s easier for your talent to execute?

              Liked by 2 people

              • Greg

                Not disagreeing there, you should always run an offense or defense that fit your personnel. Also recruit that way (philosophy).

                We probably seen some of that on offense last year, and I bet we see some tweaking this year on ‘O..

                Just saying, you still have to execute it.

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        • Russ

          BR, LSU had basically the same players last year and had no where near the success as this year. Why is that? To me, I think it’s primarily the addition of Brady and a change to their offensive philosophy, which is what Orgeron and Ensminger have both said. What do you see that changed LSU’s fortunes this year?

          Liked by 1 person

          • Biggus Rickus

            The change probably better utilized their personnel, as they are receiver heavy. However, a year of playing together makes a gigantic difference. And Joe Burrow played the best season of football I’ve ever seen. They didn’t reinvent offense, and I’m betting they will never come close to duplicating what they accomplished this year with this system.

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        • Texas Dawg

          I guess you know more than Saban apparently since he thinks that the type of offense ALONG WITH TALENT AND EXECUTION matters. You apparently think if you have talent and execute then any offense can run up and down the field unfettered. Lets just line up in the Wing-T and with our talent if we execute then we should score on every play.

          Like

          • Biggus Rickus

            Yes, I do believe that any offense, more or less, can be successful if executed well. It’s not like Georgia’s lining up in the I and running Dooley’s old offense.

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            • Texas Dawg

              Then apparently your opinion is totally contrary to Saban. I suspect he knows a tiny little bit more about the game of football than you so I will come down on his side in that debate. Sure any offense well executed against inferior opponents will work. Against equal opponents, not so much.

              “It’s not like Georgia’s lining up in the I and running Dooley’s old offense.” No, we are about one or two generations removed from that while the rest of college football is 7-8 generations removed.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Uglydawg

              Isn’t everyone really all saying pretty much the same thing?
              “can be successful if executed well” is saying the same thing twice. If successful, it was executed well…if executed well it was successful. And the opposite. Not executed..not successful..gtp?
              “If”s are always big things.
              It’s installing an offense that practically can and will be executed well that’s the trick.
              I think what Saban is saying is that modern defenses are lagging offenses and there’s not a foreseeable way to change that. Until somebody comes up with that way, you adapt or lose.
              Joe Burrow is a one of a kind prophet sent to drive that point home in aces.
              However..LSU’s defense was a pretty good template for shutting down a similar talented offense in Clemson. And for the first half, Clemson’s defense showed us some answers. Crowd the LOS…crowd the receivers.
              Last night’s game was a picture of at least a little of the evolution of defensive answer to these high scoring offenses. Still lagging but showing some answers.
              Clemson’s defense got tired and lost it’s edge. (Probably LSU’s tough schedule compared to Clemson’s cupcake schedule was a factor. At least I enjoy thinking so).

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            • Tony Barnfart

              I’ll make a counter / additional point. It’s not even scheme, but philosophy. I believe Kirby when he says we have many of the same plays.

              The problem is that we didn’t have the quarterback who could buy time and create opportunities on “second chance routes” and improvised plays. So then our execution and timing have to be perfect. Also, from a “philosophy” standpoint we taught our players to be risk averse. We didn’t let the talent go eat, so to speak.

              It’s about (a) having a QB who can move and (b) taking the governor off the engine. I hate to say it, but a guy like Demtris Robertson would have had a field day in Joe Brady’s offense. On all those Burrow scrambles, he would have been uncovered 40 yards down the field. Because no matter how crappy he was at getting off an initial press, with the amount of time Burrow creates for his route runners, they eventually break free.

              Liked by 2 people

    • Yep we need a better coach we’ll never win anything.
      And Jake Fromm sucks .

      Like

    • Hunkering Hank

      LOL!

      Like

  2. Terry Crews

    Todd Monken comes in as OC or as a position coach?

    Like

    • MDDawg

      I have zero insider info, but after just googling his coaching history it’s hard to imagine he’d settle for anything less than Passing Game Coordinator & QB Coach (or WR coach). He’s been and OC at the college and NFL level plus he was head coach at Southern Miss for 3 seasons.

      Liked by 1 person

    • The other Doug

      Most likely position coach who is heavily involved in the offense. Like Brady at LSU.

      Like

  3. J-Dawg

    What I would rather see is Kirby “easing” Coley out the door and then buying out Bobo’s contract to bring him back while giving Boom a huge case of the red ass.

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    • Dante

      I would prefer that, too. But trying to put myself in Bobo’s shoes, he may not want to come back here as OC. He’s already done that. I would think it would feel like having to move back in with your parents. What he’s doing now is more akin to moving in with his weird uncle. That’s not great either but there’s more independence.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Macallanlover

        I agree with that, and doubt it does occur, but the trump card is: it’s Athens Jake. Sometimes when your travels and exploration/adventures have had their shot, the allure of “home” is very compelling. Being an OC in Athens, at UGA, will alwys have more appeal than where he has temporarily stopped. Might be less than 50/50 for reasons of timing, but down the road it is would be a better chance than you may think. If Smart hadn’t just put Coley in place in January, this might well have happened already.

        Like

  4. The other Doug

    “he will attack the entire field with the throwing game. His Oklahoma State offense attacked down the field quite a bit, but on every snap you had to be prepared to defend every zone, short to deep, inside and outside.”

    I’m gonna need a shower.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sanford222view

      There is one key miss in this analysis, though…will he bring the mullet to the Classic City? Surely his time in Stillwater allowed him to learn how to execute the fine hair stylings of Gundy.

      Like

      • The other Doug

        I hope there will be a mullet in Athens. Let’s be honest, Kirby has a dorky haircut that his mom gave him in 4th grade. We aren’t gonna win a Natty unless Kirby embraces change, and if he can’t even change his haircut….

        Like

  5. MGW

    Sounds sexy

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  6. Michael

    This would be great.

    Like

  7. Bright Idea

    LSU, Burrow and Brady has everyone begging for the magic bullet to catch that one magical season. Now it’s Bama and Clemson who. Lawrence gonna be questioned all off season now. Maybe an offensive associate and Newman will be ours. The new rule book is all in on winging it.

    Like

  8. DawgPhan

    Is Monken going to come in as assistant head coach? Doesnt seem like he would be taking an analyst job or QB coach, but maybe at UGA since maybe the Browns are still paying him?

    I always like adding guys like him to the program. Lots of experience in several different areas.

    Like

  9. No One Knows You're a Dawg

    Sooooo… he was the OC of the Browns this season and was the OC under Dirk Koetter at Tampa Bay for 3 seasons… :l

    Like

    • Will (the other one)

      Took over for Holgo at Okie St and improved on their numbers, and put up great numbers even without Weeden/Blackmon. Seems to run a very QB-friendly system while still putting up good rush numbers. I prefer him to the Zac Robinson rumors because he has coaching and playcalling experience (whereas with Robinson, the hope is he’d be able to Joe Brady the Rams offense even having never called plays.)

      Like

  10. Turd Ferguson

    Todd Monken is … underwhelming.

    Like

  11. ASEF

    So, Clemson just needs a better QB and some real receivers?

    Trevor was not accurate last night, and his receivers dropped a few, as well as negating a couple of big plays with some bad penalties.

    Playing an offense like LSU’s has players pressing coming out of the locker room. LSU’s defense is very good but Tua and Trevor have seen worse. And both of them made some bone-headed plays against LSU.

    Just amazing what they turned into this year.

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  12. duronimo

    Hire him. Let’s put the Monken on Coley’s back.

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  13. FlyingPeakDawg

    I’d prefer we just plug in a Heisman winning QB and our offense should work fine. Seems like a pretty straightforward formula.

    Like